Lisburn and the Great War Database

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IDSurnameForenameRank  NumberBattalionRegimentRegiment 2FormerlyBornEnlistedAddressNext of Kin AddressDied whereWhereDied howDate of DeathAgeBuried or CommemoratedBiographyLikenessPhoto Credit
1AbbottWilliam RobertPvt17676MGCSupport11 RIR 17114LisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0026Thiepval Memorial, FranceABBOTT, Private William Robert. Born in Lisburn, he lived at 15 McKeown Street in the town and was a member of the Heroes Temperance LOL 141. He enlisted in Lisburn and serving in A Company 11 RIR (17114) along with his two brothers Sergeant James (who belonged to the 1st. Lisburn Company of the UVF) and Rifleman Thomas. He embarked with them as a rifleman from Bordon Camp for France in October 1915 but subsequently transferred to 108 Company MGC 17676. Reported MIA and subsequently, in June 1917, confirmed as having been KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 26, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 5C or 12C. James and Thomas were both wounded in the same action. They were the sons of Maggie and Thomas Abbott of 15 McKeown Street, Lisburn where all three brothers lived. In June 1917 shortly after being notified that William was now officially considered to have been killed, his parents inserted the following poem in the Herald. “Had I but one last fond look into your loving face, Or had I only got the chance to kneel down in that place, To hold your head, my darling son, while your life blood ebbed away, My heart would not have felt so much the tears I shed to-day. In the bloom of his life death claimed him, In the pride of his manhood days; None knew him but to love him, None mention his name but with praise; But his unknown grave is the bitterest blow, Only an aching heart shall know”. Not long afterwards, on the 27 August 1917, Thomas Abbott senior died and was buried in Magheragall burial ground. James Abbott appears to have married Jane McGurk whose family also lived in McKeown Street - they lived at No. 12. She was the sister of John McGurk, who like William Abbott, was killed on the opening day of the Somme (see below).Abbott, WilliamILC&LM
2AdairGeorgeRm224311RIRIrishRandalstownRandalstownCrumlinCrumlinBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-16 00:00:0020Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumADAIR, Rifleman George. Born in Randalstown, he lived in Crumlin, and was a member of Ballynadrenta LOL 1059 in Glenavy and of the UVF. He enlisted at Randalstown and served in D Company 11 RIR (2243), embarking with them for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. He was KIA in Belgium on the 16.8.17 age 20 and, according to his Company Commander, "his loss is very deeply felt throughout the battalion ... he was greatly loved and respected both by the officers and men." His death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Zonnebeke, Belgium panels 138 to 140 and 162 to 162A and 163A. He was the son of late James Adair and Mary Adair of Seacash, Crumlin, Co. Antrim.
3AdamsRalphRm1712113RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0017Thiepval Memorial, FranceADAMS, Rifleman Ralph. Born in Lisburn, he lived in Hill Street, in the town where he enlisted in 13 RIR (17121). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 17, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15A/B. He was the son of Susan Adams of 31 Market Lane, Lisburn. His brother Edward, who served in India, lived at 3 Hill Street, Lisburn.
4AdamsRobertRm1937115RIRIrishCrumlinAntrimCrumlinLisburnBelgiumOtherKIA1918-10-20 00:00:0028Harlebeke New British Cemetery, BelgiumADAMS, Rifleman Robert. Born at Killcross, Crumlin, he lived in Crumlin, enlisted at Antrim and served in 15 RIR (19371). KIA in Belgium on the 20.10.18 age 28, he is buried in Harlebeke New British Cemetery, Harlebeke, Belgium, plot 10, row B, grave 4. He was the son of Mrs. Sarah Livingstone of 55 Antrim Street, Lisburn, Co. Antrim.
5AddisHenryRm1712611RIRIrishDerriaghyLisburnLisburn/BelfastLisburn (Castlerobin)FranceBelgian borderDOW1917-06-08 00:00:00Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceADDIS, Rifleman Henry. Born in Derriaghy, he lived in Lisburn and Belfast, and before the war was employed by John Herd at Seymour Hill Bleachworks, Dinmurry. Along with James Morrow (below) he was a member of Pond Park Red Cross Preceptory No. 13 and a member of the UVF. Enlisting in Lisburn, he served in 11 RIR (17126) with whom he embarked for France from Bordon in October 1915. He DoW in France on the 8.6.17, and is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, France, (close to the Franco-Belgium frontier) plot 3, row C, grave 177. There is no headstone inscription. His family lived at Castlerobin just north of Lisburn. On the 23 June 1917 they had the following poem inserted in the Herald. “He marched away so manly, His young head proudly held, His footsteps never faltered, His courage never failed. He sleeps in death, far, far from home, He owns a soldier’s grave, Proud Erin’s sons, o’er ocean foam, Have shown that he was brave. Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Uncles, Aunt and Cousins, and also his Grandfather”.
6AddisWilliam JohnPvt2362711RInFIrishBallinderryBelfastBelfast/BallinderryBallinderryHomeDied1918-11-09 00:00:00ADDIS, William John. Commemorated on Ballinderry Parish Church War Memorial. No positive trace so far.
7AgnewJamesRm50377RIRIrish2 RIR?BelfastLisburnDunmurry/BelfastBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-16 00:00:00Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumAGNEW, Rifleman James. Born in Belfast and living in Dunmurry (or Belfast), he enlisted at Lisburn, possibly in 2 RIR, and served in 7 RIR (5037). Wounded in August 1916 and KIA in Belgium on the 16.8.17, his death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Zonnebeke, Belgium, panels 138 to 140 and 162 to 162A and 163A.
8AlexanderJosephPvt228079RInFIrishBelfastBelfastH'boro B'murphy?FranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceALEXANDER, Private Joseph. Born in Belfast he lived in the Hillsborough area, enlisted at Belfast and served in the 9RInF (22807). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 4, face D or pier 5, face B.
9AlexanderRobert SRm1713413RIRIrishLisburnLisburnDunmurryDrumbegFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0019Thiepval Memorial, FranceALEXANDER, Rifleman Robert S. Born in Lisburn, he lived in Dunmurry, enlisted at Lisburn and served in 13 RIR (17134). Reported missing and subsequently, in May or June 1917, confirmed as having been KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 19, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, face A and B. He was the youngest son of the late Thomas and Mrs. Maria Alexander of Drumbeg, Dunmurry and brother of John Alexander above.
10AlexanderJohn2Lt8LstREnglishBelfastDrumbegFranceSommeKIA1916-07-15 00:00:0024Thiepval Memorial, FranceALEXANDER, 2nd Lieutenant John. Born in Belfast he was educated at Drumbeg National School from which he won a scholarship for Dundalk Educational Institute, "gaining first place in all Ireland." After completing his education he was employed in Harland and Wolff's and later at Belfast Ropeworks. He subsequently took first place (from 100 candidates) in a competitive exam for a position in the Belfast Co-operative Society. He received his commission through QUB OTC and served in the 8 LstR. KIA on the Somme on the 15.7.16 aged 24 only twelve days after going to the front, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France. He was the son of the late Thomas and Mrs. Maria Alexander of Drumbeg, Dunmurry, and brother of Robert Alexander below. Writing to his mother shortly after, Norman Reeves a fellow officer recorded that he had been killed, “while bombing a German trench”, and that, “one of their grenades fell near him. He did not suffer any pain. The Colonel was most shocked and went to his assistance, and unfortunately met his death”.Alexander, JohnNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
11AllenWilliam JohnRm302111RIRIrishLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceALLEN, Rifleman William John. Employed at the firm William Coulson and Son, he enlisted at Lisburn in A Company 11 RIR (3021) and embarked with them from Bordon Camp for France in October 1915. KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A and B. He was the husband of Mrs. Allen of 16 Church Street, Lisburn and father of five young children.
12AllenSamuelRm18.119912RIRIrish11RIRLisburnBelfastBelfast/LisburnBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1917-03-07 00:00:0034St. Quentin Cabaret Military Cemetery, Ploegsteert, BelgiumALLEN, Rifleman Samuel. Born in Lisburn, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast in 11 RIR and embarked with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. Wounded on the Somme on the 1.7.16 he was subsequently transferred to A Company 12 RIR (18/1199). KIA in Belgium on the 7.3.17 aged 34, he is buried in St. Quentin Cabaret Military Cemetery, Belgium, plot 2, row B, grave 7. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of Edward and Mary Allen of Lisburn and husband of Agnes Boyd, formerly Allen, of 39 Ardoyne Road, Belfast.
13AllenRobert HenryRmDM2/221143MTTDRASCSupportDunmurryBelfastBelfastBelfastHomeWoolwichDied1917-05-23 00:00:0026Dundonald Cemetery, BelfastALLEN, Private Robert Henry. Born in Dunmurry, he lived in and enlisted at Belfast serving in the RASC at the M[otor?]T[ransport?]. Training Depot (DM2/221143). He died in hospital at Woolwich on the 23.5.17 age 26 and is buried in Dundonald Cemetery, Belfast, plot E5, grave 844. He was the son of John T. and Sarah E. Allen of 47 Woodcot Avenue, Bloomfield, Belfast.
14AllenRobertPvtRIRIrishEdenderryALLEN, Rifleman Robert. Lived at Edenderry and served in the RIR. His death is commemorated on the memorial in Drumbo Presbyterian Church. No positive trace so far.
15AndersonWilliamPvt1753712HLIScottishDromara/DromoreDunoon, ArgyllshireLanarkFranceLensKIA1915-09-25 00:00:00Loos Memorial, FranceANDERSON, Private William. Born in Dromara, or Dromore, Co. Down, he lived in Lanark, enlisted at Dunoon, Argyllshire and served in 12 HLI (17537). KIA in France on the 25.9.15, his death is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, France panels 108-112.Anderson, WilliamPat Geary/De Ruvignys
16AndersonThomasPvt195541RSFScottishDrumboAyrshireCarryduffBelgiumYpresKIA1916-04-03 00:00:00Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumANDERSON, Private Thomas. Born in Drumbo, Co. Down, he lived in Carryduff, Co. Down, enlisted at Mauchline, Ayrshire and served in 1 RSF (19554). KIA in Belgium on the 3.4.16, his death is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium, Panels 19 and 33.
17AndrewsRobertRm56942RIRIrishCulcaveyBelfastBelfastBelgiumYpresKIA1915-04-20 00:00:0017Elzenwalle Brasserie Cemetery, Voormezelle, BelgiumANDREWS, Rifleman Robert. Born in Culcavey, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 2 RIR (5694). KIA in Belgium on the 20.4.15 aged 17, he is buried in Elzenwalle Brasserie Cemetery, Voormezelle, Belgium, plot 1, row D, grave 4. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of Mrs. Alice J Andrews of 62 Mountjoy Street, Belfast.Andrews, RobertNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
18AndrewsJamesRm1616613RIRIrishH'boroBelfastCulcaveyFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Connaught Cemetery, Thiepval, FranceANDREWS, Rifleman James. Born in Hillsborough, Co. Down, he lived in Culcavey, enlisted at Belfast and served in 13 RIR (16166). Reported wounded and subsequently KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, he is buried in Connaught Cemetery, Thiepval, France, plot 3, row J, grave 10. There is no headstone inscription.Andrews, JamesPat Geary/Lisburn.com As It Was
19AndrewsJamesRm1710511RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceANDREWS, Rifleman James. Born in Lisburn, he lived in 72 Hillhall Road, in the town, before the war he, "worked for Mr. Tollerton" and was a member of the UVF. He enlisted at Lisburn and served in C Company 11 RIR (17105) embarking with them from Bordon Camp for France in October 1915. He acted as orderly for Captain Cecil Ewart (below) and was KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16. His death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A/B. He was the husband of Jane Andrews of 72 Hillhall Road, Lisburn and brother of David and brother-in-law of Sarah Andrews of Christ Church, Lisburn.
20AndrewsMatthewRm91622RIRIrishLisburnBelfastBelgiumMessinesKIA1918-09-06 00:00:00Wulverghem-Lindenhoek Road Military Cemetery, BelgiumANDREWS, Rifleman Matthew. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 2 RIR (9162). KIA in Belgium on the 6.9.18, he is buried in Wulverghem-Lindenhoek Road, Military Cemetery, Belgium, plot 4, row D, grave 16. There is no headstone inscription.
21AndrewsWilliamRm5.5035RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLisburnLisburnHomeLisburnDied1918-12-04 00:00:00Lisburn CemeteryANDREWS, Rifleman William. Served in 5 RIR and may have been a reservist. His death is commemorated on Lisburn and Christ Church War Memorials. No positive trace so far.
22ArmstrongJohnPvt106652RInFIrishLisburnDublinCo. MeathCo. MeathFranceLensKIA1915-05-16 00:00:0017Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg-l'Avoue, FranceARMSTRONG, Private John. Born in Lisburn, Co. Antrim, he lived at Oldcastle, Co. Meath, enlisted at Dublin and served in 2 RInF (10665). KIA in France on the 16.5.15 aged 17, his death is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, France, panels 16 and 17. He was the son of William and Kate Armstrong of Lower-Finor, Oldcastle.
23ArmstrongJamesPvt101281RInFIrishLisburnBelfastBelfastTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-05-22 00:00:0029Helles Memorial, GallipoliARMSTRONG, Private James. Born in Lisburn, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RInF (10128). KIA in Gallipoli on the 22.5.15 aged 29, his death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panels 97-101. He was the son of Walter and Sarah Jane Armstrong of 88 Broomfield Street, Crumlin Road, Belfast.
24ArmstrongWilliamPvt123111RIrFIrishDunmurryBelfastMonaghanFranceCambraiKIA1917-11-23 00:00:00Cambrai Memorial, Louverval Military Cemetery, FranceARMSTRONG, Private William. Born in Dunmurry, Co. Antrim, he lived in Monaghan, enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RIrF (12311). KIA in France on the 23.11.17, his death is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, Nord, France, panel 10.
25AshmoreRichard HowellPvt5250782FACEF CAMCImperial18FACo. LeitrimCanada, VictoriaCanada, McKay, BCCanada/Co. LeitrimFranceArrasDOW1917-05-06 00:00:0045Aubigny Comunal cemetery Extension, FranceASHMORE, Private Richard Howell. CoI. Born in Creevelea, Co. Leitrim on the 22.2.1872, he was educated at RBAI and QUB, before becoming the principal of the Intermediate School in Lisburn and later the College, Clonmel. However, chronic laryngitis forced him to give up teaching for a number of years and for a time he studied in Germany. He subsequently emigrated to British Columbia where he lived in McKay, returned to the teaching profession, and became principal of Cranbrook High School. Enlisting at Victoria, B.C. on the 11.11.16 aged 44 having been in the 18 FA in Vancouver for one month, he was 5’ 10½” tall, had a 41” chest (fully expanded) with a 5” range of expansion. Of a ruddy complexion, he had blue-grey eyes and grey hair. He served in the 2 FA Canadian Army Medical Corps (525078), DoW on the 6.5.17 aged 45 and is buried in Aubigny Communal Cemetery Extension, Pas de Calais, France, plot 2, row F, grave 84. The cemetery is just south of the village of Aubigny-en-Artois which is approximately 15 kilometres north-west of Arras. It was used by the 1st Canadian CCS in 1917 during the capture of Vimy Ridge by the Canadian Corps. He was the son of the Rev. John and Mrs. Ashmore of Drumkeerin, Co. Leitrim and husband of Mary Ashmore of McKay and subsequently Mission City, British Columbia.
26AtkinsonWilliamPvt34401.8ASHScottishLisburnDunoonGlasgowFranceArrasKIA1916-07-02 00:00:0038Maroeuil Cemetery, FranceATKINSON, Private William. Born in Lisburn, Co. Antrim, he lived in Glasgow, enlisted at Dunoon and served in 1/8 ASH (3440). KIA in France on the 2.7.16 aged 38, he is buried in Maroeuil Cemetery, France, plot 2, row J, grave 11.
27AtkinsonWilliamSgt91832SeHScottishLisburnDublinFranceOtherKIA1918-04-24 00:00:00St. Venant-Robecq Rd., British Cemetery, FranceATKINSON, Sergeant William, MM. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Dublin and served in 2 SeH (9183). KIA in France on the 24.4.18, he is buried in St. Venant-Robecq Road British Cemetery, France, plot 3, row D, grave 2.
28AtkinsonWilliam GeorgePvt249793116CEFImperial5RIR and 208Co. DownTorontoH'boroH'boroFranceAmiensKIA1918-08-08 00:00:0030Hourges Orchard Cemetery, Dormat-sur-la Luce, FranceATKINSON, Private William George. Born in Co. Down on 29.10.1887, his address was "The Lodge", Hillsborough Castle, Hillsborough. A plasterer by trade, he enlisted at Toronto on the 27.6.1916 aged 28 years and 8 months. His physical development on enlistment was described as good, he had no smallpox marks and 2 vaccination marks on his left arm. 5'9 1/2" in height, his chest measured 37" (minimum) and 40" (maximum). Weighing 152 1/2 lbs (10 stone 14 ounces) he had a fresh complexion, dark grey eyes and brown hair. He had a scar on his right ankle and a scar on both knees. On enlistment he had 3 years military experience as a private with 5 RIR, a reserve battalion. He was posted to the 208th. battalion and subsequently to the 116th. battalion Canadian Infantry (249793). KIA in France on the 8.8.18 aged 35, he is buried in Hourges Orchard Cemetery, Domart-sur-La-Luce, France, row A grave 40. He was the husband of Mrs. Dorcas Atkinson of "The Lodge", Hillsborough Castle, Hillsborough, Co. Down.Atkinson, WilliamGeorgeNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
29AyreSamuelRm128111RIRIrishKirkinola, Co. AntrimLisburnCrumlin/GlenavyGlenavy/CrumlinBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-16 00:00:0028Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumAYRE, Rifleman Samuel. Born in Kirkinnola, Co. Antrim, he lievd in Glenavy or Crumlin, Co. Antrim. A member of the Orange Order in Glenavy, he enlisted at Lisburn, Co. Antrim and served in D Company 11 RIR (1281). Embarking for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915, he was wounded on the Somme on the 1.7.16. Reported wounded and subsequently KIA in Belgium on the 16.8.17 age 28, his death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Zonnebeke, Belgium, panels 138 to 140, 162 to 162A and 163A. He was the son of James Ayre of Glenavy and husband of Rachel Ayre of Hill Street, Crumlin.
30BailyW M INurse38 SHVADSupportDunmurryDunmurry, Seymour HillItalyGenoaDied1918-09-23 00:00:00Staglieno Cemetery, GenoaBAILEY Nurse Wilhelmina M. I. CoI. The youngest daughter of the late William Charley D.L. and sister of Mr. E.J. Charley both of Seymour Hill, Dunmurry, she was married in Los Angeles to Mr. S. Baily, “an English Gentleman”. During the war she joined the Dunmurry VAD, serving in the UVF hospital in Belfast in 1915 and in York Military Hospital in 1916. She volunteered for foreign service in 1917 and was posted to Salonica and later Italy, serving at 38th Stationary Hospital, Voluntary Aid Detachment, Genoa. She died in Italy on the 23 September 1918 and is buried in Staglieno Cemetery, Genoa, Italy, plot 1, row B, grave 36. The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915 and Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918. Rest camps and medical units were established at various locations in northern Italy behind the front, some of them remaining until 1919. From November 1917 to the end of the war, Genoa was a base for Commonwealth forces and the 11th General, and 38th and 51st Stationary Hospitals, were posted in the city.
31BakerDawsonPvt43041.5SeHScottishBelfastBelfastBelfastLisburnFranceAmiensDied/illness1915-12-24 00:00:0040Villers-Bocage Military Cemetery, FranceBAKER, Private Dawson. Living at 83 Montrose Street, Belfast, he was employed at Queensisland before the war. Having enlisted at Belfast in June 1915 he served in 1/5 SeH (4304) and died in a Highland casualty clearing station in France on the 24.12.15 aged 40, from an illness contracted while on active service. Buried in Villers-Bocage Communal Cemetery Extension, France, row B, grave 7, he had lived with his sister in Montrose Street, and was the youngest son of John and Isabella Baker of 10 Seymour Street, Lisburn, Co. Antrim. They had another son and 4 grandsons in the army. One of them, Dawson’s nephew Walter Baker, was KIA in Belgium a year and a half later (see below). Two years after that, on the 16 August 1919, a series of In Memoriam notices from Walter Dawson’s aunts and uncles – J and C. Howe of 39 Milbrook Road, Lisburn and M.D. Armstrong and A.R. Ritchie, as well as his mother (probably Dawson’s sister-in-law) and stepfather, grandfather, John Baker (presumably Dawson’s father) and aunt, E. Baker, all of 10 Seymour Street, Lisburn appeared in the Herald remembering both Dawson and Walter. From M.D. Armstrong and A.R. Ritchie, “Though sad we mark their closing eyes Of those we loved in days gone by, Yet sweet in death, our latest song. We’ll meet again, ‘twill not be long”. From the Howes, “Its hard to part from those we love, Though parting days will come; Yet let us hope to meet above, For this is not our home”. From Walter’s mother and stepfather, “I shall meet them some bright morning, Resting by the waters fair; They are waiting for my coming, In the upper garden there”. From Walter’s grandfather (Dawson’s father) and aunt, “Now the great peace day is coming, But their great peace day is won”.
32BakerWalterRm691614RIRIrishLisburnBelfastLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-16 00:00:00Bridgehouse Cemetery, Langemark, BelgiumBAKER, Rifleman Walter. Born in Lisburn, he lived in 10 Seymour Street in the town and was employed by Mr. Connor a cabinet maker. A member of the Church Lads’ Brigade and the Temperance Silver Band, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 14 RIR (6916). He embarked for France in October 1915 and was home on his first leave in July 1917 five weeks before his death. KIA in Belgium on the 16 August 1917 he is buried in Bridgehouse Cemetery, Langemarck, Belgium, row C, grave 1. There is no headstone inscription. An only son, his mother and stepfather lived at 10 Seymour Street, Lisburn. He was a nephew of Dawson Baker, above, and had another uncle and four cousins on active service. On the 16 August 1919 a series of In Memoriam notices from his aunts and uncles – J and C. Howe of 39 Milbrook Road, Lisburn and M.D. Armstrong and A.R. Ritchie, as well as one from his mother and stepfather, and one from his grandfather, John Baker and aunt, E. Baker, all of 10 Seymour Street, Lisburn appeared in the Herald remembering both Dawson and Walter. From M.D. Armstrong and A.R. Ritchie, “Though sad we mark their closing eyes Of those we loved in days gone by, Yet sweet in death, our latest song. We’ll meet again, ‘twill not be long”. From the Howes, “Its hard to part from those we love, Though parting days will come; Yet let us hope to meet above, For this is not our home”. From his mother and stepfather, “I shall meet them some bright morning, Resting by the waters fair; They are waiting for my coming, In the upper garden there”. From his grandfather and aunt, “Now the great peace day is coming, But their great peace day is won”.
33BallDavid HarrisPvt725628AEFImperialDromaraWestern AustraliaW Australia/DromaraFranceSommeKIA1918-09-02 00:00:0038Peronne Communal Cemetery, FranceBALL, Private David Harris. Born at Dromara, Co. Down in about 1880, he was educated at the Belfast Model School and Dublin Training College, and was a teacher by profession. He emigrated to Australia in about 1902 at the age of 22 and lived with his wife Eva Ella and son Hector at Greenbushes, Western Australia where he taught in the local school. Enlisting at Bunbury, W.A. between the 2 and 21.3.17 aged 36 years and 7 months, he was 5’ 11” tall, weighed 144 lbs. and had a 32-35” chest. With a fair complexion, blue eyes and brown hair, his sight was 6/6 in both eyes. He entered Blackboy Hill camp for training on the 16.5.17 at which time his records show that he required extensive dental treatment. Completed by the 21.8.17 he had in the meantime gone to the NCO school at Clarefront? in June where he spent 6? weeks training before returning to Blackboy as a Corporal having been promoted on the 1.8.17. Subsequently he went through a _ _ _ and bombing school there. Posted to 28 Australian Infantry A.I.F. (7256) on the 9.1.18, he took his final leave between the 28 and 30.1.18. Sailing from Freemantle on the R.M.S. “Ormond” on 13 March 1918 he reached Suez on the 4.4.18. After spending nearly 4 weeks at the Australian camp there, he embarked for England from Port Tewfik on the “Ellenga” on the 30.4.18. Arriving at Southampton on the 15.5.18, he transferred to the 5th. T[raining] Battalion at Favant and reverted to his original rank of Private. Promoted to Acting Lance Corporal five days later on the 20.5.18, he reverted again to Private on the 7.8.18, the day before he was posted overseas to France. Leaving England from Folkestone on the 8.8.18, he landed at Le Havre on the 10.8.18 leaving there for the front two days later on the 12.8.18. Arriving with his unit on the 15.8.18, he went into action on the 29th and was killed in action at Mont St. Quentin on 2.9.18 age 38. Where David Ball was originally buried is unknown but on the 19.12.19 the Military authorities in Melbourne wrote to his wife informing her that he had been re-buried in Peronne Communal Cemetery Extension, France, plot 3, row E, grave 20, although the CWGC records give grave 21. His headstone inscription reads, “Beloved husband of Eva and father of Hector Ball. Love ever gives”. The AWM records that, “he leaves a wife and one surviving son to mourn their loss residing in Western Australia”.
In his will dated the 8.5.17 which he had deposited with the West Australian Bank in Greenbushes, David Ball left “all belongings, property etc. and moneys” to his wife. On the 30.9.18 the AIF Kit Store at 110 Greyhound Road, Fulham, London had received “from the field” a sealed parcel containing his effects. These were a letter case, photos and a diary. The Base Records Dept. at Victoria Barracks, Melbourne forwarded a package to Eva Bell on the 4.6.19 which she acknowledged receipt of on the 17.6.19. However, on the 8.1.1920 she wrote to the Officer in Charge at the Base Records Dept., “Could you tell me if there is any possibility of ever getting my husband’s wristlet watch and the ring he was wearing at the time he fell? The watch was a presentation to him from the children of the Greenbushes School and is inscribed. I would be very grateful if you could make inquiries that might lead to the recovery of these for me”. The reply which was sent less than two weeks later was that, “no personal effects of your husband … have been received at this Office other than the package forwarded to you on the 6.6.19. If you husband’s watch and ring were recovered at the time of his death they would be forwarded to this Office for disposal. Advice has been received from A.I.F. Headquarters, London, that all effects of members of the A.I.F. recovered by that administration have been correctly dealt with, but recent enquiries have proved fruitless owing to the inaccessibility of records during this period of demobilisation and repatriation. However, in the event of the articles … being included in consignments of effects now on the water, they will be promptly forwarded to you on arrival”. There is no evidence that Eva Ball ever received her husband’s watch and ring. However, between July 1921 and June 1923 she was sent a Memorial Scroll and Plaque, photographs of her husband’s grave and his Victory Medal.

The son of John and Martha Ball and husband of Eva Ella Ball of Broomehill, Western Australia, she gave the AWM the details of James Ball of Mullaughdrin, Dromara, Co. Down as a contact for further information. Towards the end of the War she moved from Greenbushes to live at 1138 Hay Street, West Perth and then “Lynton” 47 Collin Street, West Perth. In January 1920 she moved again, this time to Broomehill, c/o a Mr. L. (or H.) McDonald. This may have been her own family, for David Ball was the brother in law of Gunner John Alexander McDonald 15 FA Bde. AFA 31712. He had sailed from Melbourne on the 13.12.16, landing at Plymouth on the 17.2.17. He was admitted to the Military Hospital Fargo on the 24.7.17 and transferred to Tidworth Military Hospital where he died of Cerebro Spinal Meningitis at 8.15 a.m. on 30.7.17. He is buried in Tidworth Military cemetery, Wiltshire, row C, grave 325. His wife Ethel May, daughters, Margaret Edna and Dorothy Jane and son Gordon Stanley John, all lived at Tambellup, W.A. David Ball was also the brother in law of Sgt. John Richard Norrish (7790), a stretcher bearer with 16 AI. He won the MM at Hamel Wood on the 4.7.18. Having survived the war, he returned to Australia in July 1919. Eva Ball’s address on the AWM is given as c/o Mrs. J.R. Norrish, Broomehill.
34BankheadSamuelPvtS/401531CHScottishMonkstownBelfastBelfastFranceBelgian borderKIA1917-07-12 00:00:00Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceBANKHEAD, Private Samuel. Born in Monkstown, Co. Antrim, he lived in and enlisted at Belfast serving in 1 CH (S/40153). KIA in France on the 12.7.17, he is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, Nord, France, (close to the Franco-Belgium frontier), plot 3, row D, grave 274.
35BarrThomas JohnSgtA/223688CEF MtbaRImperialMaze, Lisburncanada, WinnipegWinnipeg, CanadaMaze, Lisburn/WinnipegBelgiumPoperingheDOW1916-07-09 00:00:0033Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, BelgiumBARR, Sergeant Thomas John. Born at the Maze on the 22.8.1882, he joined the North of Ireland Imperial Yeomanry (later to become the NIH) when he was 18 and served in the Boer War, receiving the King's medal. He was then in the South African constabulary for 3 years during which time he "served against" the Zulus in 1906. He later left South Africa for Canada, living at 12 1/2 Vinbourg Apartments, Agnes Street, Winnipeg and joining the 34th Fort Garry Horse. A motorman by profession, he enlisted at Winnipeg on the 18.3.15 aged 32 years and 7 months, he was 5'9 1/2" tall, had a 36" chest with 2 1/2" expansion, fresh complexion, blue eyes and dark brown hair. Having been posted to 8 CI MtbaR (A/22368 or 422368), he returned to Belfast on leave in April 1916. Wounded by shrapnel on the 5 July he subsequently DoW in a casualty clearing station in Belgium on the 9.7.16 age 33. Buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinge, Belgium, plot 8, row C, grave 8, he was the second son of John and Hannah Jane Carlisle Barr of The Maze, Lisburn, Co. Down, and husband of Mrs. T.J. Barr of 12 1/2 Vinbourg Apartments, Agnes Street Winnipeg.
36BartonPatrickPvt117012RInFIrishBroxburn, LinlithgowCoatbridgeLisburnFranceOther/St. QuentinKIA1918-03-21 00:00:00Essigny-le-Grand German Cemetery Memorial 10, Grand-Seracourt British Cemetery, FranceBARTON, Private Patrick. Born in Broxburn, Linlithgo, he lived in Lisburn, enlisted at Coatbridge and served in 2 RInF (11701). KIA in France on the 21.3.18, his death is commemorated on the Essigny-le-Grand German Cemetery Memorial 10 in Grand-Seracourt British Cemetery, Aisne, France. This is a concentration cemetery made between 1920 and 1926. It contains burials and memorials to those "buried near this spot" or who were buried by the Germans and whose graves could not be found. The remains of 99 British soldiers (largely Ulster Division) killed in March and April 1918 were brought here from Essigny-le-Grand German Cemetery.
37BaxterEdward JamesPvt135969RInFIrishBeragh, Co. TyroneCo. Donegal, Finner CampLegacurry/BeraghFranceRearDOW1916-05-22 00:00:00Etaples Military Cemetery, FranceBAXTER, Private Edward. Born in Beragh, Co. Tyrone, he enlisted at Finner Camp, Co. Donegal and served in 9 RInF (13596). Reported in the Standard as a “Lisburn Casualty” he DoW in France on the 22.5.16. He was the son of Sarah Maxwell of Legacurry and Beragh, Co. Tyrone. He is buried in Etaples Military Cemetery, France, plot 5, row D, grave 4A.
38BeastonJamesCSM146913RIRIrishH'boroBelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-06-28 00:00:00Martinsart British Cemetery, FranceBEASTON, CSM James. Born in Hillsborough, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast, served in 13 RIR (1469) and was KIA on the Somme on the 28.6.16. He and 13 colleagues in his company were killed (10 immediately and 4 later of wounds) by a German shell which landed amongst them as they paraded in Martinsart village square to go on duty. They were all buried in Martinsart British Cemetery plot 1, row A. All Commonwealth War Graves Commission entries for these men give grave 1, presumably therefore it is a communal grave. Of the 14, 7 are on this list, CSM Beaston and Riflemen A.V. Crangle, R. Crawley, S. Hamilton, G. Heenan, T. Mercer and J.G. Thompson. There is no headstone inscription.
39BeattieJohn JamesSgt1831911RInFIrishH'boroBelfastH'boroH'boroBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-16 00:00:0032Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumBEATTIE, Sergeant John James. Born in and address Hillsborough, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 11 RInF (18319). KIA in Belgium on the 16.8.17 aged 32, his death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium, panels 70-2. He was the husband of Sarah Beattie of Ballynahinch Street, Hillsborough and son of James and Elizabeth Beattie of Lisburn Street, Hillsborough, Co. Down.
40BeattieWilliam JohnSgt76912RIRIrishA Co 11RIR?GilfordLisburnLisburnFranceCambraiKIA1917-11-22 00:00:0024Cambrai Memorial, Louverval Military Cemetery, FranceBEATTIE, Sergeant William John. Born in Guilford, Co. Down, he enlisted at Lisburn possibly in A Company 11 RIR with whom he may have embarked from Bordon Camp for France as a Rifleman in October 1915. KIA at Cambrai in France while serving with C Company 12 RIR (769), on the 22.11.17 aged 24, his death is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval Military Cemetery, France, panel 10. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Beattie of 14 Linenhall Street, Lisburn.Beattie, WilliamJohnNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
41BeckJamesRm1724411RIRIrishH'boroLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-08 00:00:0019Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumBECK, Rifleman James. Born in Hillsborough, he lived in Longstone Street, Lisburn and served his time in Messrs. Millar and Stevensons’ Bakery. A member of the Christ Church Company Church Lads’ Brigade and of the UVF, he enlisted at Lisburn, served in A Company 11 RIR (17244) and embarked with them for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Wounded on the Somme on the 1.7.16, he was KIA at Ypres on the 8.8.17 aged 19. His death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate, Memorial, Belgium. He was the son of the late John Beck and Annie Rogan, formerly Beck, and step-son of Moses Rogan of Lisburn Street Hillsborough and formerly 46 Sloan Street, Lisburn, Co. Antrim. His sister was Leta Beck. The news of James Beck’s death was received by his mother in a letter from her other son Rifleman Hugh H. (Harry) Beck who was also on active service. He and his wife Lizzie lived at 80 Longstone Street, Lisburn while a sister Mary Craig and her husband John lived at number 19. All the family inserted death notices in the Herald on the 1 September 1917. From his parents, “Greater love hath no man than this”. From the Craigs, “Fleeting time will re-unite us, Thou art only gone before” and from Harry and Lizzie Beck, “In a far distant land though his body may rest, Far from his home and the ones he loved best, Still deep in our hearts his memory we keep, Sweet is the place where he now lies asleep”. A fourth was included by “his loving friend, Jeannie Ferguson” of Plantation, Lisburn. “At the rivers crystal brink, Christ shall join each broken link”. Was she James beck’s girlfriend? On the 9 August 1919 his family once again inserted In memoriam notices in the Herald. From Annie and Moses Rogan and Leta and Robert Beck at Lisburn Street, Hillsborough, “Not gone from memory, nor from love, But to his Father’s home above”. From Hugh H. and Lizzie Beck, still at 80 Longstone Street, “Deeply regretted” and from Mary and John Craig now living at 46 Sloan Street, “His fair young life laid down before his prime, His sweet spring-tide had but begun: Alas! For harvest-time”. In addition there was a notice from “his chum” A. Kerr of 37 Church Street, Lisburn, “In loving memory”. Beck, JamesNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
42BeersSamuelRm112506RIRIrishDrumboBelfastLisburnBelfast/StoneyfordTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-08-14 00:00:0020Helles Memorial, GallipoliBEERS, Rifleman Samuel. Born in Drumbo, Co. Down, he lived in Lisburn, enlisted at Belfast, and served in 6 RIR (11250). KIA at Gallipoli on the 14.8.15 aged 20, his death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, part 2. He was the son of Isabella Beers, Ballylesson, Belfast and the late William Beers and husband of Martha Beers of Rushey Hill, Stoneyford, Lisburn, Co. Antrim. Their son (also Samuel) was born while his father was serving overseas and Samuel snr. never saw him before his death.
43BeggsHenry ParkerLt8RIRIrishDunmurryFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceBEGGS, Captain Henry Parker. Before the war he was employed by Messrs. Richardson, Sons and Owden at their Glenmore works. A member of Lisburn and Cliftonville Cricket Clubs and Cliftonville Hockey Club he also belonged to the UVF. Commissioned into B Company 8 RIR in 1914, and promoted to Captain in early 1916, he was reported MIA and subsequently KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16. His death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France and on a separate memorial in St. Colman’s Parish Church, Dunmurry erected, “To the Beloved Memory of Captain Henry Parker Beggs 8 RIR missing, believed killed at Thiepval, France”. It was unveiled at a memorial service held on the 28 June 1919. In a report in the Standard for the 18.10.18 regarding his brother’s decoration, he was still listed as missing. According to the Standard he was, “one of the most unassuming young men and never wished to appear in the limelight. So sensitive indeed was he in this respect that he expressed the wish should anything happen that his photograph should not appear in the newspapers”. The youngest son of Samuel and Minnie Beggs, Chestnut Villa, Dunmurry, and grandson of the late Mr. W.J.M. Parker of Carelton House, Blaris, his father was “associated with” the firm of Richardson and Owden. He was a brother of Mrs. W.S. Ritchie and of Lt. S. Parker Beggs. He was a graduate of QUB and had served his apprenticeship with Mr. L.L. Macassey. Before joining the army he had been a civil engineer with the Congested Districts Board. Serving with the RE during the war, he was awarded the MC in October 1918. He survived and along with the other members of his family attended the memorial service to his brother in Dunmurry in June 1919. Beggs, HenryParkerNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
44BellWilliamRm88551RIRIrishBlarisLisburnBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1915-05-09 00:00:0032Ploegsteert Memorial, BelgiumBELL, Rifleman William. Born in Blaris, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 1 RIR (8855). KIA in Belgium on the 9.5.15 aged 32. His death is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium. He was the son of Mrs. William Gray.
45BellRobertLcpl94231RInFIrishCrumlinBallykinlarLisburnEgyptGallipoliDOW1915-06-01 00:00:00Chatby Military War and Memorial Cemetery, Alexandria, EgyptBELL, Lance corporal Robert. Born in Crumlin, Co. Antrim, he lived in Lisburn, enlisted at Ballykinlar, Co. Down and served in 1 RInF (9423). He DoW in Egypt, probably from wounds received at Gallipoli, on the 1.6.15, and is buried in Alexandria (Chatby) Military and War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt, row M, grave 103.
46BellArthurRm203949RIRIrishKilleadClandeboyeCrumlinCrumlinFranceSommeDOW1916-06-04 00:00:0018Forceville Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceBELL, Rifleman Arthur. Born in Killead (beside Aldergrove airport), he lived in Crumlin, Co. Antrim. A member of the Orange Order in Glenavy, he enlisted at Clandeboye, Co. Down and served in A Company 9 RIR (11/6455). He DoW on the Somme on the 4.6.16 aged 18, and is buried in Forceville Communal Cemetery and Extension, France, plot 1, row D, grave 2. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of Daniel and Mary Jane Bell of the Diamond, Crumlin, Co. Antrim.
47BellJames AlexanderPvt140279RIrFIrishShankillBelfastAghaleeAghaleeFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0019Thiepval Memorial, FranceBELL, Private James Alexander. Born in Shankill, Belfast, he lived in Aghalee, Co. Antrim. He enlisted at Belfast and served in 9 RIrF (14027). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 age 19, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15A. He was the son of John, (who died on the 7.2.21), and Martha Bell of Derryash, Aghalee. His death is also commemorated on the family headstone in Lower Ballinderry Maravian churchyard.
48BellJohn (Jack)Rm1938314RIRIrishWorkingtonLisburn/Belfast?LisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0023Thiepval Memorial, FranceBELL, Rifleman John (Jack). Born in Workington, Cumberland, he lived at 2 Hillhall Road in Lisburn where he and his two brothers Andrew and Harry, were members of the South Antrim Volunteers, the local battalion of the UVF. He enlisted either in Lisburn or Belfast and served in 14 RIR, the Young Citizens Volunteers, (19383). Initially reported missing, he had been KIA on the Somme on the 1 July 1916 age 23. He was the husband of Maria and father of Jennie Bell of 71 Mercer Street and 2 Hillhall Road, Lisburn. Maria had the following poem included with an In Memoriam notice published in the Herald on the 30 June 1917. ”Gone from this earth so swiftly, Plucked like a flower in bloom; He was so good and thoughtful, Yet called away so soon”. Another notice in the Herald on the 5 July 1919 read, “God knows how much we miss him. Ever remembered by his sorrowing Wife and little Daughter.” He was the son of Mrs. Bell of Mercer Street, Lisburn and of John Bell of Riverside Terrace, Old Hillsbotough Road, in the town. Why his parents had different addresses is not clear. One possibility is that his mother had gone to live with her daughter-in-law while her sons and husband were away, for John Bell senior, Harry and Andrew Bell also served in the army. Although all appear to have survived, they did not do so unscathed. John senior had been invalided home “some months” prior to August 1916. Harry and Andrew for their part were both involved in the fighting on the 1st July. Andrew was seriously wounded while Harry, who lived on the Old Hillsborough Road in Lisburn, was mistakenly listed as KIA. Shortly after though, he wrote to his mother “mentioning that he was alright”. He also tried to reassure her about Jack who was missing, pleading with her, “not to worry, as there are some of the boys who have been reported missing coming in yet”. Jack Bell was not one of them. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, face A/B. His sister and brother-in-law, Maggie and William Irwin, lived at 76 Bachelors’ Walk, Lisburn.
49BellRobertPvt140359RIrFIrishCrilly, Co. TyroneBelfastDunmurryFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceBELL, Private Robert. Born in Crilly, Co. Tyrone, he lived in Dunmurry, enlisted at Belfast and served in 9 RIrF (14035). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France pier and face 15A.
50BellRobert JosephSgt2258611RIRIrishGlenavyFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0021Thiepval Memorial, France Addenda PanelBELL, Sergeant Robert Joseph. A member of the Orange Order in Glenavy, he served in 11 RIR (11/61) with whom he may have embarked from Bordon Camp for France in October 1915. KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 age 21, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, Addenda Panel. He was the son of Robert and Rose Ann Bell of Ballyvorally, Glenavy, Co. Antrim. His death is also commemorated on the family headstone in Glenavy Parish church graveyard which was erected by his mother. She died on the 7.12.31 aged 69, twenty years to the day after her husband Robert, RJ's father, who died on the 7.12.11 aged 80.
51BellJohnGnr32885119 bty 27 BdeRFASupportDromaraBelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-07-24 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceBELL, Gunner John. Born in Dromara, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 119 Battery 27 Bde. RFA (32885). KIA on the Somme on the 24.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 1 A and 8 A.
52BellGeorge ReillyGds62702IGIrishC'dwson/M'flt?DublinCastledawsonFranceArrasKIA1918-01-21 00:00:0027Brown's Copse Cemetery, Roeux, FranceBELL, Guardsman George Reilly. Born at Castledawson or Magherafelt, he had an address in Castledawson but worked as a police constable in the RIC in Lisburn. He and four other constables (Christopher Coldwell, William Cunningham, P. Shields and William Stewart) had left Lisburn on the 29 December 1914 to enlist in the Irish Guards. “Large crowds” had assembled to see them off, and each was presented with a box of cigarettes before they left. Marching from Smithfield barracks, they were escorted by a guard of honour made up of men in 11 RIR. According to the Standard, “the constables went direct to London” although the WOCL records that Bell enlisted in Dublin. He served in 2 IG (6270), although it is possible that he was originally in 1 IG, the same battalion as his comrades. KIA in France on the 21.1.18 aged 27, he is buried in Brown's Copse Cemetery, Roeux, France, plot 4, row C, grave 36. He was the son of Joseph and Elizabeth Bell. Of the five constables who left Lisburn that afternoon late in December 1914, at least three, Bell, Coldwell (below) and Cunningham (below), were to die before the war was over. Shields appears to have survived and Stewart may have done so as well, although his fate is less certain. A Guardsman William Stewart who was born in Hamilton Lanark, enlisted in West Calder, Midlothian and served in 2 IG (7365), DoW in France on the 15.11.15 aged 27. Buried in Longuenesse (St. Omer) Souvenir Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France, plot, 3, row A, grave 12, he was the husband of Janet Stewart of 22 Blantyre Terrace, Edinburgh.
53BellEdwardGnr68653130RGASupportMoiraHammersmithHammersmithFranceSomme/RearDOW1918-04-14 00:00:00Namps-au-Val British Cemetery, FranceBELL, Gunner Edward. Born in Moira, Co. Down, he enlisted at Hammersmith, Middlesex and served in 130 Heavy Battery RGA (68653). He DoW in France on the 14.4.18, and is buried in Namps-Au-Val British Cemetery, Somme, France plot 2, row C, grave 30. He was the husband of Mrs. E. Bell of 54 Cambridge Row, Hammersmith, London.
54BellWilliamRm2RIRIrishBELL, Rifleman William. A member of the Orange Order in Glenavy, he served in 2 RIR. His death is commemorated on the memorials in Glenavy Parish Church and Glenavy Orange Hall. No positive trace so far.
55BensonJohnSgt1717811RIRIrishLisburnLisburnDunmurryBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-16 00:00:00Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumBENSON, Sergeant John. Born at Lisburn, and living in Dunmurry, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 11 RIR (17178). He embarked for France from Bordon as a lance corporal in October 1915 and was reported wounded and subsequently, KIA in Belgium on the 16.8.17. His death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.Benson, JohnILC&LM
56BensonDavidPvt12284847MGC(I)SupportYR 45417MoiraStockton-on-TeesFranceCambraiKIA1918-03-23 00:00:00Metz-en-Couture Communal Cemetery, FranceBENSON, Private David. Born at Trummery, near Moira he enlisted at Stockton-on-Tees and was posted to the Yorkshire Regiment (45417). Subsequently transferred to the 47 MGC(I) (122848) he was KIA in France on the 23.3.18. He is buried in Metz-En-Couture Communal Cemetery British Extension, Pas de Calais, France, plot 3, row A, grave 1. There is not headstone inscription.
57BentleyJames EdwardPvt1742SIHIrishH'boroDublinDublinDublinFranceLensKIA1917-05-14 00:00:0022Philosophe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe, FranceBENTLEY, Private James Edward. Born at Hillsborough, he lived and enlisted in Dublin and serving in the SIH (1742). KIA in France on the 14.5.17 aged 22, he is buried in Philosophe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe, France, plot 1, row P, grave 3. He was the son of James Edward and Henrietta Sophie Bently of 11 Rialto Buildings, Dolphins Barn, Dublin.
58BerryWilliam JohnRm1726113RIRIrishH'boroLisburnH'boroH'boroFranceSommeDOW1916-06-29 00:00:0027Forceville Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceBERRY, Rifleman William John. Born and living in Culcavey? Hillsborough, Co. Down, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in C Company 13 RIR (17261). He DoW in France on the 29.6.16 aged 27 and is buried in Forceville Communal Cemetery Extension, France, plot 2, row A, grave 7. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of Mary and the late James Berry, of Culcavey, Hillsborough, Co. Down.Berry, WilliamJohnPat Geary/Lisburn.com As It Was
59BerryJamesLcpl1718013RIRIrishLarneLisburnCulcaveyFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceBERRY, Lance corporal James. Born in Larne, he lived at Culcavey, Hillsborough with his widowed mother. An “old cavalryman” he had joined the Dragoon Guards in 1899 and served in South Africa during the Boer War, subsequently becoming a drill instructor and completing 12 years service. By the time of the outbreak of war, he was an employee of the Hillsborough Linen Company and member of the Hillsborough Company of the U.V.F. He enlisted at Lisburn and served in 13 RIR (17180). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, while “advancing most gallantly with his Company to attack the German trenches”, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France. He was the son of Mrs. Berry of Hillsborough. Berry, JamesNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
60BertieJohnPvt68569BWScottishLisburnDundeeDundeeFranceLensKIA1915-09-25 00:00:0036Loos Memorial, FranceBERTIE, Private John. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Dundee and served in 9 BW (S/6856). KIA in France on the 25.9.15 aged 36, his death is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, France, panels 78-83. He was the husband of Ellen Bertie of 4 Parkers Court, King Street, Dundee.
61BickerstaffWilliamCpl19142RIRIrishDunmurryBelfastGermanyBerlinDied/PoW1918-07-01 00:00:00Berlin South Western Cemetery, Stahnsdorf, GermanyBICKERSTAFF, Corporal William. Born in Dunmurry, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 2 RIR (1914). Taken prisoner, he was a PoW when he died in Germany on the 1.7.18. He is buried in Berlin South-Western Cemetery, Berlin, Brandenburg, Germany, plot 1, row C, grave 5. In 1922-23 it was decided that the graves of Commonwealth servicemen who had died all over Germany should be brought together into four permanent cemeteries. Berlin South-Western was one of those chosen and in 1924-25 graves were brought into the cemetery from more than 140 burial grounds in eastern Germany.Bickerstaff, WilliamNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
62BlackHarold EdwardPvt18629878CEF MtbaRImperial90BallycastleWinnipegWinnipeg/BallycastleFranceRear1917-11-19 00:00:0023Etaples Military Cemetery, FranceBLACK, Private Harold Edward. Born in Ballycastle on the 11.6.1894, he was an old scholar of Friends' School Lisburn which he entered on the 5.5.08 and left on the 7.4.10. During this time his reports were generally "satisfactory". A custom clerk by profession, he enlisted at Winnipeg on the 7.9.1915 aged 21 years and 3 months. Height 5'10", chest fully expanded 36 1/2" with a 2 1/12" expansion, he had a fair complexion, greenish-grey eyes and dark brown hair. A single man, he gave his brother Robert of 11 Bartella Court, Home Street, Winnipeg as his next of kin. He had 1 years military experience with the 90th. Rifles H.D. and on enlistment was posted to the 90th. Canadian Infantry, "Winnipeg Rifles". Subsequently transferred to the 78 battalion Canadian Infantry, Manitoba Regiment (186298), he died on the 19.11.17 aged 23 and is buried in Etaples Military Cemetery, plot 30, row L, grave 23. He was the son of William Boyes and Sarah Jane Black whose family home was in Ballycastle.
63BlackWilliamRm59461RIRIrishBelfastBelfastDunmurryDunmurryBelgiumOtherDied/PoW/sickness1918-10-13 00:00:0023Dadizeele New Brit Cem, BelgiumBLACK, Rifleman William. Born at and enlisting in Belfast he lived at Ballycollier, Dunmurry. Serving in B Company 1 RIR (5946) he died of sickness in Belgium while a PoW on the 13.10.18 age 23. Buried by the Germans in Deerlyck German Cemetery, his grave was subsequently lost and his death is now commemorated in the Deerlyck German Cemetery memorial 3 in Dadizeele New British Cemetery, Belgium. The memorial, which is the same as the standard Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone has the inscription, "Gone but not forgotten". He was the son of Thomas and Mary Black of 12 Mill Row, Dunmurry, Co. Antrim.Black, WilliamNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
64BlackburnJohn AlexanderGnr18807RGASupportBelfastHomeAnnahiltDied1917-03-19 00:00:0032Annahilt Presbyterian ChurchyardBLACKBURN, Gunner John Alexander. Served in the RGA (18807) and died on the 19.3.17 aged 32. He is buried in Annahilt Presbyterian churchyard grave 467 beside Jeannie Blackburn who died on the 25.3.59. However, it is not clear what the relationship, if any, is. The headstone inscription reads, "This is the victory that overcometh the world even our fath. 1 John 5.4". He was the son of the late James and Catherine Blackburn.
65BlainEdwardPvt284201NZEF WRImperialMazeH'boroFranceRearDOW1917-07-03 00:00:00St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, FranceBLAIN, Private Edward. Of Lake View, Maze or Ballykeel, Artifinney, he served in 1 WR NZEF (28420) and DoW in France on the 3.7.17. Buried in St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France, block P, plot 2, row G, grave 4A, he was the brother of John Blain of Ballykeel, Artifinney, Hillsborough, Co. Down.
66BlakelyHerbert (Bertie)Cpl94377RInFIrishBelfastBallykinlarDunmurryFranceSommeKIA1916-09-09 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceBLAKELY, Corporal Herbert (Bertie). Born in Belfast, he lived in Dunmurry, enlisted at Ballykinlar and served in 7 RInF (9437). KIA on the Somme on the 9.9.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France Pier and Face 4 D and 5 B.
67BlakleySamuelRm59711RIRIrishTullynacrossBelfastTullynacrossFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceBLAKELY, Rifleman Samuel. Born and living in Hilden View, Tullynacross, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 11 RIR (597), embarking with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, face A and B.
68BoomerWilliamGnr3023604 BdeCEF CFAImperial67 OS Depot BtyDunmurryTorontoDerriaghyBelgiumYpresKIA1917-11-03 00:00:0026Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, BelgiumBOOMER, Gunner William. Born in Dunmurry on the 24.6.1891 and a "mechanical chauffeur" by profession, he enlisted at Toronto on the 25.9.1915 aged 24 years 3 months having had no previous military experience. Height 5'9 1/4" chest fully expanded 39 1/2" with 3 1/2" expansion, he had a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. He also had a 1 1/2" scar on his right elbow. Posted originally to the 67th. Overseas Depot Battery, CFA, CEF he subsequently served in the 4 Brigade CFA (302360). KIA in Belgium on the 3.11.17 aged 26 he is buried in Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, Belgium, plot 12, row E, grave 11. The HS inscription reads, "In loving memory". He was the son of William John and Elizabeth Boomer of Milltown, Derriaghy. According to the cemetery register, Vlamertinghe was just outside the range of enemy shell fire and was used by both artillery and field ambulance units.
69BoomerWalter CharterCpt12RIRIrishD Co 11 RIRLisburnBelgiumOtherDOW/KIA1918-10-01 00:00:0027Dadizeele New British Cemetery, BelgiumBOOMER, Captain Walter Charter, M.C. Educated at Friends’ School Lisburn, he was an officer in the 1st Lisburn Battalion of the UVF. He had enlisted in 11 RIR as a private shortly after it was formed but was commissioned on the 7 January 1915 and embarked for France from Bordon Camp as a 2nd. Lt. with D Co. 11 RIR in October 1915. Wounded four times before his death, once just prior to July 1916 as a result of which he may not have taken part in the attack at Thiepval on the 1.7.16, again in September and a third time in November 1916. On the last occasion his wounds were light and he returned to duty in the front line after being treated at a field dressing station. Writing back to his mother “from a sea of mud”, he made light of his wounds. However, in January or February 1917 he was hit in the right thigh by a bullet which had to be extracted and on this occasion had to spend time in hospital in London recovering. Promoted to Captain on the 20.7.17, he was awarded the MC in the autumn of 1917, “for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in command of his Company. When the assaulting troops were falling back he rallied them under very heavy fire, collected parties of other units, and reorganised the defence of the front line”. Home on sick leave suffering from malaria shortly before his death, he had been given a medical certificate “to be sent to the War Office but so eager was [he] to get back to duty that he did not wait for a reply, which arrived after he had gone up to the line, and exempted him from active service for some time longer”. He DoW on the 1.10.18 aged 27 at Becelaere, east of Ypres, while serving as a Captain with 12 RIR. He is buried in Dadizelle New British Cemetery, Belgium, plot 2, row D, grave 2, and commemorated on the family headstone in Lambeg Parish Church where the inscription reads, “Father in thy glorious keeping, leave we now thy servant sleeping”. He was the son of Jane Armstrong Boomer and Richard Walter Boomer who died on the 21st. August 1932 aged 84 and is buried at Lambeg. The family was of Huguenot descent and lived at Knockmore House, Lisburn. Boomer, WalterCharterILC&LM
70BostonWilliamRm91411RIRIrishDerbyshireBelfastFranceLensKIA1915-03-10 00:00:00Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg-l'Avoue, FranceBOSTON, Rifleman William. Born in Shirland, Derby, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RIR (9141). KIA in France on the 10.3.15, his death is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, France, panels 42 and 43.
71BothwellThomas HRm1549RIRIrishDromaraBelfastDunmurryFranceSommeKIA1916-06-04 00:00:00Authuile Military Cemetery, FranceBOTHWELL, Rifleman Thomas H. Born in Dromara, Co. Down, he lived at Mill Row, Dunmurry. Enlisting at Belfast, he served in 9 RIR (154) and was KIA on the Somme on the 4.6.16. He was buried at Authuile Military Cemetery, France, row C, grave 3, there is no headstone inscription.Bothwell, ThomasNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
72BothwellArthur WilliamPvt127576RInFIrishDromoreBelfastDromara/BelfastGreeceSalonicaDOW1916-09-13 00:00:0035Lembet Road Military Cemetery, GreeceBOTHWELL, Private Arthur William. Born in Dromore, Co. Down, he had served in the Boer War. Enlisting at Belfast he served in C Company 6 RInF (12757) and DoW in the Balkans on the 13.9.16 aged 35. Buried in Salonika (Lembet Road) Military Cemetery, Greece grave 396 he was the son of the late Jonathan and Agnes A. Bothwell of Derry, Dromara, Co. Down and husband of Mary Bothwell of 10 Ashfield Street, Belfast.
73BowersJamesRm115836RIRIrishBelfast or CaledonLisburnLambeg, TullynacrossLambeg, TullynacrossTurkeyGallipoli (at sea)DOW1915-08-12 00:00:0028East Mudros Military Cemetery, Lemnos, GreeceBOWERS, Rifleman James. Born either at Caledon, Co. Tyrone or at 15 McCleery Street, Belfast on the 10 August 1887, he was the son of John and Mary Ellen (O’Neill) Bowers. Sometime before 1911 he left home for Cumberland where he lived at 11 Prospect Terrace, Cleator.  He was 25 and working in a mill there when he met and married Mary Murphy a 21 year old from 20 Fletcher Street, Cleator Moor.  They were married in the Registry Office at Whitehaven on the 17 July 1911. Their first child Sarah was born on the 19 August 1911 after which the family moved back to Ireland where they were living at Tullynacross when their second child, Mary, was born on the 12 August 1914. She was baptised at Lisburn Cathedral and their address at the time was Mill View, Lambeg.

In April 1915 James Bowers enlisted at Lisburn as a rifleman (11583) in the 6 RIR and in May moved with his Battalion to Hackwood Park, Basingstoke for further training. After sailing for Mudros via Alexandria, they landed at Anzac Cove, Gallipoli on the 5 August 1915. At the time or shortly after he was wounded and died on board a hospital ship on the 12th August 1915. He is buried in East Mudros Military Cemetery, Lemnos, plot 2, row D, grave 63. On the 17 December 1915 his son, also James Bowers, was born at Tullynacross shortly after which Mary and her three children left Ireland and moved back to Cumberland.
74BowmanRobert2LtRIrFIrish14RIR (14/16254)Co. AntrimHilden, LisburnHildenHomeDied1920-11-11 00:00:0025Blaris Old Cemetery, LisburnBOWMAN, 2nd. Lieutenant Robert Moore. Served in the 81st Brigade RFA. KIA on the Somme on the 5.8.16 aged 21, he is buried in Carnoy Military Cemetery, France, row N, grave 34. The headstone inscription reads, "He died for freedom and honour". He was the son of Thomas Kynaston Bowman of 50 Hanover Gate Mansions, Regents Park, London.Bowman, RobertNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
75BoydAlexanderLcpl77842RIRIrishBallyclareBelfastRavarnetteFranceLensKIA1914-10-27 00:00:00Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg-l'Avoue, FranceBOYD, Lance corporal Alexander. Born in Ballyclare, he lived in Ravarnette, enlisted at Belfast and served in 2 RIR (7784). KIA in France on the 27.10.14, his death is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, France, panels 42 and 43.
76BoydDavidRm1729511RIRIrishLisburnLisburnMillbrook, LisburnMillbrook, LisburnFranceSommeDOW/KIA1916-07-01 00:00:0023Forceville Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceBOYD, Rifleman David. Born in Lisburn, he lived with his widowed mother at Millbrook, Lisburn. An organ Blower in Lisburn Cathedral, he worked at Glenmore. Enlisting at Lisburn he served in D Company 11 RIR (17295), with whom he embarked for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 23 he is buried in Forceville Communal Cemetery and Extension, Forceville, France, plot 2, row A, grave 14 next to Adam Clarke (below). There is no headstone inscription.
77BoydWilliamSgt417122 BdeCEF CFAImperialCo. DonegalQuebecCrumlinFranceArrasKIA1917-05-07 00:00:0033La Targette British Cemetery, Neuville-St-Vaast, FranceBOYD, Farrier Sergeant William. Born in Co. Donegal on the 29.3.1884, he had been a member of the Orange Order in Glenavy, and enlisted at Quebec on the 26.9.14 aged 30. A farrier by occupation, he had by this time had 4 years “Imperial service” and 7 years and 3 months “Canadian service”. A single man, he was 5’ 11½” tall with a 39” chest (including 4½” expansion) and had a fair complexion with brown eyes and black hair. He was KIA on the 7.5.17 aged 33 while serving in 2 Brigade CFA (41712). In a letter to his father, Major Alderson wrote, “Sergeant Boyd was in charge of three wagons carrying material to the gun position, when the enemy opened up on the road they were taking. He was hit by a splinter and his death was instantaneous. I sympathise with you very much in your loss, a loss in which the officers and men of this Battery have a share. He was very popular with all ranks, and his death has caused a gap which we all feel will not be easily filled”. Buried in La Targette British Cemetery, Neuville-St.-Vaast, Pas de Calais, France, plot 2, row A, grave 8, he was the son of William Boyd of Main Street, Crumlin, Co. Antrim and brother of CSM James Boyd, above. Boyd, WilliamPat Geary/FindaGrave.com
78BoydHenryLt100 SqdnRAFAir ForceUSAFranceOther/Eastern France?KIA1918-08-26 00:00:0019Charmes Military Cemetery, FranceBOYD, Lieutenant Henry. Served in 100 Squadron R.A.F. He was KIA in France on 26.8.18 aged 19 and is buried in Charmes Military Cemetery, France, plot 1, row B, grave 2. He was the son of William A. and M or N Boyd of Hollway Drive, Santa Cruz, California, U.S.A.
79BoydJamesCSM2013550CEF RCEImperialBelfastCanada, St. JohnsCanada, St. JohnsCrumlinCanadaOtherDied/pneumonia1918-10-02 00:00:0026St. Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec, CanadaBOYD, CSM James. Born in Belfast on the 29 July 1892 he was a single man and blacksmith by trade with three years experience in the RCE. Possibly a member of the Orange Order in Glenavy, he lived at St John’s P.Q., Canada and enlisted there on the 1 July 1918. With a ruddy complexion, grey eyes and brown hair, he was 5’ 8½” tall and had a 38½“ chest with a 4” expansion. He was posted to the Canadian Engineers (2013550) but died shortly after of pneumonia on the 2 October 1918 age 26 and is buried in St. Jean-sur-Richelieu (St. James) cemetery, Quebec, grave 106. Given the date of his enlistment and the date and place of his death it is unlikely that he ever left Canada after joining up. He was the youngest son of William and Isabella Boyd of Main Street, Crumlin, Co. Antrim and brother of Farrier Sergeant William Boyd, below. Boyd, JamesPat Geary/FindaGrave.com
80BoydThomas Moffatt (George)LtRAMCSupportCastleblaneyAfricaMozambiqueDied/dysentry1918-10-25 00:00:00Lumbo Brirish Cemetery, MozambiqueBOYD, Lieutenant Thomas Moffatt (George). Born in Castleblaney, he was an old scholar of Friends' School Lisburn. He died of dysentery while on active service with the RAMC in Mozambique, East Africa on the 25.10.18 and is buried in Lumbo British Cemetery, Mozambique, plot 1, row B, grave 8. He was a brother of Joseph Boyd, late cashier in the Ulster Bank, Lisburn. A brass tablet mounted on oak was erected to him in Ballybay Presbyterian Church. Ballybay lies west of Castleblaney and south of Monaghan.
81BradleyGeorgeSgt206144MGC(T)SupportMGC 17709LisburnBelfastBelfastFranceOtherDOW1917-05-03 00:00:0026Mory Abbey Military Cemetery, FranceBRADLEY, Sergeant George, MM. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in the MGC (17709). Subsequently transferred to MGC(T) (206144), he DoW in France on the 3.5.17 aged 26 and is buried in Mory Abbey Military Cemetery, France, plot 1, row D, grave 1. He was the son of Robert and Margaret Bradley of 34 Greenmount Villa, Henderson Avenue, Belfast.
82BraithwaiteJamesCSM7141MREnglishLambegBelfastLisburnLisburn/ManchesterMiddle EastMesopotamiaKIA1916-03-08 00:00:0033Basra Memorial, IraqBRAITHWAITE, CSM James. Born in Lambeg, he had a Lisburn address. An “old” soldier with nine years experience and a gymnasium instructor, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 MR (714). Listed as missing at Kut in Mesopotamia (Iraq) from the 8 March 1916, his parents were informed in May that he was a PoW in Constantinople. By June/July it was reported that he was wounded although subsequent references to him were to the effect that he was missing. Eventually, in February 1918 “after almost a year’s anxiety and doubt” the War Office informed his parents that he was considered to have been KIA in Mesopotamia on the 8.3.16 aged 33. His death is commemorated on the Basra Memorial, Iraq. He was the third son of Samuel and Eleanor Braithwaite of 56 Millbrook, Low Road, Lisburn and husband of Alice Braithwaite of Junction Cottage, Ashton-under-Lyne and 22 Barkwell Lane, Mossley, Manchester. They had two young children. Samuel Braithwaite was “a prominent member of the Rechabite fraternity”.

Although James Braithwaite is officially recorded as having been KIA, the fact that he was at one point reported to be a PoW in Constantinople (see above) raises the question of whether in fact he had, and what had actually happened to him. Whatever it was, it is difficult to imagine that it could have been worse that the fate that befell his colleagues. On the 29 April 1916, the garrison at Kut, which had been under siege since the 5 December 1915, surrendered to the Turks. Sometime between then and the 6 May a “veritable death march” began as the captives were led north towards Anatolia “without any concern whatsoever for their well-being, or for their helpless status as prisoners-of-war” (Martin Gilbert, “The First World War” p.’s 247-8). Deprived of food and water, and beaten and whipped by those who guarded them, 2500 Indian and 1750 British prisoners were to perish on the way.

Three of James Braithwaite’s brothers also saw active service. CSM Samuel Braithwaite had served with the Lincolnshire Regiment in the Boer War and held both the King’s and Queen’s medals. He lived at 10 Ivan Street in the town with his wife and three children. A Sergeant Instructor in the 1st. Lisburn battalion of the UVF, he served in 11 RIR (17203), embarking with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. In May 1917 he was awarded the Ulster Division Parchment for gallantry in the field. This was “for organizing parties in Thiepval Wood on the 23 June 1916 to rescue men buried by shell fire. He set a splendid example to his men and was himself severely wounded”. Sergeant Rene Braithwaite, who lived at 56 Millbrook, Low Road, Lisburn with his parents, served in the Cable Section, Royal Engineers. An “old soldier” with 20 years service, he had been on his way home “time expired” when the war started and promptly re-enlisted. He was awarded the D.C.M. in late 1916/early 1917. Acccording to the citation the decoration was for, “conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty … establishing and maintaining communications throughout operations, … repeatedly repairing wires in the open under heavy fire”. William L. Braithwaite, the youngest of the four, was a leading signalman on a R.N. Dreadnought. James Braithwaite’s three brothers all appear to have survived the War.
83BrattyGeorgePvt226799RInFIrishLisburnMoyFranceRearDOW1916-07-17 00:00:00St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, FranceBRATTY, Private George. Born in Lisburn, where he lived at 12 Barrack Lane with his wife and three small children, he was employed by the Inland Navigation Company. He enlisted at Moy, Co. Tyrone and served in 9 RInF (22679). He DoW in France on the 17.7.16 and is buried in St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, France, plot A, row 30, grave 10.
84BrownCharlesRm94721RIRIrishBallymacarrettBelfastLisburnFranceLensKIA1915-03-13 00:00:00Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg-l'Avoue, FranceBROWN, Rifleman Charles. Born in Ballymacarrett, Belfast, he lived in Lisburn, enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RIR (9472). KIA in France on the 13.3.15, his death is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, France, panels 42/3.
85BrownHenryRm49171RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLambegBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1915-05-09 00:00:0022Ploegsteert Memorial, BelgiumBROWN, Rifleman Henry. Born in Blaris Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 1 RIR (4917). Reported missing and subsequently KIA in Belgium on the 9.5.15 aged 22, his death is commemorated on Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium, panel 9. He was the son of John and Catherine Brown, (nee Britton), who lived at 22 Cottage Row, Lambeg, and may have been a brother of John Brown (11 RIR) below. On the 9 April a letter appeared in the Standard from, “a few Lisburn chaps at the front” who had been involved in the fighting at Neuve Chapelle. The signatories were Riflemen R. Smith, Sharkey, Cree, and Brown of 1 RIR and Private Love of the ELR. They had written to express their sympathies with the family of Jack Kirkwood (see above) who had died on the 23 March. Private Love (or Lovie as he appears on Lisburn War Memorial) was probably Henry Topping who seems to have been using his mother’s name. Five weeks later on the 14 May another letter from “the lads of Lisburn now at the front” appeared. In it they thanked “the girls of the Railway Hotel Lisburn” for comforts they had sent out. By the time that it was published, Henry Topping, East Lancs, Robert Smith and Henry Brown who were all signatories, were dead. None has a known grave and like Henry Brown, Henry Topping and Robert Smith are commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial in Belgium. One implication of these letters is that groups of men from the town who served in different battalions actually met, presumably when they were off duty.
86BrownMartinCSM114917RIRIrishLisburnBelfastBelfastHomeLisburnDied1916-03-22 00:00:0052Blaris Old Cemetery, LisburnBROWN, CSM Martin. Born in Lisburn, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 17 RIR (1149). Dieing at home on the 22.3.16 aged 52, he is buried in Blaris Old Cemetery, Lisburn. His wife, Mrs. M. Brown lived at 94 Marlborough Park, Belfast.
87BrownJohnRm11.98511RIRIrishRenfrewBelfastLisburnRenfrew/LisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-06-28 00:00:0021Puchevillers British Cemetery, FranceBROWN, Rifleman John. Born at Thornliebank, Renfrew, he lived in Lisburn, Co. Antrim and before the war was employed at Hilden Dye Works. He enlisted at Belfast and served in 11 RIR (11/985), embarking with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. KIA in France on the 28.6.16 aged 21, he is buried in Puchevillers British Cemetery, France, plot 1, row A, grave 5. He was the son of John and Catherine Brown of Thornliebank, Renfrewshire and the Low Road, Lisburn and possibly brother of Henry Brown (1 RIR) above.
88BrownEdmundRm219211RIRIrishCarnmoneyLisburnGreenhill, LambegTullynacrossFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0020Thiepval Memorial, FranceBROWN, Rifleman Edmund. Born in Carnmoney, he lived at Greenhill, Lambeg. Before the war he worked as a flaxdresser in the York Street Flax Spinning Company, Belfast and may have been a member of Lisnagarvey Hockey Club. An Orangeman in Hilden True Blues LOL 594 he also belonged to the UVF. Enlisting at Lisburn he served in B Company 11 RIR (2192) and embarked with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 20, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A/B. Husband of Mary Brown of 3 Sandymount, Tullynacross, Lambeg, they had five children. He also had a brother who served in 11 RIR, a brother-in-law who had been killed earlier in the war and another who had been wounded.
89BrownGeorgePvt17678MGC(I)SupportRIR 19404RandalstownAntrimCrosshillFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Connaught Cemetery, Thiepval, FranceBROWN, Private George. Born in Randalstown, he lived in Crosshill, Co. Antrim. A member of the Orange Order in Glenavy, he enlisted at Antrim and served in the RIR (19404). He may have embarked for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915 as a rifleman with 11 RIR and subsequently transferred to 108 Company MGC(I) (17678). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 he is buried in Connaught Cemetery, plot 2, row L, grave 8. There is no headstone inscription.
90BrownWilliam JamesRm2849RIRIrishAntrimBelfastLambegFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0018Thiepval Memorial, FranceBROWN, Rifleman William James. Born in Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 9 RIR (284). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 age 18, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A and B. He was the son of Mrs. Agnes J Thompson of Mosside Hill, Lambeg, Lisburn.
91BrownJamesRm473111RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceBelgian borderDOW/gas1916-09-02 00:00:0020Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceBROWN, Rifleman James. Born in Lisburn, he lived in Connolly Row. He enlisted in the town and served in 11 RIR (4731), embarking for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. He DoW from gas in France on the 2.9.16 aged 20 and is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, France, (close to the Franco-Belgium frontier) plot 2, row F, grave 196. There is no headstone inscription. His father, Samuel Brown, lived at 35 Sprucefield, Lisburn, Co. Down.
92BrownJohnCpl125618RIRIrishLisburnBelfastBelgiumMessinesDOW1917-06-07 00:00:00Dranoutre Military Cemetery, BelgiumBROWN, Corporal John. Born in Lisburn, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 8 RIR (12561). DoW in Belgium on the 7.6.17, he is buried in Dranoutre Military Cemetery, Belgium, plot 1, row J, grave 33. There is no headstone inscription.
93BrownEdwardLt2RIRIrish18 RIRLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-07 00:00:0025The Huts Cemetery, Dickebusch, BelgiumBROWN, Lieutenant Edward. He lived at Pond Park, Lisburn, and was a member of Lisnagarvey Hockey Club and goalkeeper for the 1st. XI. Before the war he had been employed for seven years at Messrs. William Heney & Co., Brunswick Street, Belfast, and was manager of Messrs. R. McBride & Co. finishing and stitching works in Alfred Street, Belfast. A member of the South Antrim Volunteers, UVF he was signaling instructor at the Old Town Hall. Commissioned on the 16 November 1914 and promoted to Lieutenant on the 1 April 1916, he served for a time with 11 RIR although he did not embark with them for France in October 1915. Subsequently posted to 18 RIR, and attached to 2 RIR, he was slightly wounded by shrapnel during the attack on the Messines Ridge on the 7.6.17, taking over command of his company after his Captain was hit. KIA by a grenade near Ypres on the 7 August 1917 aged 25 his bodied was carried back to the British lines where he was buried in the Huts Cemetery, Dickebusch, Belgium, plot 2, row B, grave 13. His headstone inscription reads, "Make them to be numbered with thy saints in glory everlasting". The eldest son of Robert and Mary Brown of Pond Park, Lisburn, Robert Brown was manager of Messrs. R. McBride & Co.’s works at Alfred Street, Belfast. The Huts Cemetery was near gun positions and nearly two thirds of the soldiers in it were gunners. Its name comes from the fact that there was a long line of huts along the road beside the cemetery which were used to accommodate field ambulances. His cousin, Second Lieutenant William Gordon Curry who lived at North Parade, Belfast? and served in 12 CR was KIA in Belgium on the 7 June 1917 while serving with 13 CR. He is buried in Wulverghem-Lindenhoek Road Military Cemetery, Heuvelland, Belgium plot 2, row G, garve 9. Brown, EdwardNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
94BrownAdamDvrTH/0453502021-04-01 00:00:00NFEnglishRASCHannahstownBelfastDunmurryHannahstownFranceRearDied/influenza1918-11-04 00:00:0024Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille, FranceBROWN, Driver Adam. Born in Hannahstown, Co. Antrim, address Dunmurry. He enlisted at Belfast, served in the RASC (TH/045350) and was attached to 1/4 NLR. Reported as suffering from shell shock in February 1917, he died of influenza in France 4.11.18 age 24. Buried in Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille, Pas de Calais, France, plot 7, row C, grave 1. He was the son of James and Eliza Jane Brown of Torneroy, Hannahstown, Belfast.
95BrownGeorgePvt82623MGCSupportRSF 28812LisburnBelfastLisburnMiddle EastPalestineDied/pneumonia1918-12-02 00:00:00Ramleh War Cemetery, Jerusalem
96Brown(e)SamuelRm686111.13RIRIrish11RIRBlarisLisburnFranceCambraiKIA/shrapnel?1917-12-02 00:00:00Metz-en-Couture Communal Cemetery, FranceBROWN, Rifleman Samuel. Born in Blaris, he enlisted at Lisburn and served originally in 11 RIR with which he embarked for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Subsequently transferred to 11/13 RIR (6861) when the 11th and 13th battalions were amalgamated in August 1917, he was KIA “by shrapnel through the heart” at Cambrai on the 2.12.17 and is buried in Metz-en-Couture Communal Cemetery, British Extension, France, plot 3, row C, grave 7. There is no headstone inscription. In a letter to the mother of Jonathan Reddick (see below), who also served in 11 RIR and died the same day, the Chaplain explained how, “Early in the afternoon of the 2nd [December] the battalion came under heavy shell fire”.
97BruceThomas ErnestRm1627415RIRIrish14RIRDunmurryBelfastDunmurryDunmurryBelgiumOtherDOW1918-10-20 00:00:0022Harlebeke New British Cemetery, BelgiumBRUCE, Rifleman Thomas Ernest M.M. Born and living in Dunmurry he was a member of Derriaghy LOL 135 and was employed as an apprentice draughtsman at Harland and Wolff in Belfast. He enlisted at Belfast and served in either 14 or 15 RIR (16274). Reported wounded in September 1917, possibly at Langemarck, the previous month, he DoW in Belgium on the 20.10.18 age 22, having served for over four years. He may originally have been buried in Lendelede Cemetery, near Courtrai, Belgium, however, he is now interred in Harlebeke New British Cemetery, Harelbeke, Belgium, plot 3, row C, grave 1. His death is also commemorated on the family headstone in Lambeg Parish Church Cemetery. The only son of Charlotte Rebecca and Thomas Bruce Jr. of Woodview, Dunmurry, his mother had died on the 17.6.16 age 53, his father forty four years later on the 22.3.60 aged 94. Bruce, ThomasErnestPat Geary/Tom Henderson
98BruceWilliamRm1720412RIRIrish11 RIRDunmurryLisburnCultra/DunmurryBelfastBelgiumOtherDOW1918-10-23 00:00:0024Harlebeke New British Cemetery, BelgiumBRUCE, Rifleman William. Born in Dunmurry, Co. Antrim, he lived in Cultra, Co. Down or Dunmurry and was employed in the stockroom at the York Street Flax Spinning Company in Belfast. He was also a member of LOL 136 Mosside and of the South Antrim Volunteers (UVF) from which he enlisted in the army at Lisburn in 1914. He embarked for France from Bordon with 11 RIR in October 1915 and was reported wounded in late August/early September 1916, possibly while in action on the Somme on 1.7.16. He survived but subsequently DoW in Belgium on the 23.10.18 age 24 while serving in 12 RIR (17204) to which he would have been transferred after 11 were disbanded. Buried in Harlebeke New British Cemetery, Belgium, plot 2, row C, grave 3, he was the son of John and Frances Cosby Bruce of Kilmakee, Dunmurry and husband of Mary Jane Bruce of Edgebank, Deramore Park South, Belfast.Bruce, WilliamNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
99BryansJames HenryRm1627313RIRIrishH'boroBelfastBanbridgeFranceSommeKIA1916-05-10 00:00:00Authuile Military Cemetery, FranceBRYANS, Rifleman James Henry. Born in Ballyknock, Hillsborough, Co. Down, he lived in Banbridge, Co. Down, enlisted at Belfast and served in 13 RIR (16273). KIA in France on the 10.5.16, he is buried in Authuile Military Cemetery, France, row G, grave 10. There is no headstone inscription.
100BrysonSamuelLcpl663311RIRIrishDromaraLisburnDromaraFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceBRYSON, Lance corporal Samuel. Born and living in Dromara, Co. Down, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 11 RIR (6633), with which he embarked from Bordon Camp for France in October 1915. KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A and B.
101BuchananRichardPvt505451.6NSREnglishRASC T/32714DrumbegNewtownardsLisburn/BelfastLambegFranceLensKIA1918-05-02 00:00:00Beuvry Communal Cemetery, FranceBUCHANAN, Private Richard, M.M. Born in Drumbeg, he lived in Lisburn and Belfast, enlisted at Newtownards and served originally in the RASC (T/32714) before being transferred to 1/6 NSR 50545. Awarded the M.M. for “conspicuous service in action”, he was KIA in France on the 2.5.18. Buried in Beuvry Communal Extension, Pas de Calais, France, plot 2, row C, grave 4, he was the husband of Cissie and father of Florence May Buchanan of Sandy Lane, Lambeg, Lisburn, Co. Antrim. An In Memoriam notice in the Herald for the 3 May 1919 read, “You never shunned your country’s call, But gladly gave your life – your all; You died the helpless to defend, A British soldier to the end. Sadly mourned by his wife and little child”.
102BuckleyJoseph SCpl110552RIrFIrishLisburnArmaghLisburnBelgiumYpresDOW1915-05-10 00:00:0019Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumBUCKLEY, Corporal Joseph S. Born and living in Lisburn, he enlisted in 1912 at Armagh when he was 16 and served in 2 RIrF (11055). He had been at the front since the start of the war and was involved in the retreat from Mons during which he was wounded and for a time reported MIA. Wounded again on the knee by shrapnel at Armentieres, he was hospitalised for a short time before going home to Lisburn on leave for a few days at Christmas 1914. This time was spent with his mother and brothers. Slightly wounded for a third time by shrapnel to the head on March 18, he was hit again by shrapnel on the 10 May and only lived for about an hour after reaching a field hospital. He DoW at Hooge in Belgium on the 10.5.15 aged 19 and his death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate Memorial, Belgium, panel 40. His family, in which he was the third son, lived on the Belsize Road, Lisburn and had a strong military tradition. His father the late Sergeant Major Richard Buckley had served for eighteen years with the Lancashire Fusiliers mostly in India. On retiring from the army he had become manager for Samuel F. McConnell, solicitor of Lisburn. He had died about 1905. His (Joseph’s) maternal grandfather, William John May was also a soldier. He had served through the Crimea War and Indian Mutiny and had died at Lisburn in about 1912. One of his brothers, John Buckley, who before the war he had been on the staff of the Director of Works, served in the Dardanelles from August 1915 but was invalided home by hospital ship on the 25 November.
103BurkeFrederick GeorgeSgt1413711RIRIrishTullynacrossBelfastLambegHildenFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0023Thiepval Memorial, FranceBURKE, Sergeant Frederick George. Born in Tullynacross, Co. Down, he lived at Lambeg, Co. Antrim. He enlisted at Belfast and served in 11 RIR (14137), embarking with them for France from Bordon as a lance sergeant in October 1915. Listed as wounded and missing and subsequently, in May or June 1917, confirmed as having been KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 23, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A/B. He was the second son of Mr. and Mrs. George Burke, 2 Grafton Crescent, Hilden, Lisburn, Co. Antrim and brother of Percy Burke, below. A third brother Private Ivan Burke was wounded and in October 1918 was in Netley Hospital in England.
104BurkePercyCpl52612RIRIrishLambegLisburnHildenBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1918-09-06 00:00:0022Ploegsteert Memorial, BelgiumBURKE, Corporal Percy. Born in Lambeg, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 2 RIR (5261). Having served in "France" since September 1914, he was KIA in Belgium on the 6.9.18 aged 22, his death is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium, panel 9. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. George Burke of 2 Grafton Crescent, Hilden, Lisburn, Co. Antrim and brother of Frederick George Burke, above. A third brother Private Ivan Burke was wounded and in October 1918 was in Netley Hospital in England.Burke, PercyPat Geary/Eddys Extracts LS19181011
105BurnsFrankCpl94021RInFIrishLisburnBelfastEgyptGallipoliDOW1915-06-07 00:00:00Chatby Military War and Memorial Cemetery, Alexandria, EgyptBURNS, Corporal Frank. Born in Lisburn, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RInF (9402). He DoW received at Gallipoli on the 7.6.15 and is buries in Alexandira (Chatby) Military and War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt, row M, grave 123.
106BurnsWilliamRm12489RIRIrishDerriaghyBelfastBelfastBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-08 00:00:0026Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumBURNS, Rifleman William. Born in Derriaghy, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 9 RIR (1248). KIA in Belgium on the 8.8.17 aged 26, his death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate Memorial, Belgium, panel 40. He was the son of William Burns of "Willowbank", Knockbreda Road, Cregagh, Belfast.
107BurtonJamesPvt124896RIrFIrishLisburnLisburnAt sea/TurkeyGallipoliDOW1915-08-09 00:00:00Helles Memorial, GallipoliBURTON, Private James. Born in and enlisted at Lisburn, Co. Antrim, he served in 6 RIrF (12489). Wounded at Gallipoli, he died at sea on the 9.8.15. His death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panels 177-8.
108BurtonRobertPvt4709810KOSBScottishRIR 686DrumboBelfastBelfastFranceBelgian borderKIA1918-10-12 00:00:00Erquinghem-Lys Churchyard Extension, FranceBURTON, Private Robert. Born in Drumbo, Co. Down, he lived and enlisted at Belfast, served originally in RIR (686) and subsequently transferring to 10 KOSB (47098). KIA in France on the 12.10.18, he is buried in Erquinghem-Lys Churchyard Extension, Nord, France, plot 3, row G, grave 1.
109BurtonRRm60235318LIREnglishLisburnHomeLisburnDOW/sickness1921-04-10 00:00:0021Lisburn CemeteryBURTON, Rifleman R. Served in the 18 London Irish Rifles (602353). Wounded in "France" on the 7 September 1917, he died of sickness on the 10.4.21 aged 21 and is buried in Lisburn Cemetery, new section, plot E, grave 238. The headstone inscription reads, “Thy will be done”. He was the son of Robert and Mary Burton of 91 Longstone Street, Lisburn. His brother Rifleman W. Burton was reported to be suffering from “fever” in Salonica in October 1917. He appears to have survived.
110BusheSamuelRm479611RIRIrishGlenavyClandeboyeBelfastCrumlinFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0036Thiepval Memorial, FranceBUSHE, Rifleman Samuel. Born in Glenavy, Co. Antrim, he lived in Crumlin and Belfast, enlisted at Clandeboye, and served in D Company 11 RIR (4796). Listed as missing and subsequently KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 age 36, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A and B. The son of the late Mrs. Ellen Ferris, his wife Emily Bushe lived at 20 Helen Street, Crumlin.
111CairnsAlexPvt106354CEF CORImperialLisburnCanadaLisburnFranceRear/YpresDOW1915-04-30 00:00:0022Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, FranceCAIRNS, Private Alex. Born in Lisburn on the 3.5.1892. A single man and barber by profession, he enlisted at Valcartier in Canada on the 22.9.1914 aged 22 years and 4 months having had no previous military experience. He was 5’ 6¾” tall, and had a 35” chest (fully expanded) with a 2½” expansion. He had a dark complexion with brown eyes and dark brown hair and had a scar under his right ear. He served in 4th battalion CEF, 1st. COR (10635) and DoW in hospital on the 30.4.15 aged 22 (three days before his 23rd. birthday) from wounds received near Ypres. Buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, France, plot 8, row B, grave 16, he was the fourth son of James and Mrs. D Cairns of 2 Ava Street, Lisburn. Cairns, AlexNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
112CairnsEdwardCpl1739111RIRIrishDerriaghyLisburnDunmurryDunmurryFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Mill Road Cemetery, Thiepval, FranceCAIRNS, Corporal Edward. Born in Derriaghy, he lived in Mosside, Dunmurry, was a member of Mosside LOL 136, of Derriaghy Band and of the South Antrim Battalion of the UVF. Having enlisted at Lisburn he served in 11 RIR (17391), and embarked with them for France from Bordon in October 1915 along with his brothers Samuel and Thomas Cairns. Listed as missing and subsequently, in May or June 1917, as KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, he is buried in Mill Road, Cemetery, France, plot 14, row E, grave 8. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of Mrs. Cairns a widow, of Mosside, Dunmurry and brother of Thomas James Cairns, below. Samuel Cairns who also served in 11 RIR appears to have survived the war. Cairns, EdwardNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
113CairnsRobertLcpl11313RIRIrishDunmurryBanbridgeDonaghcloneyFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceCAIRNS, Lance Corporal Robert. Born in Dunmurry, Co. Antrim, he lived in Dunacloney Co. Down, enlisted at Banbridge and served in 13 RIR (113). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France Pier and Face 15 A and 15 B.
114CairnsThomas JamesSgt1738911RIRIrishDerriaghyLisburnDunmurryDunmurryFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceCAIRNS, Sergeant Thomas James. Born in Derriaghy, Co. Antrim, he lived in Dunmurry, was secretary of Sommerhill LOL 137, a member of Derriaghy Band and of the South Antrim Battalion of the UVF. He enlisted at Lisburn in 11 RIR (17389) and embarked with them for France from Bordon in October 1915 along with his brothers Samuel and Thomas Cairns. Listed as missing and subsequently, in May or June 1917, as KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15A/B. He was the son of Mrs. Cairns, a widow, of Mosside, Dunmurry and brother of Edward Cairns, above. Samuel Cairns who also served in 11 RIR appears to have survived the war. Cairns, ThomasJamesNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
115CairnsWilliamRm221813RIRIrishLambegLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceCAIRNS, Rifleman William (Willie). Born in Lambeg, Co. Antrim, and a member of LOL 712, he enlisted at Lisburn shortly after the outbreak of the war and served in 13 RIR (2218). Reported as wounded in August 1916 and missing in late October or early November 1916, he was subsequently, in September 1917, confirmed as having been KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16. His death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15A/B. He was the third or fourth son of William J. Cairns of 127 Gregg Street, Lisburn. On the 22 September 1917 his parents had the following poem included along with a death notice in the Herald. “The stroke was great, the blow severe, To part with one we loved so dear; It was God’s will it should be so, At his command we all must go”. His sister and brother-in-law Emily and Jack Connolly, also of 127 Gregg Street, Lisburn, inserted the following in the same issue. “Our hearts were sore at parting, From him we loved so well; But we know his soul has gone to join, The Redeemed in Heaven to dwell”. Jack Connolly was also on active service as were two of William Cairn’s brothers. One, Rm. James Cairns, above was KIA in France on the 21.9.17. The other, Robert Cairns who served with 13 RIR, was in North Hampshire War Hospital in August or early September 1917, recovering from wounds. Both he and Jack Connolly seem to have survived the war.
116CairnsJamesRm18/31211RIRIrishLisburnLisburnFranceCambraiKIA1917-09-21 00:00:00Metz-en-Couture Communal Cemetery, FranceCAIRNS, Rifleman James. Enlisting at Lisburn he served in 11 RIR (18/312) or 12 RIR (312). Reported wounded in late September, early October 1916, he was KIA in France on the 21.9.17, and is buried in Metz-en-Couture Communal Cemetery, British Extension, France, plot 2, row C, grave 20. There is no headstone inscription. He was the second son of William John Cairns of 127 Gregg Street, Lisburn and husband of Hannah Cairns of 10 Ballynahinch Road, Lisburn. They had a child. On the 6.10.17 his wife included the following poem in the Herald along with his death notice. “He fought for home and those he loved, And for his country’s right; Until we meet in heaven above, My dearest one good night”. Two of his brothers also saw active service. Rifleman William Cairns, below, who was KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 and Robert Cairns who served with 13 RIR. In August or early September 1917 he was in North Hampshire War Hospital recovering from wounds. He seems to have survived the war.
117CalvertAlexanderRm30517RIRIrishLisburnBelfastHomeBelfastDied1915-05-30 00:00:00Belfast City CemeteryCALVERT, Rifleman Alexander. Born in Lisburn, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 17 RIR (305). He died at home on the 30.5.15 and is buried in Belfast City Cemetery, plot F, grave 705.
118CampbellJohnCptEL?EnglishKIA1916-07-02 00:00:00CAMPBELL, Lieutenant/Captain John. From Belfast, he served in the ELR and was KIA on the 1 or 2.7.16. His death is commemorated on Sloan Street, Presbyterian Church and possibly Hilden War Memorial, but there is no positive trace so far.
119CampbellJosephRm122298RIRIrishLisburnBelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-07-02 00:00:0050Thiepval Memorial, FranceCAMPBELL, Rifleman Joseph. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in A Company 8 RIR (12229). KIA on the Somme on the 2.7.16 aged 50, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, face A/B. He was the son of William Campbell and husband of Martha Campbell.
120CampbellJamesCSM48427RIRIrishBlarisBelfastPortadownBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-09 00:00:00Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumCAMPBELL, CSM James. Born in Blaris, Co. Antrim, he lived in Portadown, enlisted in Belfast and served in 7 RIR (4842). KIA in Belgium on the 9.8.17, his death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate Memorial, Belgium, panel 40.
121CampbellWilliamPvt174011CHScottishLisburnHamilton, LanarkshireMossend, GlasgowLanarkshireHomeLanarkshireDied1917-10-01 00:00:0028Bothwell Cemetery, LanarkshireCAMPBELL, Private William. Born in Lisburn, he lived in Mossend, Glasgow. He enlisted at Hamilton, Lanarkshire and served in 1 CH (17401) and died at home on the 1.10.17 aged 28. Buried in Bothwell (Bellshill) Cemetery, Lanarkshire, Scotland, row A, grave 617, he was the husband of Margaret Campbell of 28 Beechwood Gardens, Calder Road, Mossend.
122CampbellJohnLcpl382202RBREnglishLisburnIlfordIlfordFranceSommeDOW1918-04-06 00:00:00Coix-Molignaux Memorial, Ham British Cemetery, Muille-Villette, FranceCAMPBELL, Lance corporal John. Born in Lisburn, he lived and enlisted at Ilford, Essex and served in 2 RBR (38220). Reported missing, believed dead and subsequently DoW in France on the 6.4.18, his death is commemorated on the Croix-Molignaux German Cemetery Memorial, Ham British Cemetery, Muille-Villette, France.
123CareySylvesterRm61781RBEnglishWidnesSt. HelensSt. HelensSt. Helens/LambegFranceKIA1914-08-26 00:00:0050Beauvois-en-Cambresis Communal Cemetery, France CAREY, Rifleman Sylvester. Born in Widnes, Lancashire, he had served in the Boer War. He lived and enlisted in St. Helens, Lancashire and served in 1 RB (6178). KIA in France on the 26.8.14 age 50, he is buried in Beauvois-En-Cambresis Communal Cemetery, Nord, France, on the east side. He was the son of John J. and Catherine Carey of St. Helens, Lancashire and husband of Jane Carey of Sandy Lane, Lambeg, Co. Antrim. In August 1914 the girls' school of Beauvois-en-Cambresis where he is buried was used by the Germans to accommodate British wounded.
124CareyThomas James/JohnLcpl86615AEFImperialLisburnQueenslandBrisbaneTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-05-10 00:00:00Beach Cemetery, Anzac, Spec. Mem. 1
125CathcartThomasLcpl255811RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceCATHCART, Lance corporal Thomas Jnr. Born at Blaris and resident in Lisburn, before the war he worked for William Barbour and Sons and was a member of the UVF. He enlisted at Lisburn and served in D Company 11 RIR (2558), embarking as a rifleman for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A/B. His father and brother were also in 11 RIR and he had two uncles "serving in colours". Nephew of Miss A. Nelson of 62 Chapel Hill, Lisburn.
126CathcartDavidSgt1742411RIRIrishBelfastLisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1916-09-01 00:00:0024Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumCATHCART, Sergeant David. Born in Belfast, possibly at Ballysillan, he lived at 87 Ballynahinch Road, Lisburn. A member of Lisburn Conservative Flute Band and Lisburn Mechanics LOL 557, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 11 RIR (17424), possibly embarking with them from Bordon Camp for France as a corporal in October 1915. KIA in Belgium on the 1.9.16 aged 24, he had just returned to the front having been in Lisburn a few weeks previously with a recruiting party. His death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate Memorial, Belgium, panel 40. The son of James and Sarah Cathcart of 87 Ballynahinch Road, Lisburn, Co. Antrim, a spinning master at the Island Mill, Lisburn, he was the six member of the Conservative flute Band to be killed in the war. Two sisters and their husbands, Maggie and Joseph Brown and M. and W. Spence lived on the Hillhall Road, the Browns at number 14. A brother and sister-in-law, W.S. and M. Cathcart lived at 824 Crumlin Road, Belfast. On the 1 September 1917 a year to the day after his death his family included In Memoriam notices in the Herald. Cathcart, DavidNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
127CathcartRobertRm2598RIRIrishLisburnBelfastLisburnLisburnFranceCambraiKIA1917-11-23 00:00:0018Cambrai Memorial, Louverval Military Cemetery, FranceCATHCART, Rifleman Robert. Born and living in Lisburn, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 8 RIR (259). KIA in France on the 23.11.17 aged 18, his death is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval Military Cemetery, France. He was the son of Thomas Cathcart of 3 Longstone Street, Lisburn, Co. Antrim.
128ChambersJamesRm1742811RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceCHAMBERS, Rifleman James. Born and living in Lisburn where he enlisted, he served in 11 RIR (17428) and embarked with them for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Listed as missing on the 16 July 1916 and eventually, a year later in July 1917 confirmed as having been KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and Face 15A/B. He was the only surviving son of Samuel Chambers of 3 Market Street Lisburn. He, Samuel Chambers, having received no word from his son, had written to Captain Deverell the adjutant of 11 RIR asking for any news. The reply he received on the 19 July stated that there was a possibility that his son may have been taken prisoner but cautioning against holding out too much hope.
129ChambersWilliam CPvt1341111RInFIrishSalfordBelfastH'boro Drumlough?FranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceCHAMBERS, Private William C or G. Born in Salford, Manchester, he lived at Drumlough? Hillsborough, enlisted at Belfast and served in 11 RInF (13411). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 4, face D, or pier 5, face B.
130ChambersJosephRm60911RIRIrishBanbridgeBelfastDunmurryDunmurryFranceBelgian borderDOW1916-12-23 00:00:0026Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceCHAMBERS, Rifleman Joseph. Born in Banbridge, Co. Down, he lived on the Stewartstown Road, Dunmurry. Enlisting at Belfast he served in 11 RIR (609) and DoW in France, according to the CWGC on the 23.12.16 at the age of 26. However, according to Aaron Chambers, Joseph Chambers nephew, his great uncle was 19 when he was killed and underage when he enlisted with three of his mates in 1914. They, his mates, all survived and it appears that one of them brought back a lock of his great uncle’s hair and three tunic buttons which are still (July 2007) in his possession. The version of events told to the family was that he was killed by Germans firing from a position concealed by the body or hide of a cow and that he sustained multiple gunshot wounds. Also Aaron Chambers has an Army document which gives the date of death as the 21.12.16 rather than the 23rd. The son of Joseph and Mary Chambers of Stewartstown Road, Dunmurry, Co. Antrim, Joseph Chambers was buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, Nord, France, (close to the Franco-Belgium frontier) plot 3, row A, grave 157. The headstone inscription reads, “We think of you in silence no eyes may see us weep”. Chambers, JosephPat Geary/Lisburn.com
131ChapmanWilliamRm223411RIRIrishBroomhedgeLisburnMoiraLisburnFranceBelgian borderDOW1917-06-03 00:00:0026Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceCHAPMAN, Rifleman William J. Born in Broomhedge, Co. Antrim, he lived in Moira and 8 Ballynahinch Road, Lisburn. A member of the UVF, he enlisting in Lisburn and serving in 11 RIR (2234). He embarked with his battalion for France from Bordon in October 1915 and may have been wounded in June or early July 1916 and again in September 1916. He died at a CCS in France from wounds received at Messines in Belgium on the 3.6.17 aged 26, and is buried in plot 3, row B, grave 217 in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, France, (very close to the Franco-Belgian border). The headstone inscription reads, “Thy will be done. Ever remembered by his wife and child. M. Chapman, Lisburn”. He was the husband of Martha Chapman of 8 Ballynahinch Road, Lisburn whom he had married after joining up. They had a young daughter. His father John Chapman’s address was Moyrusk. His brother James Chapman who lived with their mother in Longstone Street and Cousin Joseph Chapman from Smithfield, also served. Both were wounded in June or early July 1916.
132ChapmanNicholasRm101702RIRIrishShankillBelfastDromaraSwitzerlandDied/PoW-ex1918-05-10 00:00:00Vevey (St. Martin's) Cemetery, SwitzerlandCHAPMAN  Rifleman Nicholas. Born in Shankill, Co. Antrim, he lived in Dromara, Co. Down, enlisted at Belfast and served in 2 RIR (10170). Taken prisoner but subsequently released into Swiss custody, he died in Switzerland on the 10.5.18 and is buried in grave 13 in St. Martin's Cemetery, Vevey which is on the northern shore of Lake Leman (also known as Lake Constance), close to the eastern end. In 1916 agreements were made between the Swiss Government and the French, British and German Governments under which a number of wounded PoWs were interned in Switzerland. The first British prisoners arrived there at the end of May 1916 and the average number under treatment during the remainder of the war was 2,000. Of these, 61 died before repatriation.
133ChapmanEdwardRm645912RIRIrishMegaberryLisburnWinnipegFranceSommeDied1918-05-17 00:00:0019Roye New British Cemetery, FranceCHAPMAN, Rifleman Edward. Born in Aghalee or Megaberry, Moira, he enlisted at Lisburn, Co. Antrim and served in C Company 12 RIR (6459). He died on the Somme on the 17.5.18 age 19 and is buried in Roye New British Cemetery, Somme, France, plot 2, row B, grave 17. His parents Joseph and Susan Chapman lived at 722 Mulvey Avenue, Fort Rouge, Winnipeg, Canada.
134ChapmanGeorgePvt24484121CEF WORImperialBelfastWindsor OntarioCanadaH'boro, CorcreenyFranceArrasKIA1918-08-30 00:00:0031Sun Quarry Cemetery, Cherisy, FranceCHAPMAN, Private George. Born in Belfast on the 12.6.1887, he lived in Canada and enlisted in the Canadian army at Windsor, Ontario on the 12.6.17, his thirtieth birthday. A single man, he was a labourer by trade and had no previous military experience. He was 5’8” tall, had a fair complexion, with blue eyes and brown hair. His chest measured 40” fully expanded with a 4” range of expansion. He served in 1 CI, WOR (2448412) and was KIA in France on the 30.8.18 age 31. He is buried in Sun Quarry Cemetery, Cherisy, France, row E, grave 5 and was the son of Mrs. Prudence Chapman of Corcreeny, Hillsborough, Co. Down.Chapman, GeorgeNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
135CherryJames Alexander (Jim)Sgt1403911RInFIrishLisburnEnniskillenEnniskillen/LisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-16 00:00:0025Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumCHERRY, Sergeant James Alexander (Jim). Born at Bow Street, Lisburn on the 12 January 1892 he lived in the town for a time and was a member of the Christ Church Company of the CLB. He later managed a chemists shop for a Mr. Parker in Enniskillen where he had been living for a number of years before the War although he also had a Lisburn address. A member of the local battalion of the UVF, he enlisted in Enniskillen in 11 RInF (14039) shortly after the outbreak of hostilities, embarking for France in October 1915. Seriously wounded on the Somme, on the 1st. July 1916 (by which time he held the rank of corporal), he recovered in hospital in Birmingham but was subsequently KIA in Belgium on the 16 August 1917 aged 25. According to a report of his death received by his parents from Captain Alexander Spence, the Church of Ireland chaplain, “he was struck by shrapnel and killed instantaneously while gallantly advancing in the face of intense shell and machinegun fire.” His death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium, panels 70-72. He was the only son of James and Agnes Cherry (nee Topping, from Broomhedge) of 79 Bow Street, Lisburn and Violet Vale, Dublin Road, Lisburn who had been married at Christchurch, Lisburn on 16 May 1877. Just over forty years later on the 1 September 1917 they inserted the following poem in the Herald along with their son’s death notice. “Taken aside by Jesus, With a sorrowful heart to-day; But I heard Him sigh in a desert place, And I heard my beloved say: It is I and I know the pain, It is I and I know thy loss, It is I and I know the eternal gain, It is I who endured the Cross”. At the time he joined up Jim Cherry was asked whether his parents approved of him giving up his job to enlist, to which he replied, “I don’t think my parents would desire me to be a coward”. His father who had been in business in Lisburn for over 40 years “first as a merchant taylor, subsequently … [in] drapery”, was much affected by his son’s death. He died “of a broken heart” on the 18 May 1919 having, “been in indifferent health of late, and never really put[ting] any heart into anything since the death of his only son”. James Cherry senior was interred in the family burial ground at Blaris on the 20 May. He was survived by his wife and five daughters. However, Agnes Cherry’s suffering was not over. Shortly after her husband’s death one of their daughters died. Then in late August 1920 “she and two of her daughters had to be, “bundled out of their shop and home in Bow Street, Lisburn… to prevent them from burning to death”. Agnes Cherry lived on at Violet Vale, Dublin Road, Lisburn and died on the 27 May 1935 aged 78.Cherry, JamesAlexanderNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
136CherryJosephPvt262587RIrRIrishRDF 23525HumbertstownLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1918-10-14 00:00:0019Hooge Crater Cemetery, BelgiumCHERRY, Private Joseph. Born in Humbertstown or Hannaghstown, Co. Antrim probably in 1899, before the war he had worked for George Wilson of Smithfield, Lisburn. He volunteered in September 1915 when he was in all lightlihood only 16 years old, enlisting in Lisburn and serving originally in the RDF (23525), before being transferred to 7 RIrR (26258). Slightly wounded in September 1918 he was KIA in Belgium two months later on the 14.10.18 age 19. Writing to his mother, Lieutenant Leslie Johnston informed her that he had been, “shot through the head by a sniper’s bullet, and death was absolutely instantaneous. We had just won a position during which your son behaved with great gallantry, keeping up a very heavy fire with his machine gun which was of the greatest assistance to his comrades”. Joseph Cherry is buried in Hooge Crater Cemetery, Ypres, Belgium, plot 17, row H, grave 10. He was the only son of Mrs. Agnes Cherry nee Hamill of 1 Antrim Place, Lisburn, Co. Antrim and probably of Joseph Cherry. They had been married on the 2 May 1893.
137ClarkeJosephPvt190317AEFImperialRockorry, Co. MonaghanNewcastle, NSW, AustraliaNewcastle, NSW, AustraliaRockorry, Co. MonaghanFranceBelgian BorderKIA1916-06-06 00:00:0028Brewery Orchard Cemetery, FranceCLARKE, Private Joseph. Born in Tanmecanally, Rockcorry, Co. Monaghan about 1888, he was educated at Dartrey N.S., Rockcorry. Although he had no other training, he served in the RIC in Lisburn, before emigrated to Australia, probably landing at Liverpool, N.S.W. in about 1913. Employed as a signalman on the railway, he may have lived at Abermain although in the Australian War Memorial records he was “chiefly associated with” Newcastle and the address he gave to the military authorities was, “c/o Stationmaster, Newcastle, N.S.W”. Enlisting in the Australian army on the 12.6.15, he had no previous military experience, was 6’ and ½” tall, weighed 182 lbs, had a 35½” to 39” chest, dark complexion, grey eyes and dark hair. Posted on the 1.7.15 to the 17 AI, A.I.F (1903) at Liverpool, N.S.W., he embarking from Sydney on the 9.8.15 aboard the H.M.A.T. “Runic”, arriving in Gallipoli with the second Australian contingent on the 12.10.15. Wounded in the right hand shortly before or during the early stages of the evacuation, he was admitted to hospital on Murdros on the 19.12.15. Four days later he was transferred to Alexandria on the “Dunluce Castle” arriving there two days before Christmas, and was sent to No. 1 Auxillary Hospital at Heliopolis. Discharged on the 28 December, he returned to duty at Tel-el-Keb on the 19 January 1916. Three months later on the 17.3.16, he embarked at Alexandria for France, landing at Marsailles on the 23.3.16. KIA in France on the 6.6.16 age 28, he was buried the following day by the Rev. E.C. Single of the 20th Battalion A.I.F. in Brewery Orchard Cemetery, Bois-Grenier, Nord, France, plot 4, row D, grave 1. Bois-Grenier is a village 4 kilometres south of Armentieres, and Brewery Orchard Cemetery is so called because the cellar of the brewery in the village was used as a dressing station and the cemetery was started in the orchard nearby. It was sheltered from enemy observation by ruined houses and continued to be used from November 1914 until January 1918. Joseph Clarke was the son of Hugh and Elizabeth Jane Clarke of Tanmecanally, Rockcorry, Co. Monaghan. A claim by his mother for a pension was rejected by the authorities on the grounds that she had not been dependent on her son for the fifteen months prior to his enlistment. Two of his brothers lived in Belfast, Thomas who served in the RIC and was stationed at Henry Street Barracks, and Fred who lived at 48 Nansen (Hansen?) Street. The picture of Joseph Clarke in the Australian War Memorial comes from a composite photograph presented to the Abermain RSL by the ladies of the Abermain Comforts Fund. It contains the pictures of the twenty five servicemen from Abermain who died during WW1. On the 6 March 1917 his mother replied to the Kit Store of the AIF in London acknowledging receipt of package number 7486. It contained some of his effects - a bible and 2 brushes. A separate list of items including a disc, prayer book, letters, 2 pipes, a knife, testament, 4 keys on a chain and a purse had also been issued on the 11.7.16 but it is not clear whether or not these were ever received by her.
138ClarkeAdamPvt280819RInFIrishDunmurryBelfastDunmurryDunmurryFranceSommeDOW1916-06-28 00:00:0035Forceville Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceCLARKE, Private Adam. Born in Dunmurry, he lived in Milfort Avenue, Dunmurry, enlisted at Belfast and served in 9 RInF (28081). He DoW on the Somme on the 28.6.16 age 35 and is buried in Forceville Communal Cemetery and Extension, Somme, France, plot 2, row A, grave 15 next to David Boyd, above. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of William and Annie Clarke of Dunmurry.
139ClarkeRobert JeffersonPvt62318127CEF MtbaRImperial61IrelandWinnipeg, CanadaWinnipeg, CanadaLisburnFranceArrasKIA1916-09-15 00:00:0033Vimy Memorial, FranceCLARKE Private Robert Jefferson. Born in Ireland on the 25.4.1883, he was employed on the clerical staff at William Barbours and Sons at Hilden. Living in Winnipeg when the war broke out he enlisted there on the 8.9.15 age 32 years 4 months. A clerk by profession, he had no previous military experience. His medical report states that he was 5’9” tall had a fair complexion, blue eyes and red hair. His chest measurement was 34” fully expanded with an extension of 4”. It also mentions that he had a hernia and would be accepted into the army after an operation. Posted to 61 CI (623181) he servd with 27 CI, MR (623181). Home in Lisburn for a short leave in November 1915, he went to France in April 1916, was listed as missing and subsequently, in May 1917, reported KIA there on the 15.9.16 age 33. His death is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial, France. He was the husband of Elizabeth Clarke and eldest son of Joseph and Elizabeth Clarke, all of Magheralave Road, Lisburn. He was also brother of Corporal William. J. Clarke, Sergeant Joseph (Joe) Clarke MM. and Quartermaster George Clarke. William Clarke who was in the Liverpool Scottish, was reported missing in 1917 but subsequently, on the 25.1.18, reported wounded with a bullet through the thigh, and a PoW in Germany. The news was received by his wife who lived in Liverpool. Joseph Clarke, who probably served in the RIR (17444), was awarded the M.M. in July 1917 and was convalescing in the Co. Antrim Infirmary at the time of his brother’s death. He was wounded again at Messines in June 1917 and for a third time in August 1917, on that occasion, being shot through the mouth and losing a number of teeth. Quartermaster George Clarke served 11 RIR having embarked from Bordon Camp with them in October 1915. All three of Robert Clarke’s brothers appear to have survived the war. A sister, Mabel Clarke, worked as a VAD in Hilden Hospital and the UVF hospital in Belfast. Clarke, RobertJeffersonNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
140ClarkeAlfred JamesRm1743622EBSupport11,11/13RIRLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1918-03-29 00:00:0027Pozieres Memorial, FranceCLARKE, Rifleman Alfred James. Born in Lisburn where he lived on the belsize Road, he enlisted in Lisburn and served in 11 RIR (17436), embarking with them for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Wounded in August 1917, he was treated in hospital in Oxford. Subsequently transferred to 11/13 RIR and attached to 22 entrenching battalion, he was KIA on the Somme on the 29.3.18 aged 27. His death is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, France, panels 74-76. He was the son of James and Marianne Clarke of Belsize Road, Lisburn.
141ClarkeJ WilliamSgt1941412RIRIrish11 RIR?BallinderryAntrimCrumlinBelfast/CrumlinBelgiumPoperingheDOW1918-04-12 00:00:0040Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, BelgiumCLARKE, Sergeant J. William. Born in Ballinderry, Co. Antrim, he lived in Crumlin Co. Antrim. A member of the Orange Order in Glenavy, he enlisted at Antrim, possibly in 11 RIR, and served in D Company 12 RIR (19414). He DoW in Belgium on the 12.4.18 age 40 and is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, Belgium, plot 26, row H, grave 2A. The son of Thomas and Sarah Clarke of Crumlin, his wife Catherine Graham subsequently re-married and lived at 19 Malt Street, Grosvenor Road, Belfast.
142ClayJohn (Jack)Rm663411RIRIrishLambegLisburnLambegLambegFranceSommeDOW1916-03-28 00:00:0018Forceville Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceCLAY, Rifleman John (Jack). Born and living in Lambeg, he enlisted in Lisburn at the start of the war and served in 11 RIR (6634), embarking for France from Bordon in October 1915. He DoW on the Somme on the 28.3.16 aged 18. According to the Rev. A. Gibson an Army Chaplain writing to the Rev. J.J.C. Breakey the minister of 1st Lisburn Presbyterian Church, “I was urgently called upon to visit [Jack Clay] in the field hospital where I found him seriously wounded. He was not suffering undue pain then but was in a very drowsy way. He roused himself to talk to me. … He was very weak, but I was glad to be with him. He told me that he came from Lambeg and that you were his minister. I did not worry him with many questions. I talked to him and had prayer with him. He died very soon afterwards. … he seemed a very nice lad”. The Rev. Gibson conducted Jack Clay’s burial service, “in a little cemetery some five miles or so behind the lines. I have arranged,” he added, “that his grave be marked with his name etc. upon it”. Jack Clay was buried in Forceville Communal Cemetery Extension, France, plot 1, row A, grave 6. The Rev. Gibson appears to have been true to his word. There is no inscription on the existing headstone but according to the CWGC register, there was one on the original wooden cross. “Soldier rest, thy warfare o'er, sleep the sleep that knows no breaking, dream of fighting fields no more, day of toil and night of waiting.” He was the son of Mary Clay and the late Thomas Clay of the Post Office, Lambeg, Lisburn, and brother of Thomas Clay, below.

Mrs. Clay also received letters of condolence from two of her son’s officers. Captain Arthur Charley wrote, “Your son was always a smart, quiet hard working fellow … and his loss will be greatly felt, both from a military standpoint and also as a friend, as I know he was greatly liked by the other men in his platoon and company”. Using similar language, Lieutenant F.R. Webb described him as, “one of those quiet, descent, willing young chaps who can be ill spared at the present time and we all feel his loss deeply. I am sure though that you will find consolation in the fact that he died doing his duty”. She appears as well to have been involved with the Hilden-Lambeg Work Society which provided comforts for soldiers. The secretary had a notice included in the Standard on the 25.8.16 saying how difficult it was to keep track of men who were sick and wounded and asked relatives to forward addresses to Mrs. Clay at Lambeg Post Office. She may also have had a daughter who helped in the work. A Miss Clay of Lambeg is mentioned in the News Letter on the 4.7.16 as a contributor to comforts sent out to soldiers in 11 RIR in the first half of 1916.
Clay, JohnNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
143ClayThomasQMS112379RInFIrishLambegOmaghLambegLambegBelgiumYpresKIA1918-09-29 00:00:0027Birr Cross Roads Cemetery, Zillbeck, BelgiumCLAY, QMS Thomas. Born in Lambeg, Co. Antrim, he lived in Lambeg or Lisburn. A member of the Tyrone UVF, he enlisted at Omagh and served in the TMB in 9 RInF (11237). KIA in Belgium on the 29.9.18 aged 27, he is buried in Birr Cross Roads Cemetery, Zillebeke, Belgium, plot 3, row D, grave 1. The headstone inscription reads, “Until the day breaketh and the shadows flee away”. He was the son of Mary Clay of the Post Office, Lambeg, Lisburn, and the late Thomas Clay, and brother of John Clay, above. Captain C. W. Milne, writing to Mrs. Clay told her that “death was instantaneous” and that her son had not suffered any pain. He went on, “Your son has been a very good soldier and a great favourite with everybody, and all his chums wish me to convey to you an expression of their sincere sympathy. It will be of some comfort to you that he made the supreme sacrifice in the service of his country”. Mary Clay appears as well to have been involved with the Hilden-Lambeg Work Society which provided comforts for soldiers. The secretary had a notice included in the Standard on the 25.8.16 saying how difficult it was to keep track of men who were sick and wounded and asked relatives to forward addresses to her at Lambeg Post Office. She may also have had a baughter who helped in the work. A Miss Clay of Lambeg is mentioned in the News Letter on the 4.7.16 as a contributor to comforts sent out to soldiers in 11 RIR in the first half of 1916. Clay, ThomasNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
144ClelandRichardPvt7401IGIrishMoiraBelfastBelfastBelgiumYpresKIA1914-11-01 00:00:0037Oxford Road Cemetery, Ypres, BelgiumCLELAND, Private Richard. Born in Moira, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 IG (740). KIA in Belgium on the 1.11.14 age 37, he is buried in Oxford Road Cemetery, Ypres, Belgium, plot 2, row F, grave 3. He was the son of Richard Cleland of Belfast and husband of Eliza Cleland of 115 Riga Street, Belfast.
145ClelandGeorgeRm1736511RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0034Thiepval Memorial, FranceCLELAND, Rifleman George. Born in and enlisted at Lisburn, Co. Antrim before the war he was employed in Robert Stewart and Sons mill. An Orangeman and member of the Lisburn battalion of the UVF, he also played football for Roseville F.C. Serving in A Company 11 RIR (17365), he embarked for France from Bordon Camp with 11 RIR in October 1915. and was KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 34. His death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A/B. He was the husband of Letitia Cleland of 43 Church Street, Lisburn, Co. Antrim and they had three young children. His brother was William Cleland, manager of the firm of Henry Major, wholesale spirit merchants of Market Square, Lisburn.
146ClementsWilliam Hunter2Lt11RInFIrishRDFBelfast/AnnahiltBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-16 00:00:0024New Irish Farm Cemetery, St. Jean-les-Ypres, BelgiumCLEMENTS, Second Lieutenant William Hunter. Educated at the Lisburn Intermediate School, he was employed in the Ulster Bank when the war broke out. He enlisted in the RDF and took part in the landing at Sulva Bay and the fighting at Chocolate Hill in Gallipoli. He was subsequently posted to Salonica before being recommended for a commission and sent home for training. Commissioned into the 11 RInF he was KIA on the 16.8.17 age 24. Buried in New Irish Farm Cemetery, Ypres, Belgium, plot 25, row F, grave 16. He was the son of Andrew Clements, LL.D., and Margaret B. Clements of 28 Knutsford Drive, Cliftonville, Belfast and formerly of Annahilt, Lisburn, and nephew of James Hunter C.E. of Antrim Road, Lisburn. Clements, WilliamHunterILC&LM
147ClendinningRobert AlexanderCpl188903RIRIrishGlenaveyHomeDundrodDied1920-11-11 00:00:0045Dundrod Presbyterian Churchyard, Co. AntrimCLENDINNING, Corporal Robert Alexander. Served in 3 RIR (18890). He died on the 11.11.20 age 45 and is buried in Dundrod Presbyterian Graveyard, grave 231. He was the husband of Agnes Clendinning, Riverside, Glenavy, Lisburn who died on the 7.2.71 aged 99. His son David Clendinning was killed during WW2 on the 5.7.40 aged 30 while serving on HMS Whirlpool.
148ClibbornJohn BarkleyLt3CEF CMRImperial19 Alberta DragoonsYorkshireMedicine Hat, AlbertaStrathcona, AlbertaBelgiumPloegsteertDOW1915-11-27 00:00:0028Maple Leaf Cemetery, Romarin, Neuve-Eglise, BelgiumCLIBBORN, Lieutenant John Barclay. Born in Bentham, Yorkshire on 24.1.1887, he was an old scholar of Friends’ School, Lisburn. A married man and broker by occupation he enlisted in the Canadian army at Medicine Hat, Alberta on the 25.5.15 age 28 years and 2 months. He was 5’7” tall with a ruddy complexion, brown hair and brown eyes. His chest was 37” fully expanded with a 3” expansion. Before joining up he had been attached to the L[ight] Strathcona Horse for a course of instruction and held a commission in the 19th. Alberta Dragoons. Overseas he was to serve in the 3rd. Batt., 1OR CMR.

By the beginning of September they were training at Shorncliffe on the outskirts of Folkstone being inspected by the King on the 2nd of the month. Then on the 19th orders were received to move the following day. On the morning of Monday 20th preparations were made for sending the transport and baggage forward and the first two parties totalling about 130 men left the camp in the evening to embark at Southampton. The remaining 25 officers and 551 other ranks expected to follow the next day, but no orders were received so the time was spent cleaning up the camp, on parades and, more ominously, depositing wills with the quartermaster. Orders to depart did come on the 22nd and at 5.20 p.m. 447 men left Shorncliffe for Folkstone harbour; which had become the main embarkation point for soldiers leaving to fight in the trenches of France and Belgium. (Over the course of the war hundreds of thousands of soldiers, including many Canadian troops, left from Folkestone, marching from the Town to the Harbour along the route now called the "Road of Remembrance"). By 9 o’clock that evening they were in Boulogne.

After an overnight stop at camps in the town 3CMR entrained at 5.30 p.m. the following afternoon arriving in Bailleul in Belgium just before midnight. The men were marched to the Grand Place and then billeted in the town. Next day, the 24th., temporary Regimental Offices were opened at 2 Rue du Musee before being shifted down the street to number 11 on the 25th. That day a group of 4 officers and 125 NCOs and men left for “frontier post duty” and the first group to leave Shorncliffe on the 20th. arrived in Bailleul. They were joined on the 26th. by the second advanced party as well as “all regimental horses and transport”. Clearly the idea of a more mobile form of warfare was still in someone’s mind. The next day the battalion moved on once again and by the 28th were at Kortepyp Huts about 1¾ km south west of Neuve Eglise. They were about to go into the front line.

On each of the next four days (29 September to the 2 October) parties of about 60 men were sent up to the trenches for the first time, each returning the following day; one man was reported missing on the 30 September and two were wounded on the 1 October. Meanwhile, the remainder of the unit were involved in “clean[ing] up of camp; horse lines [were] shifted, latrines cleaned, additional holes dug and old tin cans, refuse, garbage etc. buried”.

By the 3 October, the battalion was on the move again, this time a little further north firstly to Mount Kemmel and then on the 4th to dugouts at Ridgewood 1½ miles east of Dickebusch and near to La Brasserie. There they formed part of a mobile reserve under General Seeley. The succeeding days were relatively quiet with pairs of officers taking it in turn to occupy an observation post. On the 8th it was the turn of Lieutenants Clibborn and Davies who “returned at 11.30 a.m. on account of haze”. The following day the regiment were relieved by 19CEF and made their way to Aldershot Huts close to Kortepyp by way of Dickebusch, La Clytte, Locre and Dranoutre. The 11 October was spent “cleaning up [the] camp and billets. Ditches and drains [were] opened up and freed from refuse”. A report from Brigade HQ on the 12 October noted that “no cameras or Kodaks [were] in [the] possession of any officer, NCO or man in [the] regiment”. However, an inspection by General Alderson resulted in some criticism as some men were unshaved, the absence of entrenching tools and the state of saddelry and harness and of the transport horses. On top of that the following morning (the 14 October) at parade it was found that 108080 Pte. Barber was missing.

After a general clean up of the camp, the regiment was then sent back to billets near Bailleul with HQ being established at St. Eloi estaminet on the edge of the town on the road leading towards Armentieres. For the remainder of the month and well into November, the regiment were continually involved in the provision of working parties with 108648 Harvey Russel Young being the units next casualty when he was wounded on the 30 October. As for the absent Gilbert Barber, he “reported back from missing” on the 19th.

Five days later on the 24 November 3CMR made the 2½ hour march to Bulford south west of Neuve Eglise roughly mid way between Aldershot and Kortepyp Huts close to where they had been before, and spent the next day tidying the camp up. The following day, the 26 November, two officers Clibborn and Davies and 4 NCOs moved out to take over trenches 134 and 135. At 4.30 p.m. a telephone message was received that Lt. Clibborn had been killed. “The party”, the battalion War Diary records, “came under HE shell fire near Court Dreve. Lt. Clibborn was struck in the head by a piece of shell and died without regaining consciousness”. The same shell struck 108400 (Alexander Morrison) who was cleared to Romarin by No. 3 Field Ambulance”. John Clibborn may have made the same journey shortly before he died; the record of admissions to 3 Canadian Field Ambulance shows that the unit treated one wounded Canadian officer that day. In any event he was buried in Maple Leaf Cemetery, Romarin, Neuve-Eglise, Belgium, row A, grave 6. He was 28 years old. His headstone inscription reads, “St. John 15-13 Greater love hath no man than this that a man lay down his life for his friends”.

John Clibborn was the husband of Catherine L. Clibborn of 11407 100th. Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, son of Alfred E. and Mrs. Clibborn of Crawford Bay, British Columbia, formerly of Ury, Clara, Kings County and nephew of Miss Clibborn of 14 Carlisle Avenue, Donnybrook.
Clibborn, JohnBarkleyPat Geary/Our Heroes
149CloseWilliamPvt145069RInFIrishShankillFinner campLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-05-08 00:00:00Authuile Military Cemetery, FranceCLOSE, Private William. Born in Shankill, Co. Antrim, he lived in Lisburn. A member of the UVF before the war, he enlisted at Finner Camp, Co. Donegal and served in 9 RInF (14506). KIA on the Somme on the 8.5.16 he is buries in Authuile Military Cemetery, France, row D, grave 41. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of Jemima Close of Ballymacash, Lisburn.Close, WilliamNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
150CoatesWilliamLcpl91761RIRIrishLisburnBelfastBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1915-05-09 00:00:00Ploegsteert Memorial, BelgiumCOATES, Lance corporal William. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RIR (9176). KIA in Belgium on the 9.5.15, his death is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium.
151CoburnRobertRm39042RIRIrishH'boroBallykinlarBelfastBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1916-01-19 00:00:00Tancrez Farm Cemetery, BelgiumCOBURN, Rifleman Robert. Born in Hillsborough, Co. Down, he lived in Beflast, enlisted at Ballykinlar, Co. Down and served in 2 RIR (3904). KIA in Belgium on the 19.1.16, he is buried in Tancrez Farm Cemetery, Belgium, plot 1, row G, grave 2. There is no headstone inscription.
152CoburnJamesRm216712RIRIrish11 RIRLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumOther/NamurDied/PoW/pneumonia1918-10-14 00:00:0018Belgrade Cemetery, Namur, BelgiumCOBURN, Rifleman James. Born in Lisburn, he lived at 3 Wilson Street on the Low Road in the town where he and his two brothers John and David were members of Lisburn Temperence Silver band. He enlisted at Lisburn along with his brother John when, according to the Standard he was “still not 17” years old. Posted to A Co. 11 RIR , they embarked with their battalion for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Wounded on the Somme on the 1.7.16, again in September 1916 (probably in the gas attack in which 11 RIR were involved on the 1.9.16) and for a third time in June 1917, he transferred to 12 RIR 2167 when 11 RIR were disbanded in late 1917. Captured around the 27 March 1918 on the sixth day of the German offensive, he seems to have been held for a time at Limberg in Germany. Another prisoner there at the time was Herbert McComiskey before the war, an employee of Beechpark Dairy, who had also served as a Rifleman in 11 RIR. Posted missing in March 1918 he (McComiskey) sent a letter to his parents who lived in Market Square, saying that he had been taken prisoner on the 27 March and, “I am getting along all right so far. I cannot complain, and we are getting plenty to eat. There is a young chap called Coburn of the Low Road, with me. He is the only one I know here”. Coburn too wrote home and the letter, received by his mother on the 9 May 1918, letting her know that he was all right, “expressed the hope that his brother John had come through safely”. He had. Five months later, however, on the 14.10.18, James Coburn still a PoW but now at War Hospital 10, Namur, died from pneumonia. He was 18 years old. Buried in Belgrade Cemetery, Namur, Belgium, plot 4, row C, grave 11, he was the son of David and Emma Coburn of 3 Wilson Street, Lisburn. James Coburn’s other brother, David who also served as a Rifleman, and Herbert McComiskey both appear to have survived the War. Why James Coburn died in Namur when he was in prison in Limberg shortly after his capture is not clear. Nor too is his age. If the CWGC records are correct and he was 18 when he died in 1918 then he could have been as young as 14 when he enlisted. His death as a PoW is recorded on the family headstone in Lisburn Cemetery. David Coburn Snr. died in 1928 and Emma Coburn in 1947.
153CochraneGeorgePvt256112RIRIrish11 RIRBallyaghlis, LisburnLisburnBallyaghlis, LisburnBallyaghlis, LisburnFranceCambraiKIA1917-11-22 00:00:00Cambrai Memorial, Louverval Military Cemetery, FranceCOCHRANE, Rifleman George. Born and living in Ballyaughlis, Co. Down, he enlisted at Lisburn, and served in 11 RIR, embarking with them from Bordon Camp for France in October 1915. Subsequently transferred to 12 RIR (2561) when 11 RIR were disbanded, he was reported missing and subsequently, in August/September 1918, KIA in France on the 22.11.17. His death is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, Nord, France, panel 10. He was the eldest son of Agnes Cochrane of Ballyaughlis, Lisburn. His step father was also on active service.
154ColdwellChristopher JohnGds62781IGIrishDublin (London?)Biscathorpe, LincolnBiscathorpe, LincolnFranceLensKIA1915-10-12 00:00:0026Loos British Cemetery, FranceCOLDWELL, Guardsman Christopher John. He had an address in Biscathorpe, Lincoln, but was a police constable in the RIC in Lisburn. He and four other constables (George Bell, William Cunningham, P. Shields and William Stewart) left Lisburn on the 29 December 1914 to enlist in the Irish Guards. “Large crowds” assembled to see them off, and each was presented with a box of cigarettes before they left. Marching from Smithfield barracks, they were escorted by a guard of honour made up of men from 11 RIR. According to the Standard, “the constables went direct to London” although the WOCL records that Coldwell enlisted in Dublin. Serving in 1 IG (6278), he was KIA in France on the 12.10.15 age 26, and is buried in Loos British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France, plot 15, row A, grave 13. He was the son of the late Rev. and Mrs. G. H. H. Coldwell of Biscathorpe Rectory, near Louth, Lincs. Of the five constables who left Lisburn that afternoon late in December 1914, at least three, Bell (above), Coldwell and Cunningham (below), were to die before the war was over. Shields appears to have survived, and Stewart may have done so as well, although his fate is less certain. A Guardsman William Stewart who was born in Hamilton Lanark, enlisted in West Calder, Midlothian and served in 2 IG (7365), DoW in France on the 15.11.15 aged 27. Buried in Longuenesse (St. Omer) Souvenir Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France, plot, 3, row A, grave 12, he was the husband of Janet Stewart of 22 Blantyre Terrace, Edinburgh.
155CollinsDavid McCPvt2657566BWScottishBelfastPerthAndersontownFranceArrasKIA1917-05-17 00:00:0020Bailleul Road East Cemetery, St. Laurent-Blangy, FranceCOLLINS, Private David McC. Born in Belfast, he enlisted at Perth and served in 6 BW (Perthshire Territorial Battalion) (265756). KIA in France on the 17.5.17 age 20, he is buried just north east of Arras in Bailleul Road East Cemetery, St. Laurent-Blangy, Pas de Calais, France, plot 2, row F, grave 35. He was the son of Mr. R. and Mrs. J.A. Collins of "Maryburn", Andersontown, Belfast.
156ConlonBenjaminPvt40561058CEF CORImperialCo. TyroneNiagraLisburnFranceArrasKIA1916-09-22 00:00:0027Vimy Memorial, FranceCONLON, Private Benjamin. Born in Co. Tyrone on the 22.11.1888 he emigrated to Canada, “a few” years before the war. A single man and stable groom by trade, he was in the 48th. Highlanders (Malitia) but had not seen any military service. He enlisted at Niagara on the 15.6.15 aged 26½. He was 5’ 8½“ tall with a 36” chest and 4” expansion. Of “medium” complexion, he had blue eyes and dark brown hair. He served in the 58 CI CoR CEF (405610) and was KIA in France between the 19 and 22.9.16 aged 27. He was the brother of Mary Conlon and Mrs. George Wilson of 11 Smithfield, Lisburn and youngest son of the late John Conlon of Ennish, Castlecaufield, Co. Tyrone. In a letter to his sister in Lisburn, Lieutenant King Eager wrote, “Console yourself with the thought that your brother gave his life for King and Country, and will receive his reward in another and better world”. Writing on the 27 September, Captain and Chaplain C.K. Masters said, “Your brother was killed while our battalion was taking part in the great advance. … He was buried on the field of battle, and we were able to give him a Christian burial. I hope it may be some comfort to you to know that in making the supreme sacrifice he proved himself a brave soldier and a true man”. Benjamin Conlon’s grave was subsequently lost and his death is now commemorated on the Vimy memorial, France.
157ConnorGeorge ParkinsonRm17/8378RIRIrishAntrimBelfastBrookfield MoiraFranceSommeKIA1916-01-08 00:00:0023Auchonvilles Military Cemetery, FranceCONNOR, Rifleman George Parkinson. Born in Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 8 RIR (17/837). KIA in France on the 8.1.16 aged 23, he is buried at Auchonvillers Military Cemetery, France, plot 2, row A, grave 29. The headstone inscription gives his parents details. “Son of Joseph and Eleanor Connor of Brookfield, Moira, Co. Down, N. Ireland.” They were both teachers at Brookfield National School. Three other brothers also served. John the eldest, who had been in Malta, Crete and Tientsien in Northern China had by October 1915 been at the front for a year with 2 RInF. He was wounded in August 1917 and possibly again in September or October that year. Samuel and Joseph were both with the YCVs (14 RIR). Joseph too was wounded in the Autumn of 1917. He and John both lived at Brookfield. All three brothers appear to have survived the war.Connor, GeorgeParkinsonNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
158CookeFrederick St. GeorgePvt416949RIrFIrish2182 NIHCo.LeitrimBelfastLisburnLisburn/BelfastBelgiumYpresKIA1918-04-19 00:00:00Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumCOOKE, Private Frederick St. George. Born in Carrigallen, Co. Leitrim, he lived at Bachelor’s Walk in Lisburn. A Mason and member of the UVF in Whitehead, he enlisted at Belfast and served in the Dragoons of the Line, NIH (2182) before transferring to 9 RIrF (41694). KIA in Belgium on the 19.4.18, his death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium, panel 140-1. He was the eldest son of the late Mr. Francis Cooke of Gortmore House, Corrigallen, Co. Leitrim and husband of Jeannie C Cooke of 18 Bachelors Walk, Lisburn and subsequently of "Norton", 6 Hawthorden Road, Knock, Belfast.
159CopeGeorgeRm43816RIRIrishLisburnLurganBelfastBelfastBelgiumYpresKIA1917-01-31 00:00:0019Vlamertinghe Military Cemetery, Ypres, BelgiumCOPE, Rifleman George. Born at Lisburn, he lived in Belfast, enlisted at Lurgan and served in 16 RIR (438). KIA in Belgium on the 31.1.17 aged 19, he is buried in Vlamertinghe Military Cemetery, Belgium, plot 5, row F, grave 7. The headstone inscription reads, "Oh for the touch of a vanished hand and the sound of a voice that is still." He was the son of James and Mary Elizabeth Cope of 60 Skipton Street, Belfast.
160CordnerGeorgeRm1747811RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnHomeLisburnDied/accident1917-02-16 00:00:0037Lisburn CemeteryCORDNER, Rifleman George. Born in Lisburn where he lived at Gregg Street, he enlisting in the town and served in 11 RIR (17478) with whom he embarked for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Wounded in September 1916, he recovered and came home on ten days leave in February 1917. This ended on the 15th when he left his mother’s house at 19 Gregg Street, Lisburn to catch the Fleetwood steamer at Belfast. Accompanied by his brother James, they stopping off for a drink in a pub opposite the GNR station in Belfast before making their way to the boat where George Cordner left off his kit. Coming ashore again, the brothers then went to a pub in Queens Square to have another drink. At about 8.15 in the evening they were on their way back to the ferry with some friends when “they saw a motor lorry on Donegall Quay proceeding towards them at a slow rate. They all got safely over [except George] … who was a little behind the rest and was knocked down … the wheel of [the lorry] pass[ing] over his body”. According to the evidence given by the driver at the inquest, George Cordner appeared to have “staggered backwards” as he passed in front of the lorry and, “the left mudguard struck him, knocking him down”. Taken to a military hospital in Belfast he appears to have been conscious and was able to tell Dr. Howard Stevenson who examined him that, “he had been run over by a motor”. Stevenson described him as being “in a state of collapse … cold and practically pulseless”. As well as having a scalp wound he had a ragged wound on his left side that had probably been caused by a broken bottle which “was found in deceased’s possession”. George Cordner died at 2 a.m. the following morning, Thursday the 16.2.17, he was 37 years old. The jury at the inquest which was held at Victoria Barracks, Belfast on the 20 February, recorded a verdict of accidental death due to “shock, following haemorrhage”. He was buried with full military honours at Lisburn Cemetery, on Sunday the 18 February in Old Section, row C, grave 220. There is no headstone inscription. The funeral, according to the Standard, was “the largest (with one exception) we ever saw in Lisburn”. He was the son of George and Annie Cordner of 19 Gregg Street, Lisburn. Two of his brothers also saw active service.
161CordnerJamesLt2RIRIrish17RIRDrumboPortadownBelgiumYpresKIA1918-04-16 00:00:00Minty Farm Cemetery, St.Jean-Les-Ypres, BelgiumCORDNER, Lieutenant James. M.C. He had an address at Drumbo Manse where his brother was the Presbyterian minister and had spent some time in Canada before returning to Ireland to complete his training for the ministry. Although still in the final year of his studies, he acted for a time as assistant minister in St. Enoch’s Presbyterian Church, Belfast and became a minister in the United Free Church in Lisburn. “Volunteer[ing] for combat service” he receiving his commission through QUB OCT on the 7 June 1915 and was presented with a sword of honour by his congregation. For a time at the end of 1915 and start of 1916, he did recruiting work while attached to 17 RIR (a reserve battalion), but left Ballykinlar for the front on the 9 February 1916. Reported wounded in May 1916 following an incident in which “his shoulder straps were blown off and his uniform holed in six places by shell fragments, but beyond receiving bruises he was not otherwise injured”.

After recovering in a base hospital, he seems to have returned home for a period and on the 23 July 1916 preached at a service in Whitehead where he expressed the opinion that, “Ulster had done well but it could do better. There were still young men at home to whom the war had not yet appealed. They were still more concerned about the cut of their coats or colour of their ties, and they seemed to care little that the thunder of the guns was comparatively near their doors.”

Returning to the front, he was promoted to Lieutenant on the 1.7.17 and was wounded that summer “in the fighting [possibly Messines in early June or Langemarck in mid-August] … in which the Ulster Division took so prominent a part”. Writing after his experiences at Messines he commented that, “It is just here that the war gives an opportunity to a man with a spiritual message to come to his own. … If anyone has a right to complain against the abuses and insincerities of public life, it is the men who are out here bearing the brunt of conditions which are largely the result of faults and failings not of their own; yet instead of regarding grumbling as their prime duty, they stiffen their backs for every burden, facing the unknown with a smile and greeting the unseen with a cheer”.

Possibly transferred to the Tank Corps on the 28 December 1917, he was awarded the Military Cross for gallantry in the Battle of Cambrai. He came home on leave at the beginning of March 1918, addressing the congregation of the United Free Church, Lisburn on the 3rd and the following Thursday, the 7 March, was presented with his M.C. by the King at Buckingham Palace. Returning to the front shortly after, he was KIA in Belgium on the 16.4.18 James Cordner is buried in Minty Farm Cemetery, Belgium, plot 2, row C, grave 2. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of James Cordner of Bannside, Portadown, and brother of Joseph Cordner, minister of Drumbo Presbyterian Church between 1911 and 1926 and thereafter in Canada and Clifton Street, Belfast. There is an address to him in Drumbo Presbyterian Church, and he and his wife are buried in the church graveyard. He died on the 27.5.39 and his wife on the 31.1.77 aged 100. Another brother, Cassels Cordner was also a minister and in May 1916 was doing “temporary duty” for the Rev. McNutt at Hillhall. One of the Revs. Cordner officiated at the marriage of Campbell McCormack (below) in September 1917.
Cordner, JamesNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
162CordnerSamuelRm11RIRIrishCordner, Rifleman Samuel. Served in 11 RIR and may have embarked with them from Bordon Camp for France in October 1915. He is commemorated on Christ Church War Memorial but there is no positive trace so far.
163CorkenRobert JohnCpl17674MGC(I)Support11 RIR 17479LisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0024Thiepval Memorial, FranceCORKEN, Corporal Robert John (Bob). Born in Lisburn he lived at 73 Antrim Road in the town. A book-keeper employed with Msrs. Abraham Neil, Castalia Mills, Belfast, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in the RIR (17479), embarking for France from Bordon Camp with 11 RIR in October 1915. Transferred to 108 Company MGC (17674), he was Severely wounded on the evening of the 1 July 1916 and set off alone to get back to a dressing station. He was not to be heard from again. Posted as wounded and missing he was eventually, a year later in July 1917, listed as having been KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 24, or as the Herald put it, “it is now officially assumed that he has crossed over the space between the Two Great Silences”. His death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, Pier and face 5C or 12C. He was the son of James and Jane Corken of Antrim Road, Lisburn and a great-uncle of a Miss McCleland of 56 Antrim Road, Lisburn.
164CorkenPhilip GeorgePvt80587MTCRASCSupportLisburn/CanadaFranceRearDied1919-03-03 00:00:0019Les Baraques Military Cemetery, Sangatte, FranceCORKEN, Private Philip George. He may have enlisted when he was underage, and served in Reserve Vehicle Park (N), Mechanical Transport Corps, RASC, (M2/080587). He died in hospital in Calais on the 3.3.19 aged 19 and is buried in Les Baraques Military Cemetery, France, plot 8, row G, grave 15. (According to Martin Middlebrooke, “Guide to the Somme”, p.'s 29-30, many German prisoners died from influenza here in 1919). He was the eldest son of Philip and Ella Corken of “The Square”, Lisburn and later Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. His youngest brother Tom S. Corken was to become an Irish rugby International. He may also have been a cousin of Jack Sinclair, below. Corken, PhilipGeorgeNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
165CorkinHenry (Harry)Lsgt1748011RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeDied/drowned1916-05-17 00:00:0023Authuile Military Cemetery, FranceCORKIN, Lance Sergeant Henry (Harry). Born in Lisburn, he was “a musician of rare promise” who played the soprano cornet in the Lisburn Temperance Silver Band in which Francis Neagle (below) also played. A carpenter by trade he also belonged to the UVF. He had completed his apprenticeship with James Shortt just before he joined up, enlisting at Lisburn and serving in 11 RIR (17480) along with his two brothers Rifleman John and Lance Corporal William (Willie) Corkin, the latter being in the same platoon. They all embarked for France from Bordon Camp with their battalion in October 1915. He was drowned while bathing, probably in the River Ancre a tributary of the Somme, on the 17.5.16 aged 23.

According to Captain E.F. Smyth who wrote to his parents, he had been in command of a guard detail on a bridge and had gone in for a swim after dinner along with Riflemen J. Hillis and W. Wright, neither of whom could swim. “He told them he was going out to see how deep the pool was and then swam out about 15 yards. It would seem as if he got caught up in the weeds, and Wright tried to get him out but failed while Hillis ran for help. He had some distance to come; we ran down and Rifleman A. Larmour and Corporal Dunlop went in and swam around. Larmour found him in about ten feet of water and they brought him in. Everything possible was done by the medical officer, but he had been under too long”. He was buried with many of his friends in attendance in Authuile Military Cemetery, France, row C, grave 12. He was the son of Elizabeth and Henry Corkin of 83 Gregg Street, Lisburn and brother of Rifleman John Corkin (below). The headstone inscription reads, “Ever remembered by Father and Mother” - the same inscription used for his brother John and which appeared in an In Memoriam notice in the Herald on the 17 May 1919.

Of those involved at the time of Henry Corkin’s death only one, Wright, seems to have survived the war. All the others, Edmund Smyth, John Hillis, Alex Larmour and Quinton Dunlop appear elsewhere on this casualty list. Of his two brothers, John was to die the following February shortly after being discharged, William was wounded on the 1.7.16 and was fortunate to survive. On the opening day of the Somme he had been shot through the chest. Taken back to an overcrowded CCS, like countless others he was left outside on a stretcher awaiting treatment. He was found there by Charlie M’Cahey another Lisburn man who was a Driver with the 36 Division RASC. M’Cahey had volunteered to go down and help at the CCS after going off duty. Seeing that Corkin was bleeding heavily, he carried him to the operating table where he was treated and shipped back to the military hospital in Hampstead. On hearing the news, Henry Corkin senior, William’s father, who was employed at the Island Spinning Mill, wrote to the Standard so that, “the people of Lisburn know that Mr. M’Cahey’s action saved my boy Willie’s life”.
166CorkinJohnRm1748111RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnHomeLisburnDied/diabetes1917-02-06 00:00:0022Lisburn CemeteryCORKIN, Rifleman John. Born in Lisburn in about May 1895 he was a tailor by trade having served a four year apprenticeship - “time expired” and lived at 83 Gregg Street in the town. A single man with no previous military experience, he enlisted in Lisburn on the 12 September 1914 aged 19 years and 4 months possibly, as all three have consecutive service numbers, along with his brothers Henry and William (Willie). 5’ 9¼” tall, he weighed 126lbs had a 34” chest fully expanded with 4” range of expansion, fresh complexion, dark grey eyes and black hair. Posted to A Company 11 RIR (17481) with Henry and Willie, they all embarked from Bordon Camp for France in October 1915.

John and Willie Corkin were both wounded on the Somme on the 1 July 1916. On the 17th their father wrote to the Infantry Record Office, “Please say what you know of their conditions …”. Both had survived although for Willie it had been a close run thing (see below). John may have been posted back to duty on the 22 August but his health was deteriorating although this was probably not to do with events on the the 1 July. On the 18 September 1916 he came before a Medical Board in London and was found to be unfit for war service as a result of having developed diabetes. This according to the Board was “due to active service” and would “totally” reduce his “earning capacity”. As a result he was discharged at Dublin on the 2.10.16 with a very good character and 2 years and 21 days service. With no effective treatment available for diabetes at that time he died at his parents’ house in Gregg Street on the 6 February 1917 “of disease contracted on foreign service after being wounded”. He was 22 years old and was buried with military honours in Lisburn Cemetery two days later. His grave is in the old section, row B, number 473. The headstone inscription reads, “Ever remembered by Father and Mother” - the same inscription used for his brother Henry and which appeared in an In Memoriam notice in the Herald on the 17 May 1919. He was the third son of Henry and Elizabeth Corkin of 83 Gregg Street, Lisburn and brother of Henry Corkin, above.

A year after his death and again in 1920, John Corkin’s passing was remembered in the Lisburn Standard by his parents, sister and brothers one of whom, probably William, was back on active service. He had been fortunate to survive the opening day of the Somme on 1 July 1916. Shot through the chest he had been taken back to an overcrowded CCS, where, like countless others he was left outside on a stretcher to await treatment. Fortunately he was found there by Charlie M’Cahey another Lisburn man who was a Driver with the 36 Division RASC. M’Cahey had volunteered to go down and help at the CCS after going off duty and seeing that Corkin was bleeding heavily, had carried him to the operating table where he was treated and shipped back to the military hospital in Hampstead. On hearing the news, Henry Corkin senior, Willie’s father and an employee at the Island Spinning Mill, wrote to the Standard so that, “the people of Lisburn know that Mr. M’Cahey’s action saved my boy Willie’s life”. Willie Corkin appears to have been at home convalescing at the time of John’s death and to have attended his funeral.

Willie recovered and by March 1917 had risen to the rank of Corporal. However, this was not a rank he was to retain. On the 4 May 18 he went on leave and was due to return to No. 10 Camp at Durrington by midnight on the 8th. Unfortunately he didn’t report until about 9.30 p.m. the following evening and was charged with being “absent … when under orders for overseas”. Following a court martialled he was convicted for “absence” and sentenced to six months hard labour. This was remitted by the GoC and instead he was reduced to the rank of Rifleman. Despite his brush with death and the authorities, Willie Corkin appears to have survived the war.
167CorriganEdwardRm57541RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-16 00:00:0032Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumCORRIGAN, Rifleman Edward. Born at Blaris, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 1 RIR (5754). KIA in Belgium on the 16.8.17 aged 32, his death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium, panels 138-140. He was the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Corrigan of 6 Grove Street, Low Road, Lisburn and husband of Mrs. Catherine Corrigan of 8 and/or 24 Grand Street, Low Road, Lisburn. His brother Joseph Corrigan was also on active service. He appears to have survived the war.
168CorriganThomas PatrickPvt69656RMFIrishLR 1531BelfastLisburn/BelfastLisburn/BelfastMiddle EastPalestineKIA1917-12-28 00:00:0020Jerusalem War Cemetery, PalestineCorrigan, ThomasPatrickNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
169CorryJohnRm1737212RIRIrish2 RIR. 11 RIR?HollywoodLisburnLisburnLisburn/BelfastBelgiumYpresKIA1918-04-12 00:00:0045Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumCORRY, Rifleman John. Born in Hollywood, he had served in the 2nd. battalion RIR for 9 years and saw active service in the Boer War. He lived at Ballymullen, Lisburn and enlisting in the town, possible in 11 RIR, with whom he may have embarked for France from Bordon in October 1915. KIA in Belgium on the 12.4.18 aged 45 while serving with 12 RIR (17372), his death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium, panels 138-140. He was the son of Henry Corry and husband of Jane Corry of ballymullen, Lisburn and 151 Dunluce Avenue, Lisburn Road, Belfast.
170CostelloRobertRm57172RIRIrishLambegLisburnLisburnHomeLisburnDOW1918-01-14 00:00:00Trinity Terrace Cemetery, LisburnCOSTELLO, Rifleman Robert, MM. Born in Lambeg, he lived and enlisted in Lisburn. Serving in 2 RIR (5717), he wrote to a Mrs. Harry Dornan of Bridge Street, Lisburn in March 1915 to thank her for comforts that she had sent. He was reported wounded in November or early December 1916. Awarded the M.M. in 1917, he DoW at home on the 14.1.18 and is buried in Trinity Terrace Graveyard, Lisburn.
171CostleyEdmundPvt85942IGIrishMoiraLurganMaralinBelgiumYpresKIA1916-04-09 00:00:0019Menin Road South Military Cemetery, Ypres, BelgiumCOSTLEY, Private Edmund. Born in Moira, Co. Down, he enlisted at Lurgan, Co. Armagh and served in 2 IG (8594). KIA in Belgium on the 9.4.16 age 19, he is buried in Menin Road South Military Cemetery, Ypres, Belgium, plot 1, row H, grave 36. He was the son of Joseph Henry Costley of Drumcro, Maralin, Lurgan.
172CowanBasil Terence ReillyLt1.5MREnglishRB and 9 LincolnsAntrim?LondonCeylonDunmurryTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-08-06 00:00:0030Helles Memorial, GallipoliCOWAN, Lieutenant Basil Terence Reilly. Born on the 23 May 1885 in the parish of Antrim, he was an accomplished sportsman, “being the holder of several ‘firsts’ for tennis, golf, rowing and swimming”; he was also “in constant demand” as a footballer and cricketer. At the outbreak of the war in August 1914 he was living at “The Park”, Lunugala in Ceylon (Sri Lanka) where he worked as a planter. It was there that he joined a party of volunteers and sailed for England to join up. Examined at London on the 13 December 1914 and, giving his permanent address as his father’s house at 65 Fitzwilliam Square, Dublin, he enlisted there the following day as Private S7565 in 2 Coy., the Rifle Brigade, Ceylon Contingent Special Reserve. Aged 29 and a single man, he was 5’7” tall, weighed 141lbs and had a 38” chest fully expanded with 4” range of expansion. His physical development was described as “good” as was his sight at 6/6 in both eyes. Stationed at Winchester, his career in the Rifle Brigade was short lived as he was discharged at his own request on the 20 January 1915 having applied for a Temporary Commission in the Leinsters or Rifle Brigade. In fact he was commissioned into the 9 Lincolns and at the end of May 1915 was sent to Gallipoli where he was attached to the 1/5 Manchester Regiment. By this point he was probably married to Norah Campbell Cowan of The Waldrons, Eyre Court Road, Seaton, South Devon although when the ceremony took place is not clear.

Writing on the 2 July he described how, “We got into Lemnos last night and went into camp for the night. We are now on our way to the mouth of the Dardanelles, ten miles off, so expect to be in the thick of it before the day is out. In fact I believe the Turks generally shell the boats before they get alongside”. Three weeks later he confirmed how, “The worst shelling we have had was on the day we landed. They started shelling the boat before we got ashore; then the beach had a very warm half-hour of it, but not very much damage was done”. Basil Cowan reached his battalion on the 2 July along with another junior officer Second Lieutenant Philip Box, also of the 9 Lincolns and on attachment to the 1/5 Manchesters.

The battalion had landed at Cape Helles on the tip of the Gallipoli Peninsula on the 6 May and apart from a week at Imbros in the middle of June were still there when Cowan and Box arrived on the 2 July. Since the 23 June, two days after their return from Imbros, they had been in or just behind the firing line at Krithia Nullah alternating with the 6 Manchesters. It was here that Cowan had his first experience of life in the trenches. There had been no major engagements and “quiet day” was a frequent observation in the battalion diary. Nevertheless, there was a more or less constant trickle of casualties, what the army would have considered “normal wastage” and of course those other unpleasantnesses of Gallipoli in the summer time – the heat and the flies. Pulled back to the reserve lines at “Clapham Junction” on the 11 July, Cowan wrote, “We have been in the rest trenches for some days now, as the men were absolutely done up after having been in the firing line for 16 days on end … .” Even here though there was little respite. Nowhere on the allied side of the line at Gallipoli was far from the fighting or out of range of the enemy, so the casualties continued. By the 20th another 5 men had been killed, 11 wounded and one, Private John Brown from Wigan, had died from heart failure. Moved to the Eski Line on the 21st where several days were spent digging saps and a new trench, and then back to Krithia Nullah on the 29th, by the end of the month the battalion’s total casualties for July amounted to at least 44 of whom 14 had been killed.

The start of August was quieter; in the first five days only three men were wounded and the battalion diary for the period records no other details of any sort. It was the calm before the storm. In another attempt to end the stalemate on the peninsula the British had decided to open a new front at Sulva Bay where fresh troops were to be landed from 10pm on the evening of the 6th. This was to coincide with attacks at the existing fronts at Helles and Anzac Cove. At 13.00 on the 5 August orders were issued by 127 Brigade HQ instructing 1/5 Manchesters that they would be involved in an attack the following day in support of 88th Brigade. Their objective was the Turkish trenches (H11a and H11b) that lay to the north of what was known as the Vineyard. The artillery bombardment was to begin at 14.20 and the infantry assault at 15.50.

The attack went in on time and at 4.10 p.m. Brigade HQ received news that parts of H11a and H11b had been captured. However, whatever success there had been was short lived. By 5.35 p.m. the attacks on the two trenches had failed. The NW end of H11b had in fact turned out to be a dummy trench and once in it the men had been exposed to enfilade fire. That, however, does not appear to have been the only or even the main reason for the lack of success. The battalion diarist put it bluntly. “Artillery preparation entirely failed and the infantry attack made against entirely unsubdued rifle and M.G. fire was practically wiped out and failed. Our artillery dropped some shells in our own trench.”

That evening the attack continued using reinforcements from 7 Manchesters. It was no more successful and during the night they had to fall back. The following morning the attacks resumed. The outcome was the same. “Artillery preparation 9 a.m. attack 9.40 a.m. 5th Manc[hesters] … ordered to make another attack on H11a and H11b. We were very badly shelled by our own guns and sustained several casualties from them probably 30. Artillery preparation and consequently infantry attack again failed.” In two days of fighting the battalion had sustained 229 casualties - 20 killed, 158 wounded and 51 missing. Basil Cowan was one of seven officers in the battalion listed as missing believed killed. Another was Philip Box who had arrived with Cowan from the 9 Lincolns and landed with him in Gallipoli at the start of July.

The omens were not good. The Adjutant of the battalion, Captain J.M.B. Sanders who himself was wounded and invalided home two months afterwards, reported how on that day, “we were ordered to storm some of the Turkish trenches. I saw Cowan at the head of his men calling and cheering them on; and although one of his hands was severely wounded, he refused to return to the field hospital, but continued to lead his Company forward. Then I heard a bomb burst and saw Cowan fall. I had no time to halt but as I rode by I saw him lying in one of the trenches, motionless and bleeding profusely. I fear he was mortally wounded”. His death, which had taken place during the attack on the 6th, was not confirmed until early the following summer. He was 30 years old.

Basil Cowan has no known grave; his death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli. He was the husband of Norah Campbell Cowan of The Waldrons, Eyre Court Road, Seaton, South Devon and second and youngest son of Major Samuel K. Cowan of Drenta, Dunmurry 65 Fitzwilliam square, Dublin and Stanhope Gardens, London. His elder brother may have been E.R. Cowan of 22 Adolphus Road, Finsbury Park, London.

In his will dated the 1 July 1915, the day he had arrived at Lemnos, and in which he gave his address as Drenta, Dunmurry, Co. Antrim, he left his estate to his widow who was also the sole executive. His property consisted of £65.19.0 cash, 22 5% preference shares in the Linen Thread Co. Ltd., a one third share of the house and lands of Drenta, Dunmurry valued at about £940 and any balance he had with Messrs. Cox & Co. his bankers. At probate his estate was given a gross value of £329.1.8. In addition, Norah Cowan received a pension of £100 a year and a gratuity of £140. Although it is not clear, a letter to the War Office dated 10 September 1919 from an M or N. C. Ford of 3 Alexander Place, Colyton, S. Devon regarding the estate of Lieutenant B.T. Cowan, suggests that Norah Campbell Cowan may have re-married.
173CowanArchibald (Archie)Rm/Bug303811RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLisburnFranceBelgian borderDOW1916-09-01 00:00:0020Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceCOWAN, Rifleman/Bugler Archibald (Archie). Born in Blaris, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 11 RIR (3038) with whom he embarked from Bordon for France in October 1915. He DoW in France on the 1.9.16 age 20 and is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, France, (close to the Franco-Belgium frontier), plot 2, row F, grave 194. This cemetery is very close to the Belgian border. The headstone inscription reads, “Safe in the arms of Jesus, safe on his gentle breast”. He was the son of Mr. And Mrs. Cowan of 37 Sloan Street, Lisburn.
174CowanJosephRm724211RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-16 00:00:0029Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumCOWAN, Rifleman Joseph. Born in Blaris, he lived in Lisburn where he was employed in the combing department at Hilden Threadworks. Enlisting in Lisburn at the start of the war and serving in A Company 11 RIR (7242), he embarked with them for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Reported missing on the Somme on the 16.7.16 and later as wounded, he recovered in Mill Road Infirmary Hospital, Liverpool before returning to the Front. Reported wounded and subsequently as having been KIA in Belgium on the 16.8.17 aged 29, his death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium, panels 138-140. He was the eldest son of Thomas and Mary Cowan of 9 McKeown Street, Lisburn. On the 13.10.17 his family had the following poem included along with his death notice in the Herald. “He little thought when leaving home, That he would ne’er return again, But on the Battlefield of France, Lie numbered with the slain. Sleep on, sleep on, my darling son, And peaceful be your rest; Mother misses you most of all, Because she loved you best. We have lost a loving brother, And we mourn his absence sore; His loving face and kindly smile, We’ll see on earth no more. Though far away, my dearest brother, And your grave we cannot see, But as long as life and memory lasts, We will remember thee”.
175CowanAlbert WilliamLcpl1748412RIRIrish11 RIR?LisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1918-04-15 00:00:00Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumCOWAN, Lance corporal Albert William. Born and living in Lisburn, before the war he was an apprentice caulker at Queen’s Island. He volunteered in September 1914 and enlisted at Lisburn, in 11 RIR, embarking with them for France, from Bordon, in October 1915. Involved in the fighting on the Somme on the 1.7.16 and at Messines in early June 1917 he came through both engagements without serious injury. However, he was wounded during the fighting at Langemarck in Belgium on the 16 August 1917 which resulted in a prolonged convalescence. Subsequently transferred to 12 RIR (17484), he returned to the front on Good Friday 1918 and was KIA in Belgium two weeks later on the 15.4.18. His death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium, panels 138-140. He was the youngest son of Joseph Cowan of 3 Wallace Avenue, Lisburn and brother of Stephen Cowan who by 1920 was living in Toronto, Canada. In April 1920 his parents and brother inserted In Memoriam notices in the Standard on the second anniversary of his death.
176CowanAndrew Forsyth CrawfordPvt249711116CEFImperialBelfastTorontoDrumbeg/TorontoTorontoFranceAmiensKIA1918-08-08 00:00:0033Hourges Orchard Cemetery, Dormat-sur-la Luce, FranceCOWAN, Private Andrew (Andy) Forsyth Crawford. Born in Belfast on the 29.4.1885 he had an address in Drumbeg and at Dupont Street, Toronto in Canada. A married man (husband of Minnie Cowan) and a motorman by trade, he was 5” 6½” tall, had a 38” chest with 2” expansion, blue eyes and brown hair. According to his attestation papers he had, “small scars on [his] right arm and chin from poisoning”. He enlisted at Toronto on the 5.6.16 aged 31 and served in 116 CI (249711). KIA in France on the 8.8.18 age 33, he was in the same battalion and died on the same day as William George Atkinson. He is buried in Horges Orchard Cemetery, Domart-sur-la-Luce, Somme, France, row A, grave 57 and was the husband of Minnie Cowan of Dupont Street and subsequently 278 Soudan Avenue, Toronto. Cowan, AndrewFCNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
177CraineyWilliam JohnRm90872RIRIrishLisburnBelfastBelgiumYpresKIA1914-11-11 00:00:00Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumCRAINEY, Rifleman William John. Born in Lisburn, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 2 RIR (9087). KIA in Belgium on the 11.11.14, the same date as Samuel Ferris, below, his death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate, Memorial, Belgium.
178CrangleAlbert VictorRm1749213RIRIrishShankillLisburnH'boro AghnathriskH'boroFranceSommeKIA1916-06-28 00:00:0021Martinsart British Cemetery, FranceCRANGLE, Rifleman Albert Victor. Born in Shankill, Belfast, he lived at Aghnathrisk, Hillsborough, Co. Down. Enlisting at Lisburn in C Company 13 RIR (17492) he was wounded (probably) in May 1916 and shortly after, KIA on the Somme on the 28.6.16 aged 21. He and 13 colleagues in his company were killed (10 immediately and 4 later of wounds) by a German shell which landed amongst them as they paraded in Martinsart village square to go on duty. They were all buried in Martinsart British Cemetery plot 1, row A. All Commonwealth War Graves Commission entries for these men give grave 1, presumably it is a communal grave. Of the 14, 7 are on this list, CSM Beaston and Riflemen A.V. Crangle, R. Crawley, S. Hamilton, G. Heenan, T. Mercer and J.G. Thompson. He was the son of James and Rhoda Crangle of Priesthill, Hillsborough, Co. Down, and brother of Herbert Crangle, below.
179CrangleHerbert SLcpl2010851.4SeHScottishBlarisBelfast H'boro AghnathriskH'boroBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-01 00:00:0020New Irish Farm Cemetery, St. Jean-les-Ypres, BelgiumCRANGLE, Lance corporal Herbert S. Born in Blaris, Co. Down, he lived at Aghnathrisk, Hillsborough, Co. Down. Employed by Messrs J. McCausland, seed merchants of Victoria Street, Belfast, he enlisted at Belfast in May 1915 and served in 1/4 SeH (201085). Involved in the Battle of the Somme and wounded at Vimy Ridge in the Spring of 1917, he was KIA in Belgium on the 1.8.17 aged 20, and is buried in New Irish Farm Cemetery, St. Jean-les-Ypres, Belgium, plot 12, row F, grave 18. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of James and Rhoda Crangle of Priesthill, Hillsborough, Co. Down and brother of Albert Victor Crangle, above. His brother-in-law, a Mr. Coburn, lost his arm at Messines in October 1914 and was discharged the following May.Crangle, HerbertSNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
180CrawleyRichardRm1737913RIRIrishH'boroLisburnLarneLarneFranceSommeKIA1916-06-28 00:00:00Martinsart British Cemetery, FranceCRAWLEY, Rifleman Richard. Born in Hillsborough, Co. Down, he lived in Larne, Co. Antrim, enlisted at Lisburn and served in 13 RIR (17379). KIA on the Somme on the 28.6.16, he is buried in Martinsart British Cemetery, France, plot 1, row A, grave 1. He and 13 colleagues in his company were killed (10 immediately and 4 later of wounds) by a German shell which landed amongst them as they paraded in Martinsart village square to go on duty. They were all buried in Martinsart British Cemetery plot 1, row A. The headstone inscription reads, “His duty nobly done”. All Commonwealth War Graves Commission entries for these men give grave 1, presumably it is a communal grave. Of the 14, 7 are on this list, CSM Beaston and Riflemen A.V. Crangle, R. Crawley, S. Hamilton, G. Heenan, T. Mercer and J.G. Thompson. He was the husband of Edith Crawley of 74 Lennonville, Glenarm Road, Larne, Co. Antrim. Crawley, RichardNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
181CrawleyRichardGnr5839120RGASupportH'boroBelfastBelfastBelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-08-07 00:00:0031Thiepval Memorial, FranceCRAWLEY, Gunner Richard. Born at Hillsborough and living in Sandy Row, Belfast, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 120 Siege Battery RGA (5839). KIA on the Somme on the 7.8.16 aged 31 his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 8A. He was the husband of Margaret Crawley of 98 Blythe Street, Belfast.
182CrillyDaniel (Dan)Rm17.2949RIRIrishShankillBelfastBelfastFranceSommeKIA1915-12-08 00:00:0037Sucrerie Military Cemetery, Colincamps, FranceCRILLY, Rifleman Daniel (Dan). Born in Shankill, Belfast, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 9 RIR (17/294). KIA in France on the 8.12.15 aged 37, he is buried in Sucrerie Military Cemetery, Colincamps, France, plot 2, row E, grave 4. There is no headstone inscription. He was the husband of Martha Crilly of 60 King Street, Belfast.
183CroftRobert (Bertie)Cpl783005MGC(T)SupportACC 2848LisburnDublinClandeboyeFranceAmiensKIA1918-08-08 00:00:0024Hangard Communal Cemetery, FranceCROFT, Corporal Robert (Bertie). Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Dublin and served in the ACC (2848), before transferring to the 5 Battalion Tank Corps, MGC(T) (78300). KIA in France on the 8.8.18 aged 24, he is buried in Hangard Communal Cemetery Extension, France, plot 2, row B, grave 4. He was the son of James and Susan Croft of "The Cottages", Clandeboye, Belfast.
184CrossanJohnRm142219RIRIrishShankillBelfastLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-02 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceCROSSAN, Rifleman John. Born in Shankill Belfast, he lived in Lisburn, enlisted at Belfast and served in 9 RIR (14221). Reported wounded and missing in late August/early September 1916 and subsequently KIA on the Somme on the 2.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A and B.
185CrosseyHenryLcpl90611RIRIrishLisburnBelfastLisburnFranceLensKIA1915-03-10 00:00:00Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg-l'Avoue, FranceCROSSEY, Lance Corporal Henry. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RIR (9061). He and his brother Private Robert Crossey who also served in 1 RIR (9062) returned from India with their battalion at the start of the war. KIA in France on the 10.3.15, the Standard reported on the 4.6.15 that he had been listed as killed “some months ago, but last weeks casualty lists posted him as wounded and in hospital.” Clearly it was incorrect. His death is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, France, panel 42 or 43. Robert was also invalided home about that time and was recovering from his wounds. He was wounded again in November or early December 1916. Private William Crossey, a third brother serving in 2 RIR was also in hospital in May/June 1915 recovering from wounds. He had been a well known footballer in the town, playing for Lisburn United F.C. between 1912 and 1914. A fourth brother Private Joseph Crossey, had at that time (June 1915) enlisted in the Royal Scots and was in training at Edinburgh. Of the four brothers, Henry appears to have been the only one not to survive. They were the sons of Mrs. Crossey, a widow, of Gregg Street, Lisburn. Crossey, HenryILC&LM
186CrosseyOliverRm1635313RIRIrishBelfastBelfastCulcaveyCulcaveyFranceSommeDOW1916-06-30 00:00:0020Puchevillers British Cemetery, FranceCROSSEY, Rifleman Oliver. Born in Belfast, he lived at Culcavey, Hillsborough, enlisted at Belfast and served in 13 RIR (16353). He DoW in France on the 30.6.16 aged 20 and is buried in Puchevillers British Cemetery, France, plot 1, row A, grave 11. He was the son of William and Susan Crossey of Thompson Row, Culcavey, Hillsborough.Crossey, OliverPat Geary/Lisburn.com As It Was
187CrosseyWilliamCROSSY, W. Commemorated on Lisburn War Memorial under "Rank Unascertained." There is no positive trace so far.Crossey, WilliamILC&LM
188CrossinEdwardStkK/6960HMS HawkeRNNavyLisburnAt seaNorth SeaKIA/drowned1914-10-15 00:00:0024Chatham Naval Memorial, KentCROSSIN, Stoker 1st Class, Edward. Served in the Royal Navy (K/6960) on HMS Hawke and was KIA on the 15.10.14 age 24 when his ship was sunk by a submarine in the North Sea. He was the son of James and Annie Crossin of Lisburn. His death is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent, panel 4. The Hawke, an old cruiser, was torpedoed with the loss of all but 21 of her crew. Stoker William John Gillespie (below) was killed in the same action. The sinking of the Hawke, and a month earlier the Cressy (on which Joshua Singleton died), the Hogue and Aboukir by the German submarine U9 (or U29), convinced both sides that the submarine was a potent weapon. In March 1915 the Standard carried an article in which it was reported that, “The Aboukir, Cressy and Hogue have been avenged. The submarine U29, which sank these boats, has been sent to the bottom with all hands … This cheerful news has been published by the Admiralty, and may be taken as a fact, though the Admiralty, always careful in their choice of language, only state, ‘they have good reason to believe’ that the German submarine U29 has been sunk”.
189CrothersWilliamRm9932RIRIrishH'boroH'boro A'd'varran?FranceOtherDied1918-06-26 00:00:00Cronenbourg French National Cemetery, Strasbourg, FranceCROTHERS, Rifleman William. Lived at Aghandunvarran, Hillsborough, Co. Down. He enlisted at Hillsborough, and served in 2 RIR (993). He died in France on the 26.6.18 and is buried in Cronenbourg French National Cemetery, Strasbourg, France, plot AB, grave 7. Crothers, WilliamNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
190CrothersWilliam JSgt59811RESupportHomeAnnahiltDied1919-07-14 00:00:0044Annahilt Presbyterian ChurchyardCROTHERS, Sergeant William J. Served in the RE (59811) and died at home on the 14.7.19 aged 44. He is buried in Annahilt Presbyterian Churchyard, Co. Down, grave 264 with his parents William J. and Mary Carruthers. The headstone inscription reads, “And in remembrance of his parents William J. and Mary Carruthers. Interred here”.
191CroweThomasSgt12742RIRIrishDunmurryLisburnBelfastFranceSommeKIA1918-03-24 00:00:0026Pozieres Memorial, FranceCROWE, Sergeant Thomas. Born in Dunmurry, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 2 RIR (I274). KIA on the Somme on the 24.3.18 age 26, his death is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, Somme, France, panels 74 to 76. He was the son of Mrs. E. Crowe of 9 Courtrai Street, Belfast
192CrozierThomasSgt110629RInFIrishLisburnOmaghPortadownDunmurryFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0022Thiepval Memorial, FranceCROZIER, Sergeant Thomas. Born in Lisburn, he lived at Portadown, enlisted at Omagh and served in 9 RInF (11062). KIA in France on the 1.7.16 aged 22, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France. pier and face 15A/B. He was the son of James Crozier of Strathearne, Dunmurry, Belfast.
193CrozierGeorgeRm11958RIRIrishLisburnBelfastFranceAmiensKIA1916-07-02 00:00:00Cayeux Military Cemetery, FranceCROZIER, Rifleman George. Born in Lisburn, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 8 RIR (1195). KIA in France on the 2.7.16 he is buried in Cayeux Military Cemetery, France, plot 3, row A, grave 24.
194CulbertJamesSgt115256RIRIrishLisburnBelfastGreeceSalonikaKIA1916-09-15 00:00:00Doiran Memorial, GreeceCULBERT, Sergeant James. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 6 RIR (11525). KIA in Salonica on the 15.9.16, his death is commemorated on the Doiran Memorial, Greece.
195CummingWilliam HerbertCSM1751813RIRIrishLisburnBangorBangorFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0031Thiepval Memorial, FranceCUMMING, CSM William Herbert. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Bangor and served in 13 RIR (17518). KIA in France on the 1.7.16 aged 31, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France. pier and face 15A/B. He was the son of Mrs. M.A. Cumming of 16/18 High Street, Bangor and the late A.R. Cumming.
196CunninghamGeorgeSap2424RESupportH'boroRutherglen, Lanarkshire GlasgowTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-08-06 00:00:0019Helles Memorial, GallipoliCUNNINGHAM, Sapper George. Born in Hillsborough, he enlisted at Rutherglen, Lanarkshire and served in 2nd. Field Company RE (2424). KIA in Gallipoli on the 6.8.15 aged 19, his death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panels 23-25. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. William Cunningham of Farmeloan Road, Rotherglen, Glasgow.
197CunninghamJohn HamiltonRm7328.9RIRIrishLisburnLisburnDromoreCarrickFranceSommeDOW1916-06-26 00:00:0032Forceville Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceCUNNINGHAM, Rifleman John Hamilton. Born in Lisburn, Co. Antrim, he lived at Dromore, Co. Down, enlisted at Lisburn, and served in 8/9 RIR (732). He DoW on the Somme on the 26.6.16 aged 32 and is buried in Forceville Communal Cemetery, Extension, France, plot 1, row E, grave 3. He was the son of the late James and Sarah Cunningham of Carrickfergus, Co. Antrim.
198CunninghamWilliamGds62801IGIrishDonegalDublinLisburnTerrawee, Co. DonegalFranceSommeKIA1916-09-12 00:00:0024Thiepval Memorial, FranceCUNNINGHAM, Guardsman William. Born in Donegal, Co. Donegal, he had an address at Terrawee, Co. Londonderry and Lisburn where he was a police constable in the RIC at Smithfield. He and four other constables (George Bell, Christopher Coldwell, P. Shields and William Stewart) had left Lisburn on the 29 December 1914 to enlist in the Irish Guards. “Large crowds” had assembled to see them off, and each was presented with a box of cigarettes before they left. Marching from Smithfield barracks, they were escorted by a guard of honour made up of men in 11 RIR. According to the Standard, “the constables went direct to London” although the WOCL records that Cunningham enlisted in Dublin and served in 1 IG (6280). Wounded once before his death he was KIA on the Somme on the 12.9.16 aged 24. His death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 7D. He was the son of Mitchell and Maggie Cunningham of Terrawee, Glencely, Co. Donegal. Of the five constables who left Lisburn that afternoon late in December 1914, at least three Bell (above), Coldwell (above) and Cunningham, were to die before the war was over. Shields appears to have survived, and Stewart may have done so as well, although his fate is less certain. A Guardsman William Stewart who was born in Hamilton Lanark, enlisted in West Calder, Midlothian and served in 2 IG (7365), DoW in France on the 15.11.15 aged 27. Buried in Longuenesse (St. Omer) Souvenir Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France, plot, 3, row A, grave 12, he was the husband of Janet Stewart of 22 Blantyre Terrace, Edinburgh.
199CurrieJames MalcolmsonGnr3168775 BdeCEF CFAImperialBelfastTorontoTorontoLisburnFranceRearDOW1917-11-02 00:00:0024St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, FranceCURRIE, Gunner James Malcolmson. Born in Belfast on the 12.4.1893, he emigrated to Canada in about 1911 “and found employment in the famous Eaton Stores” and lived at 92 Longford Avenue, Toronto. He was a single man and a clerk by profession, 5’ 6½” tall with a 35” chest and 3” range of expansion. Of a fresh complexion with fair hair and blue eyes, he also had a brownish birthmark and mole on the back of his neck, a scar on his left leg and two moles on both his left and right sides. He enlisted, with no previous military experience, at Toronto on the 29.1.16 age 22 years and 9 months and served in 5 Brigade CFA (316877). He DoW in France on the 2.11.17 age 24 and is buried in St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France, section P, plot 3, row S, grave 10B. He was the son of William John and Sarah Currie of 48 Ballynahinch Road, Lisburn, Co. Down.
200CurryWilliamRm252511RIRIrishLisburnBelfastLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceCURRY, Rifleman William. Born in Lisburn, he lived at 11 Antrim Street, in the town, enlisted at Belfast and served in B Company 11 RIR (2525) with whom he embarked for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Listed as wounded and missing he was subsequently (in October) recorded as KIA on the Somme on the 1 July 1916. His death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, faces A/B. He was the husband of Mary Sarah Curry of 11 Antrim Street, Lisburn with whom he had a young family of six. She included the following poem along with her husband’s death notice in the Standard for the 10 October. “If I could have raised his dying head, Or heard his last farewell, The blow would not have been so hard, To one who loved him well. We often sit and think of you, when we are all together, Our family chain is broken now. A loved one gone forever”. In the Herald for the 5 July 1919 she again remembered his passing. “There is a link death cannot sever. Fond love and remembrance last forever”. His death is also commemorated on the family headstone in Lisburn Cemetery which records that two of his children died in their infancy, Thomas aged four and Elizabeth sixteen months. Mary Curry survived until 1958. William Curry was the son of the late James Curry, and of Letitia Curry of 29 Antrim Street, Lisburn. His brothers were also on active service.
201CurryJohnCURRY, Rifleman John. He is commemorated on Lisburn War Memorial but there is no positive trace so far.
202DaleyHerbertOsSS/4231HMS PantherRNNavyDunmurryAt seaOff Firth of ForthKIA/drowned1914-09-05 00:00:0021Chatham Naval Memorial, KentDALEY, Ordinary Seaman Herbert. Served in the Royal Navy on HMS Panther (SS/4231). KIA in an engagement with a submarine off the Firth of Forth on the 5.9.14 age 21, his death is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent, panel 3. He was the son of George and Sarah Ann Daley of 16 Milfort Avenue, Dunmurry.
203DaltonDavidPvt17680MGC(I)Support18941 11 RIRLurganure, MazeLisburnLurganure, MazeLurganure, MazeBelgiumPoperingheDOW1917-08-31 00:00:0025Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, BelgiumDALTON, Private David. Born and living in Lurganure, Co. Antrim, he was a gardener by trade and was employed by Sir Thomas Dixon at Hillsborough Castle. He enlisted at Lisburn shortly after the outbreak of war and served in 11 RIR (18941), embarking with them for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Invalided back in March 1916 he only returned to the front on the 10 August 1917. Transferred to 143 Company MGC(I) (17680), he DoW in Belgium on the 31.8.17 aged 25 and is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, Belgium, plot 18, row F, grave 3. The headstone inscription, which his mother also use for the “In Memoriam” notice she inserted in the Standard on the 29.8.19, reads, “His richest gift he laid on the alter of life”. He was the son of Maria J. and the late Robert Dalton of Lurganure, Maze, Lisburn, Co. Antrim. His brother Private W.J. Dalton served with the North Lancashire Regiment in India, East Africa and Egypt. He appears to have survived the war. A younger brother worked as an apprentice in the offices of the Lisburn Standard.
204DaltonAlexanderFm865477HMS EagletMMRNavyBelfastHomeLisburnDied1919-03-02 00:00:0025Blaris Old Cemetery, LisburnDALTON, Fireman Alexander. Served in the MMR (865447) on HMS Eaglet. He died on the 2.3.19 age 25 and is buried in Blaris Old Cemetery, grave 561. He was the son of William Dalton of 128 Bristol Street, Belfast.
205DavidsonThomasPvt2488216MREnglishDromoreBelfast H'boro A'd'varran?BelgiumYpresKIA1917-12-28 00:00:00Hooge Crater Cemetery, BelgiumDAVIDSON, Private Thomas. Born in Dromore, Co. Down, he lived at Aghandunvarren, Hillsborough, Co. Down, enlisted at Belfast and served in 16 MR (24882). KIA in Belgium on the 28.12.17, he is buried in Hooge Crater Cemetery, Belgium, plot 8, row C, grave 12. There is no headstone inscription.
206DavisJamesPvt105542RInFIrishShankillBelfastBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1914-10-20 00:00:00Ploegsteert Memorial, BelgiumDAVIS  Private James. Born in Shankill, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 2 RInF (10554). KIA in Belgium on the 20.10.14, his death is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium, panel 5.
207DavisCharlesPvt18573MGC(I)SupportHLI 19390BallynahinchHamilton, LanarkshireMagheraknock, BallynahinchMagheraknock, BallynahinchFranceSommeDOW1916-07-15 00:00:0022Thiepval Memorial, FranceDAVIS  Private Charles. Born in Ballynahinch, he lived at Magheraknock, Co. Down (north west of Ballynahinch and east of Annahilt). Enlisting in 10/11 HLI (19390) probably with his brother James, at Hamilton, Lanarkshire he subsequently transferred to MGC(I) (18573). He DoW on the Somme on the 15.07.16 aged 22 and his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 5C and 12C. He was the son of James and Ellen Davis of Magheraknock, Ballynahinch, Co. Down and brother of James Davis, below. Davis, CharlesNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
208DavisJamesLcpl193912021-11-10 00:00:00HLIScottishBallynahinchHamilton, LanarkshireMagheraknock, BallynahinchMagheraknock, BallynahinchFranceRearDOW1917-04-25 00:00:0031Etaples Military Cemetery, FranceDAVIS  Lance Corporal James M.M. Born in Ballynahinch, he lived at Magheraknock, Co. Down (north west of Ballynahinch and east of Annahilt). Enlisting in 10/11 HLI (19391) probably with his brother Charles, at Hamilton, Lanarkshire, he DoW in France on the 25.4.17 aged 31 and is buried in Etaples Military Cemetery, France, plot 19, row H, grave 4. He was the son of James and Ellen Davis of Magheraknock, Ballynahinch, Co. Down and brother of Charles Davis, above.
209DavisMaxwellRm2029114RIRIrishBelfastBelfastHomeDied1918-06-30 00:00:0024Drumbo Presbyterian Churchyard, Co. DOWnDAVIS, Rifleman Maxwell. Born in and enlisted at Belfast, he served in 14 RIR (20291) dyeing at “home” on the 30.6.18 age 24. He is buried in Drumbo Presbyterian Churchyard, grave 133. The headstone inscription reads, “Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord”.
210DavisonJames HallRm1642611RIRIrishMoiraBelfastMeghaberryMoiraFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0019Connaught Cemetery, Thiepval, FranceDAVISON, Rifleman James Hall. Born in Moira, Co. Down, he lived at Yew Tree, Meghaberry and was educated for a time at Lisburn Intermediate School. He was working in the Clones Branch of the Ulster bank on the outbreak war and enlisted at Belfast in 11 RIR (16426) with whom he embarked for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Writing to his father, Captain Smith told him that his son had been recommended for a D.C.M for jumping into a river and saving a soldier from drowning. He had also been recommended for a commission by Lt-Col. Pakenham. Originally reported missing in July 1916, it was January or February 1917 before his father was told officially that he “must now be regarded as dead”. He had in fact been KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 age 19 and is buried in Connaught Cemetery, Thiepval, France, plot 3, row A, grave 1. There is no headstone inscription. What was known of the circumstances of Hall Davison’s death were described to his parents in a letter sent to them by Captain Smith. “The last that was seen or heard of [him] was that he was sent back by Major Jenkins (see below) with a message from the third German trench. He was”, Smith went on, “well known as a particularly fearless and conscientious soldier, keen on his duty and well liked by all”. His death is also commemorated on the family headstone in Moira Presbyterian churchyard. His father, James A. Davison of Yew Tree Hill, Moira, died in Sydney, Australia on the 12.4.41 as did his brother William John (Bill) on the 10.12.46 aged 40. He would have been 10 at the time of Hall’s death.
211DawsonDavidPvt1061881CEF CMR SasRImperialStoneyfordManitoba, BrandonStoneyfordFranceLensDOW1917-07-16 00:00:0029Noeux-les-Mines Communal Cemetery, FranceDAWSON, Private David. Born in Stoneyford on the 26.1.1888, he was a single man and farmer by profession. A member of the militia, he enlisted at Brandon, Manitoba on the 1 or 24.12.14 aged 26. 5’ 4” in height he had 33-36” chest (3” expansion), a scar on his left arm, fair complexion, blue eyes and brown hair. Serving in the 1 CMR (SasR) (106188), he DoW in France on the 16.7.17 aged 29 and is buried in Noeux-Les-Mines Communal Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France, plot 2, row E, grave 31. The fourth son of Richard James and Jane Anna Dawson of Riverside House, Bovolgan, Stoneyford, Lisburn, he had two brothers serving with the Australian Army Medical Corps in France. They appear to have survived the war. Noeux-les-Mines is a town 6 kilometres south of Bethune on the main road to Arras. Dawson, DavidNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
212DeddisThomasLcpl50666RIRIrishH'boroDownpatrickBelfastGreeceSalonikaDOW1917-06-05 00:00:00Struma Military Cemetery, GreeceDEDDIS, Lance corporal Thomas. Born in Hillsborough, Co. Down and living at Belfast, he enlisted at Downpatrick, and served in 6 RIR (5066). He DoW in Salonica on the 5.6.17 and is buried in Struma Military Cemetery, Greece, plot 8, row B, grave 2.
213DempsterHughSap64563RESupportBallymacarrettBelfastH'boro Corcreeny?HomeLancashireDied1916-06-05 00:00:00Maghull (St Andrew's) Churchyard, LancashireDEMPSTER, Sapper Hugh. Born in Ballymacarrett, Co. Down, he lived at Corcreeny, Hillsborough, enlisted at Belfast and served in 121 Field Company, RE (64563). He died at “home” on the 5.6.16 and is buried in Maghull (St. Andrew’s) churchyard, Lancashire, grave 504. There are no next of kin details put he may have been a brother of William Dempster below. Note the consecutive numbers.
214DempsterWilliam JSap64562RESupportBallymacarrettBelfastH'boroFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceDEMPSTER, Sapper William J. Born in Ballymacarrett, Co. Down, he lived at Hillsborough, enlisted at Belfast and served in 150 Field Company, RE (64562). KIA in France on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 8A and 8D. There are no next of kin details put he may have been a brother of Hugh Dempster above. Note the consecutive numbers.
215DennisonRobertRm53651RIRIrishLambegLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1918-10-14 00:00:0038Tyne Cot Cemetery, BelgiumDENNISON, Rifleman Robert. Born in Lambeg, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 1 RIR (5365). KIA in Belgium on the 14.10.18 aged 38, he is buried in Tyne Cot Cemetery, Passchendaele, Belgium, plot 58, row F, grave 22. There is no headstone inscription. He was the husband of Sarah Dennison of 71 Bridge Street, Lisburn.
216DickSamuelLcpl255912RIRIrish11 RIRLisburnDrumbegDrumbegBelgiumPoperingheDOW1918-10-13 00:00:0021Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, BelgiumDICK, Lance corporal Samuel. A resident of Drumbeg, he was an employee of Messrs. John Shaw Brown & Sons of Edenderry and a member of Drumbeg UVF. He enlisted at Lisburn and served in 11 RIR, Lewis gun section, embarking with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. Subsequently transferred to 12 RIR (2559), he DoW at a casualty clearing station in Belgium on the 13.10.18 aged 21 and is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, Belgium, plot 30, row B, grave 26. The headstone inscription reads, “Faithful unto death”. He was the son of Samuel and Margaret Dick of Drumbeg, Dunmurry, Co. Down. His death was also commemorated on the family headstone in Drumbo Presbyterian graveyard by his brother William Dick. Samuel Dick senior died on the 29.3.62 aged 91 and Margaret on the 9.5.35 aged 58. Dick, SamuelNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
217DickeyRobertPvt2645212RSScottishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-15 00:00:0026Quarry Cemetery, Montauban, FranceDICKEY, Private Robert. Born in Lisburn, he lived at Bradbury's Buildings in the town where he enlisted, serve in 12 RS (26452). KIA on the Somme on the 15.7.16 aged 26, he is buried in Quarry Cemetery, Montauban, France, plot 2, row L, grave 9. The headstone inscription reads, "RIP". He was the husband of Sarah Ann Dickey and the son of John and Elizabeth Dickey of 23 Market Street, Lisburn. A poem commemorating his death, probably written by his parents, was published in the Standard on the 8.9.16.
218DicksonSamuelPvt101153CEF CORImperialLisburnCanadaLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA?1915-05-02 00:00:0021Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumDICKSON, Private Samuel. Born in Lisburn on the 22.8.1893 he had lived at Gregg Street in the town. A labourer by trade, he had 1 years military experience in the "R.G. Toronto." 5'7 1/2" in height, he had a 35" chest with 3" expansion, a dark complexion, grey eyes and dark brown hair. Certified fit for overseas service on the 29.8.14, he enlisted at Valcartier, Canada on the 22.9.14 in the 7th battalion, subsequently 3 CI COR (10115). He died on the 2.5.15 age 21 and his death is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium, panels 18-30. He was the son of Robert J. and Mary A. Dickson of 135 Gregg Street, Lisburn.
219DicksonThomasDvr867915 BdeCEF CFAImperialBelfastCanadaBallinderry/CanadaHomeKentDOW (air raid)1915-10-13 00:00:0033Shorncliffe Military Cemetery, KentDICKSON, Driver Thomas. Born in Belfast on the 26.4.1882 and a farmer by profession he was 5’ 7½”tall and had a 37” chest with 3½” expansion. He was married, had served in the Boer War and had 7 years military experience, 2 years and 9 months with the RHA and 4 years and 3 months with the RFA. He enlisted at Portage La Graine (or Fraine), in Canada on the 12.5.15 aged 33 and was posted to 18th Battery, 5th Brigade, CFA (86791). He DoW received in an air raid on the 13.10.15 age 33 and was buried in Shorncliffe Military Cemetery, Kent, plot O, grave 311. He was the son of Richard and Elizabeth Dickson of Ballinderry, Co. Antrim, and husband of Lillie Dickson of Ryanton, Manitoba.
220DicksonSamuelRm645611RIRIrishBallinderryClandeboyeBallinderryBalinderryFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0024Thiepval Memorial, FranceDICKSON, Rifleman Samuel. Born and living in Ballinderry, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Clandeboye and served in D Company 11 RIR (6456), embarking with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. Listed as wounded and missing and subsequently KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 24, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, faces A/B. He was the son of Amelia Dickson of Lower Ballinderry, Co. Antrim.
221DicksonThomasGnr4143147 Bty 41 BdeRFASupportDromaraBelfastBelfastFranceCambrai/ArrasDOW1918-08-29 00:00:0021Vis-en-Artois Memorial, FranceDICKSON, Gunner Thomas. Born in Dromara, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 47 Battery, 41 Brigade, RFA (41431). He DoW in France on the 29.8.18 age 21, and his death is commemorated on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial, Pas de Calais, France, panel 3. He was the son of William and Agnes Dickson of 30 Peveril Street, Ormeau Road, Belfast.
222DoakeSamuel HenryMaj52 BdeRFASupportGlenlagan, DromaraEastbourne/London/KinnalenFranceArrasKIA1918-03-30 00:00:0025La Targette British Cemetery, FranceDOAKE, Major Samuel Henry DSO. A native of Glenlagan, Dromara, Co. Down, he was educated St. Paul's School, passing second into RMA Woolwich. Commissioned into the Royal Artillery in 1912, he landed in France in August 1914 and served continuously at the front for three and a half years. He was serving in 52 Army Brigade, RFA when he was KIA near Arras on the 30.3.18 age 25. He is buried in La Targette British Cemetery, Neuville St. Vaast, Pas De Calais, France, plot 1, row J, grave 1. He was the son of the late Richard Baxter Doake of "Redmeade," 9 Granville Road, Eastbourne, and the late Mary Elizabeth Doake. A plaque in 1st Dromara Presbyterian church was erected to “commemorate the generous gift of £1500 given by Richard Baxter Doake of Kinallen and London and Mary Elizabeth Doake in gratitude to God that their three children Violette, Vere and Henry have been spared and given strength to serve their country so long and bravely through the Great War 1914-18”. However, it goes on to record that, “Since the above was written Major Henry Doake RFA DSO was killed in action near Arras 30 March 1918”.
223DobbinWilliam Leonard PriceCpt2RIRIrishVictoria, AustraliaDunmurryFranceSommeKIA1918-03-21 00:00:0020Pozieres Memorial, FranceDOBBIN, Captain William Leonard Price MC. Born in Victoria, Australia, he served in 2 RIR. KIA at Contescourt on the Somme on the 21.3.18 age 20, his death is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, France, panels 74 to 76. He was the son of Major William Wood Dobbin, MBE of Osborne, Dunmurry and the late Emily Josophine Cuzens Dobbin.
224DobbinAlbert EAcm298101RAFAir ForceBelfastHomeDrumboDied1919-05-28 00:00:0018Drumbo (Holy Trinity) Churchyard, Ballylesson, Co. DownDOBBIN, Aircraftman 2nd. Class Albert E. Served in the RAF (298101). He died at “home” on the 28.5.19 age 18 and is buried in Drumbo (Holy Trinity) Church Of Ireland Churchyard. The headstone inscription reads, “Therefore be ye also ready. Matthew 24 ch. 44th. Verse”. He was the son of Hugh and Jane Scott Dobbin of 115 Hillman Street, Belfast.
225DoddsJohnPvt69451RInFIrishLisburnBelfastEgyptGallipoliDOW1915-08-31 00:00:00Cairo War Cemetery, EgyptDODDS, Private John. Born in Lisburn, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RInF (6945). He DoW received in Gallipoli on the 31.8.15 and is buried in Cairo War Cemetery, Egypt, row D, grave 74.
226DoddsMichaelPvt34661RIrFIrishMagherasaul?LisburnLisburnLisburnFranceArrasKIA1917-04-09 00:00:0019Point-du-Jour Military Cemetery, Athies, FranceDODDS, Private Michael. Born in Magherasaul, Co. Down, he lived in Lisburn where he enlisted and served in 1 RIrF (3466). KIA in France on the 9.4.17 aged 19, he is buried in Point-du-Jour Military Cemetery, Athies, (near Arras), France, plot 1 row A, grave 2. He was the brother of Miss Wilhelmina Dodds of 15 Young Street, Lisburn.
227DonaghyJamesPvt17622RIrF GarIrish5928 RIRLisburnBelfastBallynahinchGreeceSalonika1918-01-02 00:00:00Salonika Military Cemetery, GreeceDONAGHY, Private James. Born at Lisburn, Co. Antrim, he lived in Ballynahinch, enlisted at Belfast and served in the RIR (5928), subsequently transferred to 2 Garrison battalion RIrF (G1762). He died in Salonica on the 2.1.18 and is buried in Salonika Military Cemetery, Greece, grave 1334.
228DonaldsonDavidPvt94553RInFIrishLisburnBelfastLisburnUSAHomeBelfastDied1918-07-12 00:00:0026Milltown Cemetery, BelfastDONALDSON, Private David. Born and living in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 3 RInF (9455). He died at “home” on the 12.7.18 aged 26 and is buried in Milltown Cemetery, Belfast, plot B, row KE, grave 5. He was the son of David Donaldson of 133 Main Street, Claremont, New Hampshire, U.S.A.
229DoneganThomasSgt89401RInFIrishLisburnBelfastTurkeyGallipoliDOW/KIA1915-06-29 00:00:00Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery, GallipoliDONEGAN, Sergeant Thomas. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RInF (8940). KIA in Gallipoli on the 29.6.15, he was either buried in Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery, Gallipoli, row B, grave 40, or his death is commemorated on a memorial in the same graveyard. A brother of Pvt. Samuel Donegan, above, two other brothers Corporal Albert Donegan 6 RIrF and Sergeant James Donegan, 6 and 2 RIR, also served on the Western Front.
230DoneganSamuelPvt127471RInFIrishLisburnBelfastLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Serre Road Cemetery No.2, FranceDONEGAN, Private Samuel. Born in Lisburn, where he lived at 74 Hill Street, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RInF (12747). He saw action at Gallipoli in 1915 but was reported MIA and subsequently KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 and is buried in Serre Road, Cemetery No.2, France, plot 6, row A, grave 17. He and his wife (also of 74 Hill Street) had five children, the youngest, a daughter was born in late July/early August 1916. Her father had hoped to get home in time for what the Standard called, “the interesting event”. Instead, at the time of her birth, he was missing in action. It may have been though that little hope was entertained of him ever turning up - the article in the Standard which reported that he was missing also referred to him as “the late” Private Donegan! He was the brother of Sgt. Thomas Donegan, below, who was killed at the Dardanelles in June 1915. Two other brothers, Corporal Albert Donegan 6 RIrF and Sergeant James Donegan, 6 and 2 RIR, also served on the Western Front.
231DonnellyThomasPvt163995RIrFIrishArmaghArmaghTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-08-07 00:00:00Helles Memorial, GallipoliDONNELLY, Private Thomas. Born in and enlisting at Armagh, he served in 5 RIrF (16399). KIA in Gallipoli on the 7.8.15, his death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panels 178-180.
232DonnellyHughPvt119406RSFScottishLisburnGlasgowLisburnFranceLensDied1915-09-26 00:00:00Loos Memorial, FranceDONNELLY, Private Hugh. Born and living in Smithfield, Lisburn, he was employed at the netting department at Hilden. A keen footballer and a member of Lisburn United F.C., he enlisted at Glasgow and served in 6 RSF (11940). He died in France on the 26.9.15 and his death is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, France, panels 46-49. Two brothers as well as his father were also on active service. His mother did not receive official confirmation of his death until October 1916.
233DonnellySamuelPvt2474815RSScottishLisburnLisburnLisburn?FranceArrasKIA1917-04-28 00:00:00Arras Memorial, Faubourg D'Amiens Cemetery, FranceDONNELLY, Private Samuel. Born in and enlisting at Lisburn he served in 15 RS (24748). Listed in the Standard as a “Lisburn Casualty” when the paper reported that he had been wounded in May or June 1916, he was KIA in France on the 28.4.17. His death is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France, bay 5.
234DormanWilliam JohnRm593769LCSupport16RIR 240 Ballycasborough,Co. DOWnLurganCarnbane, LisburnHomeStirlingDied1918-10-22 00:00:0032Stirling Cemetery, ScotlandDORMAN, Rifleman William John. Born in Ballycasborough, Co. Down, he lived at Carnbane, Lisburn, Co. Down. He enlisted at Lurgan and served in 16 RIR 240 before being transferred to 459th. Company Labour Corps (593769). He died in Scotland on the 22.10.18 aged 32 and is buried in Stirling (Marplace) Cemetery, Scotland, section YZ, grave 13. He was the son of Carlisle and Alice Dorman.
235DornanGeorgePvt169451RInFIrishLisburnGlasgowLisnagarvey, LisburnFranceRearDOW1917-05-21 00:00:00Abbeville Communal Cemetery, FranceDORNAN, Private George. Born in Lisburn, he was a veteran of the Boer War, re-enlisted at Glasgow and served in 1 RInF (16945). Involved in the landings at Sulva Bay in Gallipoli where he subsequently contracted malaria, he was back at the Front for three months before he DoW in France on the 21.5.17. He is buried in Abbeville Communal Cemetery, France, plot 3, row A, grave 11. He was the son of Robert Dornan of Lisnagarvey Cottages, Lisburn.
236DornanGeorge IrwinLcpl164144AEFImperialBelfastPerth W.A.Freemantle W.A.Belfast/FreemantleFranceSommeKIA1918-04-07 00:00:0032Villers Bretonneux Military cemetery, FranceDORNAN, Lance corporal George Irwin. Born in Belfast between May and September 1885 he was educated there before emigrating to Australia in about 1910 aged 25. This was also the year of his father’s death. A grocer (or dairy produce merchant according to his application to join the AIF) by trade, he was a single man aged 30 and living at 59 McCleary Street, Freemantle when he enlisted in the AIF at Perth W.A. on the 13.1.16. Given his preliminary medical examination that day (although his military service is dated from the 12.2.16), he had a dark complexion, grey eyes and black hair. 5’ 5” tall, he had a 33” to 35” chest and weighed 139 lbs. Recorded as having been vaccinated in infancy his vision was 6/6 in the right eye and 6/9 in the left. Having no military experience when he enlisted, he may have done at least part of his training at Blackboy Hill before being posted as a Private to the 1st Reinforcements for the 44 AI (1641) on the 3 June 1916. Three days later he embarked for England from Freemantle, Western Australia on the “Suevic”. Arriving at Plymouth on the 21 July he was taken on strength on the 13 October and left Southampton for France on the 25 November. Placed on a charge for being absent without leave on the night of the 21/22 July 1917 he was given four days Field Punishment No. 2 and lost five days pay amounting to £1.5s.0d. His crime had been, “absenting himself without leave in that he was absent from his quarters from Tattoo 21/7/17 [9.30 p.m.] until Reveille [6 a.m.] 22/7/17. 8½ hours”. Not that this appears to have been held against him. On the 1 November that year he was promoted to Lance Corporal and a note in his service record shows that he was due “two blue chevrons”. Admitted sick to hospital on the 13 March 1918 he was diagnosed as suffering from Scabies. Re-joining his unit a week later on the 20th, he was KIA at Saille-le-Sec on the Somme on the 7 April 18 aged 32. Originally buried about 800 yards east north east of the village, his body was subsequently exhumed and re-buried in Villers Bretonneux Military Cemetery, France, plot 13, row D, grave 7. There is no headstone inscription. His death is also commemorated on the family headstone in Cargycreevy Presbyterian churchyard where both his parents are buried. He was the son of James Dorn (born 1854, died 1910) and Minnie Dornan (born 1857, died 1921) of 30 Madrid Street, Belfast. The legates in his will were his mother, sister Margretta (Greta) Sarah Dornan and brothers John and James. His uncle Frederick Ernest Dornan of South Terrace, Freemantle was named as executor although he may have passed some of this responsibility onto his eldest nephew John with whom he lived. His effects were sent to his mother in May 1918 and on the 11.6.18 she was granted a pension of 40 shillings per fortnight beginning on the 15th of the month. His brother John received his war medals in March 1922.
237DorrityGeorgeRm1644314RIRIrishBallylessonBelfastStranmillisFranceSommeKIA1916-04-06 00:00:0021Hamel Military Cemetery, FranceDORRITY, Rifleman George. Born in Ballylesson, Belfast, he enlisted at Belfast and served in B Company 14 RIR (YCV) (16443). KIA on the Somme on the 6.4.16 age 21, he is buried in Hamel Military Cemetery, Beaumont-Hamel, France, plot 1, row E, grave 22. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of William Dorrity of 29 Elaine Street, Stranmillis, Belfast who died on the 19.11.1939 and Margaret Ann Dorrity who died on the 7.8.1925. His death is also commemorated on the family headstone in Drumbo Parish Churchyard, Ballylesson.Dorrity, GeorgePat Geary/Enid Dorrity
238DouganThomasLcpl19472LRIrishGreenockBelfastHilden, LisburnHildenFranceSommeKIA1918-03-27 00:00:00Pozieres Memorial, FranceDOUGAN, Lance corporal Thomas. Born in Greenock, Renfrew, he lived at 163 Mill Street, Hilden, Lisburn with his wife and before the war had worked for the Pearl Assurance Company. He enlisted at Belfast and served in 2 LR (1947). KIA in France on the 27.3.18, his death is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, France.
239DouglasSamuel JohnRm128511RIRIrishDromaraLisburnRavarnette, LisburnRavarnette, LisburnBelgiumMessinesKIA1917-05-29 00:00:0034Pond Farm Cemetery, Wulverghem, BelgiumDOUGLAS, Rifleman Samuel John. Born in Dromara, he lived at Ravarnette, enlisted at Lisburn and served in 11 RIR (1285) with whom he embarked for France from Bordon in October 1915. A brief report in the Standard on the 12.11.15 stated that he had been accidentally injured and hospitalized. KIA in Belgium on the 29.5.17 aged 34; he was the son of James Douglas of Ravarnette, Lisburn, Co. Down, and the late Agnes Douglas. In a letter to his father written that day, Second Lieutenant D. Thompson wrote, “It is with profound sorrow [that] I write to you about your son who was killed whilst nobly at his post on the night of the 28-29th May, and I feel incapable of expressing what I feel for you all, and what he had been to us. He has been a good soldier and was ready and willing to do his duty. I was speaking to him about an hour before he was killed, and I was impressed by his cheerfulness. … He will be greatly missed by us all”. Andrew Gibson the Presbyterian Chaplain to the battalion also wrote the following day saying that, “it was my sad duty to conduct the funeral service over his grave yesterday. He was buried in a little cemetery near the lines whe[re], with others who have also laid down their lives, he sleeps, ‘till the day break and the shadows flee away’. This is a heavy burden of sorrow you are asked to bear”. Samuel Douglas is buried in Pond Farm Cemetery, Wulverghem, Belgium, row O, grave 16. The headstone inscription reads, “He sleeps till the day breaks and the shadows flee away”. The Herald for the 16 June 1917 carried death notices inserted by his parents, his sister and brother-in-law Maggie and Bob Rainey of Tanaghbrick, Lisburn, and his brothers and sisters-in-law James and Maggie Douglas of 5 Edward Street, Portadown, William and Lizzie Douglas of 48 Harrybrook Street Belfast, Paton and Minnie Douglas of 38 Legale Street, Belfast and Robert and Martha Douglas of 69 Legale Street, Belfast. Five of the six notices included poems, the following from his “broken-hearted” mother and father. “Could I have raised his dying head, Or heard his last farewell; The blow would not have been so hard, For those that loved him well. Some may think that we forget you, When at times we are apt to smile; Little knowing the grief that’s hidden, Neath the surface all the while”. And from his sister, Maggie Rainey, “Oh! Thou, Who driest the mourner’s tear, How dark this world would be, If, when distressed and wounded here, We could not fly to thee! The dear one who, in duty’s cause, Has fallen in the fight; Oh! God above, in Thy great love, Be with us till we meet above”. His brother William was on active service at the time but appears to have survived the war. After the war, on the 31 May 1919, an In Memoriam notice appeared in the Herald inserted by his father, sisters, brothers, sisters-in-law and brothers-in-law whose address was now given as Ravarnette, Lisburn. There was no mention of his mother. It read, “Two years have passed and still we miss the one we loved so dear; Still in our hearts a vacant place that time can never fill. The fight is o’er, the victory won, but oh! the grief and pain, and longing for the one that sleeps alone, across the main. Until the day break and the shadows flee away”.Douglas, SamuelJohnNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
240DowdsCharles JohnLcpl80071.6ASHScottishLisburnDunoon, ArgylshireLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-09-26 00:00:0022AIF Burial Ground, Grasslane, Flers, FranceDOWDS, Lance Corporal Charles John. Born in Lisburn, he lived on the Ballynahinch Road in the town, enlisted at Dunoon, Argylshire and served in 1/6 ASH (8007). KIA in France on the 26.9.16 aged 22, he is buried in the A.I.F. Burial Ground, Grass Lane, Flers, France, plot 5 row D, grave 16. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of Charles and Eliza Jane Dowds of 73 Ballynahinch Road, Lisburn. His mother inserted a poem with his death notice in the Standard on the 20.10.16. It read, “His warfare o’er, his battle fought, His victory won though dearly bought; He fought so well, he was so brave, He slumbers now in a soldier’s grave”.
241DowningJames2Lt6RIrRIrishBelfastHillhall, LisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-09-03 00:00:0032Thiepval Memorial, FranceDOWNING, Second Lieutenant James. Born in Belfast, and living at Hillhall, Lisburn, he served his apprenticeship with the firm of Messrs. Robert Watson and Co. Ltd., Donegall Street, Belfast and before the war had been working in Dublin. Commissioned on the 16.11.15, he served in 3 RIrR, attached to the 6th. battalion. KIA on the Somme on the 3.9.16 aged 32, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 3A. He was the fifth son of John and Rebecca Downing of Hollyhouse, Hill Hall, Lisburn, Co. Down and later of 46 South Parade, Belfast. Downing, JamesPat Geary/IWM
242DuffinCharles FrancisCptLC GALSupportRIR?DunmurryCraigavadFranceRearKIA1918-03-13 00:00:0023Longuenesse Souvenir Cemetery, St. Omer, FranceDUFFIN, Captain Charles Francis. Born in Dunmurry, he was on the General Army List, in 9 RIR and attached to 127 PoW Company, Labour Corps, RIR. He died in France on the 13.3.18 aged 23 and is buried at Longuenesse (St. Omer) Souvenir Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France, plot 4, for F, grave 67. He was the son of Charles Howard Duffin who died on the 2.9.21 and Ellen Frances Isabella Duffin of “St. Catherine’s,” Craigavad, Co. Down who died on the 25.6.42 aged 80. Also brother of William Howard Duffin who died from gun shot wounds on the 15.2.22 aged 22. All three relatives are buried at Derriaghy Parish Church where Charles Francis’ death is commemorated on the headstone.
243DuganHillLcpl166810ACCSupportLisnatrunk, LisburnBelfastLisnatrunk, LisburnHilden/LisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-12 00:00:0021Bus House Cemetery, Voormezeele, BelgiumDUGAN, Lance corporal Hill. Born and living in Lisnatrunk, Lisburn, Co. Down and also with an address in Lagan Terrace, Hilden, he was employed at Hilden before the war. Enlisting at Belfast he served in B Company 10 ACC (1668) and was KIA in Belgium on the 12.8.17 aged 21 at a time when he was expected home on leave. Buried in Bus House Cemetery, Voormezeele, Belgium, row H, grave 13, there is no headstone inscription. He was the son of Hill and Mary Jane Dugan of 2 Waring Place, Low Road, Lisburn, and 1 Lagan Terrace, Hilden. His cousin Rm. E McConnell from 5 Victoria Crescent, Lisburn was wounded by shrapenel in August? 1917. Treated in hospital in Nottingham, he appears to have survived the war.
244DuganRichard20834DUGAN, Private Richard. Address Belfast. He enlisted at London, served in 7 RIrF (20834) and DoW in France on the 29.4.16. His death is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, France. Dungan, RichardNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
245DunleavyJamesRm254211RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0052Thiepval Memorial, FranceDUNLEAVY, Rifleman James. Born in Blaris, he lived at 20 Antrim Place, Lisburn. An old soldier with 18 years experience and having fought in the Boer War, he re-enlisted at Lisburn and served in D Company 11 RIR (2542). Embarking for France from Bordon in October 1915, he was KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 52. His death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, faces A/B. He was the husband of Agnes Dunleavy of 20 Antrim Place, Lisburn. They had three children.
246DunleavyJamesDUNLEAVY, James. Commemorated on Lisburn War memorial, there is no positive trace so far.
247DunlopCharlesLt1/2?RInFIrishBallylessonFranceParisDOW1914-10-22 00:00:0022Les Gonards Cemetery, Versailles, Yvelines, FranceDUNLOP, Lieutenant Charles. Educated at Friends’ School, Lisburn, though the school records do not show when he entered. His first report dated 23.12.04 records “Conduct very satisfactory. Subsequent comments were “satisfactory”. He left FSL on the 21.7.05 and may subsequently have attended RBAI. He entered Sandhurst and was sent to the front shortly after graduating where he served in the RInF. He DoW in France on the 22.10.14 aged 22 while waiting for an amputation which he did not get. He was very fond of his horse and before he died was most concerned about what had happened to it. He is buried in Les Gonards Cemetery, Versailles, Yvelines, France, plot 1, grave 35 and was the son of Elizabeth Dunlop of Edenderry House, Ballylesson, and the late James Dunlop. Dunlop, CharlesPat Geary/IWM
248DunlopQuintonCpl1895011RIRIrishBelfastLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0019Thiepval Memorial, FranceDUNLOP, Corporal Quinton. Born at Belfast on the 31.10.1896, he lived at Inglewood, Lisburn. Educated at Friends’ School, which he entered on the 6.9.05, his reports between then and his departure in November 1908 were consistently good. A member of Lisnagarvey Hockey Club and Lisburn Cricket Club, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in A Company 11 RIR (18950) rather than applying for a commission which, in the view of the editor of the Standard, he could have had in other battalions. Rather, “he preferred to stick with his pals”. He embarked for France from Bordon Camp as a lance corporal with 11 RIR in October 1915 and was involved in attempts to save Henry Corkin from drowning on the 17.5.16 (see above). He was KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 19. Prior to the attack that morning, he and three others including Lieutenant Waring, had volunteered to go out into no-mans-land on “scouting duty”. Waring was the only one to return alive. In a letter to George Dunlop he explained that his son “was shot at his (Waring’s) side and that death was instantaneous”. Quinton Dunlop, who at the time of his death had been recommended for a commission in 11 RIR, has no known grave. His death is commemorated on Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15A/B. He was the only son of George and Mary Dunlop of Inglewood, Lisburn, Co. Antrim. The report on Dunlop in the Standard is, like many others, full of praise. However, it is unusually long compared to those for others of humble rank and somehow more sincere. Perhaps this is a reflection of the fact that he was, in the words of the writer, “a personal friend of our own”.
249EdensThomas HenryPvt26111IGIrishBallinderryBelfastBelgiumYpresKIA1914-11-01 00:00:00Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumEDENS, Private Thomas Henry. Born in Ballinderry, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 IG (2611). KIA in Belgium on the 1.11.14, his death is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium, panel 11.
250ElliottAlexanderRm135661RIRIrishDrumboBelfastBelfastFranceLensKIA1915-03-10 00:00:00Merville Communal Cemetery, FranceELLIOTT, Rifleman Alexander. Born in Drumbo, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RIR (13566 or 13506). KIA in France on the 10.3.15, he is buried in Merville Communal Cemetery, Nord, France, plot 1, row B, grave 1. He was the husband of Mrs. S. Elliott of 9 Ravensdale Street, Belfast.
251EmersonThomas HenryRm49714RIRIrishH'boroBelfastCulcaveyBelfastBelgiumMessinesDOW1917-06-20 00:00:0023Locre Hospice Cemetery, BelgiumEMERSON, Rifleman Thomas Henry. Born in Hillsborough, Co. Down, he lived at Culcavey, Hillsborough, enlisted at Belfast and served in C Company 14 RIR (YCV) (497). He DoW in Belgium on the 20.6.17 aged 23 and is buried in Locre Hospice Cemetery, Belgium, plot 1, row A, grave 12. The headstone inscription reads, “Peace perfect peace”. He was the son of William and Agnes Emerson of 11 Zetland Street, Belfast.
252ErvinHugh GlassCpl1222RHGCavalry/supportDromaraBelfastDromaraBelgiumYpresKIA1914-10-30 00:00:00Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumERVIN, Corporal of Horse Hugh Glass (Brownlow). Born and living in Dromara, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in the Company of Horse, Royal Horse Guards (The Blues) (1222). KIA in Belgium on the 30.10.14, his death is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium, panel 3. The family headstone outside 2nd Dromara Presbyterian church shows that he was the son of Samuel James Ervin who died on the 20.3.1934 aged 76 and Sarah Jane Ervin who died on the 8.9.1937 aged 78. They would have been in their mid fifties at the time of their son’s death.
253EvansRobert SPvt71586NIHIrishDunmurryHomeDerriaghyDied1918-11-09 00:00:0027Derriaghy Parish Church GraveyardEVANS, Private Robert S. He served in NIH (71586) and died on the 9.11.18 aged 27. He was the son of Thomas Evans of Suffolk, Dunmurry, and is buried in Derriaghy Parish Church graveyard in the same grave as his brother Private Thomas Evans, below. There is no headstone inscription.
254EvansThomasPvt17716MGC(I)SupportRIRDunmurryHomeDerriaghyDied1920-03-21 00:00:0023Derriaghy Parish Church GraveyardEVANS, Private Thomas. He served in 138 Company MGC(I) (17716) and died on the 21.3.20 aged 23. Buried in Derriaghy Parish Church graveyard in the same grave as his brother Private R. Evans, above. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of Thomas Evans of Suffolk, Dunmurry.
255EwartCecil Frederick KelsoCpt11RIRIrishLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0028Thiepval Memorial, FranceEWART, Captain Cecil Frederick Kelso. Educated at Winchester, he was a member of Lisburn Cricket Club and commander of I Company of the 1st. Lisburn battalion UVF whom he supplied with rifles and ammunition and allowed to practice on his own private shooting range. Enlisting in the New Army at the outbreak of war as did his two brothers, he was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the RIR on the 1.2.15. He embarked for France from Bordon Camp, as a 2nd Lieutenant in A Company 11 RIR, in October 1915 and was promoted to Captain early in 1916. As second in command of C Company he took command on the 1.7.16 when Captain Samuels was wounded. Originally reported wounded and missing he was later confirmed as KIA near Thiepval Wood on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 28. His orderly, James Andrews, (see above), was killed the same day. Captain Ewart was the second son of Maryanne Ewart and Frederick William Ewart of Derryvolgie, Lisburn. His father ran the firm of William Ewart and Son Ltd., Bedford Street, Belfast. His death is commemorated on Thiepval memorial, France Pier 15 Face A/B and on a plaque in Christchurch, Lisburn. His brothers, Major Gerald V. Ewart RASC and Major William Basil Ewart 15 RIR both survived the war although William (below), who was invalided out of the army in 1917, died in February 1920 as a result of “an illness contracted on war service”. His elder brother Gerald received the O.B.E. in the King’s birthday honours in 1919. Ewart, CecilFrederickKelsoILC&LM
256EwartWilliam BasilMaj15RIRIrishDerrivolgie, LisburnDerrivolgie, LisburnHomeDerrivolgie, LisburnDied/nephritis1920-02-13 00:00:0029Clifton Street Burial Ground, BelfastEWART, Major William Basil (Willie). Born on the 25 September 1890 he lived at Derryvolgie, Lisburn and was educated at Malvern College where he was a member of the Public Schools Corps. He entered his father’s Crumlin Road Mill in 1907 and, with the exception of a year spent at James Mackey’s in Belfast to “gain experience on the working of textile machinery”, he was employed there until shortly after the start of the war. During this time his involvement in the flax trade led him to travel widely on the continent including Russia.

An active Unionist, he was commander of the 1st Battalion of the North Belfast Regiment of the UVF with whom he enlisted in the Ulster Division in September 1914 being granted a commission in 15 RIR at Ballykinlar around the time of his 24th birthday. He arrived in France a year later on the 5 October 1915 and was subsequently involved in the opening attack on the Somme in which his elder brother Cecil (above) was killed. Later mentioned in dispatches, he came home on leave in January 1917, landing at Folkestone on the 21st. Shortly after, “it was found that he was suffering from a serious illness” which he had, “contracted while on active service”. Just before he was due to return to his battalion on the 31st, he had visited Dr. H.L.M. Kisack (or H.L. M’Kisack) of 88 University Road, Belfast returning for a second consultation on the 31st. Kisack wrote back immediately to report on the findings of the tests he had carried out. They were not encouraging. “[I] suspect you have what is technically known as “sub-acute nephritis” which is a very serious complaint while it lasts, and if not attended to may cause permanent ill-health and shortened life. I tell you this so you may understand why I must say that I advise you to have this seen to at once and not to travel to France tomorrow – you should go to bed and have perfect rest and warmth”. Emphasising the potential seriousness of the situation, Kisack went on, “I think you ought to tell your parents exactly what I have said to you”.

Placed on the sick list on the 1 February, he was due to attend an Army Medical Board at Victoria Barracks, Belfast on the 13th but this had to be postponed. Writing to the military authorities his doctor, H.S. Murphy of 45 Castle Street, Lisburn, advising them that WBE was suffering from acute nephritis and that “in my opinion it would be very dangerous for him to leave his bed”. When the Board did meet on the 19th it confirmed the diagnosis, concluding that this was due to “exposure and strain” caused by military service. While the acute symptoms had subsided, he was not considered fit for any form of service either at home or overseas and was confined to bed.

Two months later things were little different. A second Medical Board meeting in Belfast on the 14 April reported that “he is pale, anaemic and debilitated” and was still not fit for military service. As a result, he was ordered into the UVF Officers Hospital, Belfast the following Monday, the 16 April, where “a bed is being reserved for you.” Nearly three months later he was still there. On the 6 July he wrote to the War Office from the Military Hospital for Officers, 60 Botanic Avenue, Belfast applying for an illness gratuity on the grounds that he had been, “invalided from the British Expeditionary Force, France since 29th January last suffering from severe Trench Nephritis and although 23 weeks have now elapsed I am still in bed and am unlikely to be able to leave it for some considerable time”.

Another Medical Board held in Belfast on the 22 July reported that he was still suffering from nephritis resulting from severe kidney disease due specifically to, “exposure in [the] trenches” and that it is unlikely he would ever recover although, in their view, he did not requiring “indoor hospital treatment” or to be confined to a convalescent hospital. On the 8 August the War Office wrote to inform him that because he had been found permanently unfit for service, he would have to give up his commission which he formally relinquished on the 21st.

Not all was bleak though. On the 31 July 1917 Willie Ewart married Rebe Annette Grindle, eldest daughter of the late George Annesley Grindle and Mrs. Grindle of Winkton, Christchurch, Hampshire and granddaughter of the late Mr. A.M. Ferrar D.L. of Belfast. He subsequently traveled to “various places for the benefit of his health” and a year later was staying at the Poeteney [Pulteney?] Hotel in Bath where he was being treated privately. A Medical Board held at the War Hospital there on the 10 July 1918 report that, “he has improved but albumin is still present and he is dyspuceic on slight exertion and has morning headaches and slight oedema of [the] eyelids.” In their view his disability, which they assessed as 100%, was permanent and, not surprisingly, he was still unfit for general or home service. With WBE back at Derryvolgie in December, another Medical Board which sat at Belfast on the 6th report that he “is making good progress” and that “all symptoms [were] lessening”. The degree of his disability was now assessed at 50% and was not now considered to be permanent. With things seeming to be on the mend, the winter was spent in the South of Spain.

He continued to be treated privately but the improvement in his health did not last. Another Medical Board in Belfast which sat on the 15 May 1919 concluded that his, “condition [was] not as good as when last Boarded on the 6 December 1918. He is quite unfit for any active or mental occupation and could not undertake the duties of any responsible business or profession at present. [He] was obliged to spend the last winter in a warm climate (Spain) and it is chiefly owing to this that his condition is as good as it is.” The degree of disability was assessed to be back at 100% although it was still not considered permanent.

That July (1919) his son was born, however, in October, his health deteriorated again and he returned to Bath to be admitted to a nursing home at 7 Lansdown Crescent on the 3 November. The next Medical Board he attended was held at Bristol, Regional H.Q on the 28 November 1919. “A well developed man of 29” it began. “Complains of headaches, occasional sickness and breathlessness. He is under the care of Dr. E.J. Cave of Bath who is treating him at the Grand Pump Room Baths, and he thinks he is improving in health slightly”. Certainly he was not in need of further medical or surgical treatment or “the constant attendance of another person”, and by the 24th with his weight up to 12st. 3½lbs, he had put on nearly half a stone in the three weeks since his admission. However, it is possible that this was the result of water retention caused by his nephritis rather than any improvement in his health.

Willie Ewart returned home from Bath in the middle of December. Five weeks later Dr. Kisack’s prophetic warning given back in January 1917 that he had a condition which, “may cause permanent ill-health and shortened life” was proved correct. With his father in attendance, he died at Derryvolgie of “chronic Nephritis … [and] cardiac failure” on the 13 February 1920 aged 29. The bottom line was that in the early 20th century, medical knowledge and understanding were not sufficiently advanced to successfully treat such a disease in its chronic form.

He was buried on Monday the 16 February 1920 in the family burial ground at Clifton Street, Belfast following a service at the Cathedral in Donegall Street. The son of Maryanne Ewart and Frederick William Ewart of Derryvolgie, Lisburn, his father ran the firm of William Ewart and Son Ltd., Bedford Street, Belfast. His eldest brother Major Gerald Valentine Ewart RASC survived the war and received the O.B.E. in the King’s birthday honours in 1919. He and Wiclif McCready were the executors of his will in which he left the proceeds of his estate, valued at £5380.10.4, to his wife Rebe Annette Ewart during her life time and then to his son. Unfortunately for them on the 26 May the Inland Revenue wrote to inform them that “the Army Council are unable to recommend the remission of death duties as the provision of Section 14 of the Finance Act 1900 are not wholly fulfilled.”
Ewart, WilliamBasilNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
257FarrJamesPvt35 DivUS armyAmericanGlenavyAmericaIowa, Washington CountyGlenavy/IowaFranceOther/Meuse-ArgonneKIA1918-09-28 00:00:0027Glenavy War MemorialFARR, Private James. Born in Glenavy, possibly on the 24 March between 1890 and 1893 he was a farmer by occupation. Single, literate and in good physical health, he emigrated to the United States in 1909 three years after his father’s death. Aged 19, he sailed from Liverpool as a steerage passenger on the SS Celtic on the 26 February, arriving in New York on 8 March. 5’ 9” tall he had a fair complexion, fair hair and blue? eyes. He had never been in the US before, had £4 in his pocket and a ticket for Iowa which had been paid for by his uncle (probably his mother’s brother) Thomas Clendinning of Swea City in the state. Becoming a resident of Washington County in Iowa, it was almost exactly nine years to the day after arriving in New York that he enlisted in the American Army on the 23 February 1918. Going first to Camp Dodge where he was placed in the Infantry, he was subsequently transferred to the 35th Division and went overseas in April 1918. He died of wounds received in action on the 28 September 1918 while involved in the Meuse-Argonne offensive. He was probably 27 years old. The son of James Farr who taught in Fourscore N[ational] S[chool] for 38 years and died on the 10.7.06 aged 60, and Ellen Farr nee Clendenning who died on the 30.9.33 aged 70 years, his place of burial or official commemoration are unknown. However, his death is commemorated on his parent’s headstone in St. Aidan’s Parish Church graveyard, Glenavy and on the village war memorial.
258FaulknerJohnRm1762613RIRIrishBelfastLisburnAughnatrisk, H'boro/BelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceFAULKNER, Rifleman John. Born in Belfast, with an address in Aghnathrisk, Hillsborough, Co. Down and Belfast, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 13 RIR (17626). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France pier 15, faces A/B.
259FeighanMichael JamesPvt73523MGC(I)SupportRIrF 5863LanarkshireNewryDunmurryBessbrook/ScotlandBelgiumPoperingheDOW1917-08-22 00:00:0024Mendinghem Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, BelgiumFEIGHAN, Private Michael James. Born in Coatbridge, Lanark, he lived in Dunmurry, enlisted at Newry and served in the RIrF (5863) before being transferred to 49 Company MGC(I) (73523). He DoW in Belgium on the 22.8.17 age 24 and is buried in Mendinghem Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, Belgium, plot 4, row F, grave 29. He was the son of William and Mary Ann Feighan of Scotland and husband of Rose Feighan of 48 Frederick Street, Bessbrook, Co. Armagh.
260FenningRichardPvt78432587CEF QR CGGImperialLisburnFranceArrasKIA1917-08-14 00:00:0025Vimy Memorial, FranceFENNING, Private Richard. Served in the Canadian Grenadier Guards 87 QR CEF (784325). KIA in France on the 14.8.17 aged 25, his death is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial, France. He was the eldest son of Thomas Fenning of Whitemountain, Lisburn, Co. Antrim, and brother of James Fenning, above.
261FenningJamesRm634112RIRIrishDerriaghyLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1918-04-11 00:00:0022Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumFENNING, Rifleman James. Born in Derriaghy, he enlisted at Lisburn, and served in 12 RIR (6341). KIA in Belgium on the 11.4.18 aged 22, his death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium, panels 138-140. He was the son of Thomas Fenning of Whitemountain, Lisburn, Co. Antrim, and younger brother of Richard Fenning, below.
262FentonJohnRm1763011RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1916-09-01 00:00:00Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumFENTON, Rifleman John. Born in Lisburn he lived at 9 Grove Place, Low Road in the town. He belonged to the Orange Order and UVF, and worked at Hilden Mill. Enlisting at Lisburn he served in 11 RIR (17630) and embarked with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. KIA in Belgium on the 1.9.16, his death is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Belgium, panel 40. Mrs. Fenton, his wife, lived at Grove Place, Lisburn and the couples neighbours, William Lindsay and family at number 11, inserted a notice in the Standard on the 22 September 1916, “Deeply regretting” John Fenton’s death.
263Fenton (Coburn)Frederick John (William)Pvt5149115RSFScottishSRH'boroBelfastH'boroH'boroBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1918-04-16 00:00:0019Ploegsteert Memorial, BelgiumFENTON, Private Frederick John. Served as Coburn, William. Born and living in Hillsborough, he enlisted at Belfast and served originally in the SR 36271 subsequently transferring to 15 RS (51491). KIA in Belgium on the 16.4.18 aged 19, his death is commemorated on the Ploegsteert, Memorial, Belgium, panel 1. He was the foster son of Clara McBride of Arthur Street, Hillsborough, Co. Down.
264FergusonJohn BPvt7180527CEF MtbRImperialLisbanWinnipegLisbanFranceSommeKIA1916-09-15 00:00:0026Courcelette British Cemetery, FranceFERGUSON, Private John B. Is commemorated on the War Memorial in First Boardmills Presbyterian Church. No positive trace so far.
265FerrisSamuelRm91532RIRIrishLisburnBelfastBelfastBelgiumYpresKIA1914-11-11 00:00:0040Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumFERRIS, Rifleman Samuel. Born in Lisburn, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 2 RIR (9153). KIA in Belgium on the 11.11.14 aged 40, his death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate, Memorial, Belgium. He was the husband of Catherine Ferris of 914 Crumlin Road, Ballysillan, Belfast.
266FerrisJosephPvt100451IGIrishLisburnBelfastLisburnFranceCambraiDOW1917-12-02 00:00:0027Tincourt New British Cemetery, FranceFERRIS, Private Joseph (Joe). Born in Lisburn, prior to the war he was a vanman for the Lisburn Co-operative Society. He enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 IG (10045). Wounded while in a working party on a railway line, he DoW some days later in France on the 2.12.17 aged 27 and is buried in Tincourt New British Cemetery, France, plot 3, row F, grave 11. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of John and Annie Ferris of 36 Grove Street, Low Road, Lisburn.
267FinneganRobert ThomasPvtM2/274193110 FARAMCSupportRASCShankillBelfastBelfastFranceSommeDied1918-03-21 00:00:0019Pozieres Memorial, FranceFINNEGAN, Private Robert Thomas. Born in Shankill, he lived and enlisted at Belfast, served in the RASC (M2/274193) and was attached to the 110 Field Ambulance, RAMC. He DoW in German hands at Grand Seracourt on the Somme on the 21.3.18 age 19 and is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, France, panel 95. He was the son of John Maxwell Finnegan and Susan Wilson Finnegan. In June 1920, his mother unveiled the War Memorial in Boardmills Second Presbyterian Church on which his death is also commemorated. At the service the Rev. Robert Kelso explained the circumstances in which he had died. “Mortally wounded at Grand Seracourt, he … could have saved himself … had he retired without his wounded, but that Robert Finnegan would not do, and little further was known beyond the fact that he died after capture”. His name was included on the memorial at Boardmills “on account of his long association with their manse”, where his maternal grandfather had been a pastor. Finnegan, RobertThomasPat Geary/De Ruvignys
268FitzsimonsJamesRm53672RIRIrishLambegLisburnBelfastBelfast/LisburnBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1916-12-12 00:00:0031Hyde Park Corner Cemetery, Ploegsteert, BelgiumFITZSIMONS, Rifleman James. Born in Lambeg, Co. Antrim, he lived in Belfast, enlisted at Lisburn and served in C Company 2 RIR (5367). KIA in Belgium on the 12.12.16 aged 31, he is buried in Hyde Park Corner Cemetery, Belgium, row A, grave 13. The headstone inscription reads, “On his soul Jesus have mercy. Remembered by his wife and little daughter”. He was the husband of Catherine Fitzsimmons of 22 Shore Street, Belfast and son of James and Mary Anne Fitzsimons, nee Hilden, of Lisburn.
269FitzsimonsJohnLcpl58097RIRIrishBlarisBelfastCraigavadCraigavadFranceBelgian borderDOW1917-02-25 00:00:0019Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceFITZSIMONS, Lance corporal John. Born in Blaris, he lived at Craigavad Post Office, Co. Down, enlisted at Belfast and served in 7 RIR (5809). He DoW in France (possibly wounded in Belgium) on the 25.2.17 aged 19 and is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, France, (close to the Franco-Belgium frontier) plot 3, row A, grave 14. The headstone inscription reads, “Not gone from memory or from love”. He was the son of Martin and Susan Fitzsimmons of Dalchoolin, Craigavad, Co. Down.
270FlanaganJosephLcpl156738RDFIrishTullylushLisburnBessbrookFranceSommeKIA1916-09-09 00:00:00Guards' Cemetery, Lesboeufs, FranceFLANAGAN, Lance corporal Joseph. Born in Tullylush, Co. Down, he lived at Bessbrook, Co. Armagh, enlisted at Lisburn and served in 8 RDF (15673). KIA on the Somme on the 9.9.16, he is buried in the Guards Cemetery, Lesboeufs, France, plot 11, row N, grave 7. There is no headstone inscription.
271FlanaganHughLcpl412299RIrFIrishNIH 1508BallymenaAntrimBelfastBelfastFranceCambraiKIA1917-11-22 00:00:0021Cambrai Memorial, Louverval Military Cemetery, FranceFLANAGAN, Lance Corporal Hugh. Born in Ballymena, he lived in Belfast, enlisted at Antrim and served in NIH (1508) before transferring to 9 RIrF (41229). KIA in France on the 22.11.17 age 21, his death is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, Nord, France, panel 10. He was the son of Robert Henry and Martha Flanagan of 129 Dunluce Avenue, Belfast and brother of William Flanagan, below.
272FlanaganWilliam Henry MurrayRm1031012RIRIrish11 RIR?BelfastBelfastBelgiumYpresKIA1918-04-13 00:00:0023Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumFLANAGAN,  Rifleman William Henry Murray. Enlisted at Belfast possibly in 11 RIR and served in 12 RIR (10310). He may have embarked for France from Bordon Camp with 11 RIR in October 1915. KIA in Belgium on the 13.4.18 age 23, his death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Zonnebeke, Belgium, panels 138 to 140 and 162 to 162A and 163A. He was the son of Robert Henry and Martha Flanagan of 129 Dunluce Avenue, Belfast and brother of Hugh Flanagan, above.
273FlemingJamesPvt11RIRIrishAughnahoughKIAFLEMING  Private James. He lived at Aughnahough (just outside Lisburn on the Glenavy Road), served in 11 RIR and embarked with them for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. He was subsequently KIA but there is no further trace so far.
274FlemingRichardCplCEF CGGImperialAughnahoughKIAFLEMING, Corporal Richard. He lived at Aughnahough (just outside Lisburn on the Glenavy Road), served in the Canadian Grenadier Guards and was KIA. There is no further trace so far. Fleming, RichardILC&LM
275FlemmingJohnLcpl1949011RIRIrishCrumlinAntrimCrumlinCrumlinFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0026Thiepval Memorial, FranceFLEMMING, Lance Corporal John. Born and living in Crumlin, he was a member of the Orange Order in Glenavy. He enlisted at Antrim and served in D Company 11 RIR (19490) embarking with them for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Listed as missing and subsequently KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 26, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France pier and face 15 A and B. He was the son of James Fleming of Main Street, Crumlin, and the late Mary Fleming.
276FletcherRRm60497RIRIrishBlarisHomeLisburnDied1920-10-24 00:00:00Blaris Old Cemetery, LisburnFLETCHER, Rifleman R. Served in 7 RIR (6049) and died at “home” on the 24.10.20. He is buried in Blaris Old Cemetery, Lisburn, grave 374 and was the son of Robert Fletcher of Blaris.
277FloydCharlesPvt113676RInFIrishShankillBelfastTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-08-16 00:00:00Helles Memorial, GallipoliFLOYD, Private Charles. Born in Shankill, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 6 RInF (11367). KIA in Gallipoli on the 16.8.15, his death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panels 97-101. Floyd, CharlesNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
278FlynnG.E.RIRIrishFLYNN, G.E. Served in the RIR. His death is commemorated on the War memorial in Lisburn Cathedral. There is no positive trace so far.
279ForsytheJohnPvt78372RDFIrishCastlewellanBelfastLambegBelgiumYpresKIA1915-04-26 00:00:00Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumFORSYTHE, Private John. Born in Castlewellan, Co. Down, he lived at Lambeg, enlisted at Belfast and served in 2 RDF (7837). KIA in Belgium on the 26.4.15, his death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate, Memorial, Belgium, panels 44-46.
280ForsytheJohn AlexanderRm177010RIRIrishDromaraBelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceFORSYTHE, Rifleman John Alexander. Born in Dromara, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 10 RIR (1770). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A and B.
281FraserEbenezerPvt30471RIrFIrishH'boroCavanBelturbetFranceBelgian borderDOW1915-05-22 00:00:00Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceFRASER, Private Ebenezer. Born in Hillsborough, he lived at Belturbet, Co. Cavan, enlisted at Cavan and served in 1 RIrF (3047). He DoW in France on the 22.5.15 and is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, (close to the Franco-Belgium frontier) plot 1, row A, grave 40. There is no headstone inscription.
282FrazerWilliam JohnLcpl45791RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1917-07-07 00:00:00Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumFRAZER, Lance corporal William John. Born in Lisburn where he lived at Chapel Hill, he was a reservist, enlisted in the town and served in C Company 1 RIR (4579). Wounded in July 1916 he was KIA at Ypres in Belgium on the 7.7.17 and his death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate, Memorial, Panels 138-140. Son of Robert and Sarah Frazer of 72 Chapel Hill, Lisburn, and husband of Lizzie Frazer of 67 Longstone Street, Lisburn, they had four young children. She was informed by one of his comrades that, “he had been given a Christian burial”. Lizzie Frazer inserted the following poem in the Herald on the 28 July 1917 along with her husband’s death notice. “No more we’ll clasp they loving hand, Nor hear the voice now stilled, Till we reach the land where you’ll proudly stand, Midst earth’s heroes in action killed”. The following week a much longer poem placed by J.R. Mulholland, a friend of Bob Frazer appeared, dedicated “to the memory of William Frazer, late of Longstone, Fell in Action, July 7th 1917. In the ‘Herald’ I read of another gone home, That once played by the Lagan and the fields round Longstone; I chummed with his father, we played there as boys, We then knew no sorrow, but shared other joys. We grew up to manhood, in the same Lodge we sat, Those bright days spent together, I shall never forget; We seldom were sundered, till Bob Frazer got wed, Then he settled in peace, and I found breakers ahead. And now in his sorrow, as I shared in his joy, I sympathise with him in the loss of his boy; And though gone forever, he is not gone alone, But joins many a comrade raised in Longstone. We know they are fallen, we can’t stifle the sigh, With young hopes they left us, yet they knew how to die; We are not there beside them, to stand by the bier, But brave hands will tend them, kind hearts force the tear. There are few homes in Lisburn where the eyes are all dry, And the heart of the scoffer, be it flint, can’t deny, They went forth in young manhood, left the loved ones behind, To fight for the Homeland, or a grave for to find. They are just gone before us, we have all got to go, And how few there are of us but would like to die so, With a heart filled with freedom, as its last breath it draws, And sheds its last life-drop in so Holy a cause”. This was followed on the 11 August by a death notice inserted by “his sorrowing chum, Rifleman James Kennedy (5231) 1st Batt. Royal Irish Rifles (on active service)”. It read, “Better love hath no man than this to lay down his life for his friends”. James Kennedy appears to have survived the war.
283FryerEdwardRm146279RIRIrishLisburnBelfastBelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0022Thiepval Memorial, FranceFRYER, Rifleman Edward. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in B Company 9 RIR (14627). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 22, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A/B. He was the son of Robert, a flaxdresser, and Sarah Fryer of 8 Tenth Street, Belfast.
284FultonThomasRm8/61728RIRIrishKinallen, DromaraBelfastDromoreKinallen, DromaraBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1916-08-04 00:00:0024Ration Farm, La Plus Douve Cemetery Annex, Ploegsteert, BelgiumFULTON, Rifleman, Thomas. Born in Kinallen, Co. Down, he lived at Dromore, Co. Down, enlisted at Belfast and served in 8 RIR (8/6172). KIA in Belgium on the 4.8.16 age 24, he is buried in Ration Farm (La Plus Douve) Annexe, Heuvelland, Belgium, plot 3, row B, grave 4. He was the son of John Fulton of Kinallen, Dromara, Co. Down.
285FurfeyPatrickPvt104962RInFIrishLurganBelfastLisburnBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1914-10-27 00:00:00Ploegsteert Memorial, BelgiumFURFEY, Private Patrick. Born in Lurgan, he lived on the Old Hillsborough Road, Lisburn. A well known cross country runner, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 2 RInF (10496), representing his regiment in the Eastern Command, South of Thames Cross-country Championship. KIA at Ypres, Belgium on the 27.10.14, his death is commemorated on Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium, panel 9. His nok appears to have been his sister. Furfey, PatrickILC&LM
286GarveyThomasDvrT4/045364RASCSupport7 LR 1570LisburnBelfastBelfastHomeHampshireDied1915-10-04 00:00:00Netley Military Cemetery, Hound, HampshireGARVEY, Driver Thomas. Born in Lisburn, he lived and enlisted at Belfast and served in 7 LR (1579) before being transferred to 51st. Field Bakery RASC (T4/045364). He died at “home” on the 4.10.15 and is buried in Netley Military Cemetery, Hants, grave 858.
287GawAdamSgt1385793CEF CORImperialLancashireTorontoTorontoFranceArrasKIA1918-09-02 00:00:0021Vimy memorial, FranceGAW, Sergeant Adam. MM and bar. Born in Lancashire on the 1 May 1897, “he was a member of a Lambeg which emigrated to Canada some years ago.” A steamfitter by trade and a single man, he enlisted at Toronto on the 15 July 1915 aged 18 years and 4 months. Although he was a member of the Militia, he had no previous military experience. 5’ 7¼” tall, he had a 37” chest with 4” range of expansion, fair complexion, blue eyes and light brown hair. Posted to 3 COR, C.I. (138579), according to the Standard he won the MM when he was still 19 and was promoted to Sergeant in the field. KIA on the 2.9.18 aged 21, his death is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial, France. He was the son of John and Susan Gaw of 55 Welland Avenue, Moore Park, Toronto. Three brothers also served in the Canadian Army. James who was born in Belfast in 1889, Thomas in Lancashire in 1893 and William, also in Lancashire the following year.
288GawleyPatrickPvt39426CRIrishBallinderryBelfastBelfastBelgiumYpresKIA1917-06-04 00:00:00Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumGAWLEY, Private Patrick. Born in Ballinderry, Co. Antrim, he lived and enlisted at Belfast and served in 6 CR (3942). KIA in Belgium on the 4.6.17, his death is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium, panel 42.
289GeorgeJamesPvt69402CRIrishBelfastGlasgowBelfastHillsboroughFranceRearDOW1914-10-29 00:00:0038Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, FranceGEORGE, Private James. Born and living in Belfast, he enlisted at Glasgow and served in 2 CR (6940). He DoW on the 29.10.14 age 38 and is buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, Pas De Calais, France, plot 3, row B, grave 4. He was the husband of Mary George of Tullynore, Hillsborough, Co. Down.
290GibsonJohn AlexanderRm18/4529RIRIrish18 RIRBelfastLisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumMessinesKIA1917-04-06 00:00:0019Pond Farm Cemetery, Wulverghem, BelgiumGIBSON, Signaler/Private John Alexander. Born Shankill, Belfast, he lived at 49 Sloan Street, Lisburn and was employed at William Barbours of Hilden. He enlisted at Lisburn and served in 9 RIR (18/452). KIA “instantaneously” according to the death notice inserted in the Standard on the 4 May, in Belgium on the 6.4.17 aged 19, he was buried in Pond Farm Cemetery, Wulverghem, Belgium, row L, grave 5. He was the eldest son of Alexander (Alex) and Jane Gibson of 49 Sloan Street, Lisburn and later of 37 Agincourt Street, Belfast. The death notice in the Standard inserted by his parents included the following poem, “The news was sad, the blow was hard, God’s will, it shall be done; With a manly heart he did his part, Our dear, beloved son”.
291GibsonJamesLcpl124996.7RSFScottishH'boroAyrNorthamptonH'boro/LeominsterBelgiumYpresDied1917-08-01 00:00:0032Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumGIBSON, Lance corporal James. Born in Hillsborough, he lived at Northampton, enlisted at Ayr and served in 6/7 RSF (12499). He died in Belgium on the 1.8.17 aged 32 and is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate Memorial, Belgium, panels 19 and 33. He was the son of Thomas and Annie Gibson of The Park, Hillsborough, Co. Down and husband of Naomi Gibson, The Villas, Dilwyn, Leominster, Herefordshire.
292GibsonWilliam JohnSgt88461RIRIrishH'boroLisburnBelfastBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1918-09-07 00:00:0024Ploegsteert Memorial, BelgiumGIBSON, Sergeant William John. Born in Hillsborough, Co. Down, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 1 RIR (8846). KIA in Belgium on the 7.9.18 aged 24, his death is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium, panel 9. He was the son of William John and Harriett Gibson of 49 Donegall Avenue, Belfast.
293GibsonThomasPvt2RIrF/RInF?IrishBallylessonKIAGIBSON, Private Thomas. Served in 2 RIrF or 2 RInF he lived at Ballylesson. KIA, possibly in Salonica, there is no further trace so far.
294GillHenry Albert GeorgePvt59815AEFImperialBelfastBrisbaneBrisbaneBelfastTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-08-08 00:00:0029Lone Pine Memorial, GallipoliGILL, Private Henry Albert George (Harry/Albert). Born at 102 Newtownards Road, Belfast, between November 1887 and July 1888, he was the son of Mary Agnes Gill. He attended the Intermediate School, Queens College, Royal _ _ _ _ _ of Ireland and, when he was 24, emigrated to Australia where he had cousins, also called Gill, living at Tamworth, Sydney and Emu Creek, Melbourne. He probably landing at Brisbane in Queensland and subsequently worked as a farm labourer. Certainly, when he enlisted at Brisbane on the 16 September 1914 aged 26 years and 2 or 10 months, he had no previous military experience. 5’ 10½” tall, he weighed 137 lbs. and had a chest measurement of 33 ” to 35½”. His complexion was dark and he had hazel eyes and brown hair. Posted to the 15th. Australian Infantry (598), he embarked at Melbourne on HMAT (His Majesty’s Australian Transport?) “Ceramic” on the 22.12.14. Reported missing from the 8.8.15, a court of enquiry sitting at Serapoum (in Egypt?) on the 5.5.16 confirmed that he had been KIA in Gallipoli on the 8.8.15 aged 29. His death is commemorated on the Lone Pine Memorial, Gallipoli, panel 46.

In his will Albert Gill left, “the whole of my property and effects and all my money to my mother … [and] in case of my mother’s death to my sister Eva”. There was not much to leave. The single packet of belongings eventually returned to his mother included, a New Testament, match box, rubber stamp, 3 bracelets, 1 anklet, a purse, diary, 2 hair brushes, a razor, letters, military book, cards, French Grammar, an English/Arabic manuel, pocket notes and a silk shawl. The Testament though may well have been of particular value. In the biographical details given by his mother to the Australian War Memorial she said, “He was one of the best and one of the few - my liberal minded large hearted son. Without delay he went at the call of duty. His letters from the Dardanelles were always cheerful. The last letter we received from him was dated 30th. July 1915 then he was reported missing from 8th. August and in November we received a letter from a pioneer Sergt of the London Regiment who wrote that he had found my son and buried him and that he seemed to have had an easy death. He was lying on his side and in his outstretched hand he had a copy of the New Testament. The book was officially forwarded to me, it was the Book we had sent my son with his name and home address written therein, the mark of his thumb is on the mouldering cover of the book. This is all that has come to me from [his] death.” A covering letter sent by Gill’s sister Eva from 102 Newtownards Road, Belfast on the 3rd. March 1920 to the authorities in Australia reads, “herewith I return you the form for Roll of Honour and for the Histories of Australia with the particulars filled in by my mother as requested about our beloved Albert. This is all we know as yet, and if later we learn of any other details that might be of interest to you we will send you. We still are _ _ _ _ for news of him - his _ _ _ _ _ stood, a big warm loving shelter[?] for us all. His life _ _ _ _ _ and in Australia was a daily self-sacrifice for us the light and joy of our old home went with our Albert - our best[?] _ _ _ _ _ We send you his photo _ _ _ _ _ and hope it may be possible for it to be inserted, and if you will please let us know that you receive them safely. My mother is out at our home in the country at present with my youngest _ _ _ _ _ who is an invalid now. Thank you for your kind remembrance, Yours sincerely G.E.M[?] Gill (Eva)”. In 1916 Mary Gill was awarded a pension of £2 per fortnight.
Gill, HenryAlbertNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
295GillWilliamRm300611RIRIrishDromoreLisburnBallyskeagh,LambegBallyskeagh,LambegBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1916-08-09 00:00:00Ration Farm, La Plus Douve Cemetery Annex, Ploegsteert, BelgiumGILL, Rifleman William. Born in Dromore, he lived at Ballyskeagh, Lambeg, where, before the war, he had been a damask weaver. Enlisting at Lisburn, he served in 11 RIR (3006) and embarked with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. KIA in Belgium on the 9.8.16, the Rev. J.G. Paton a Presbyterian chaplain wrote to his wife informing her that he, “was killed by a trench mortar bomb which burst close beside him and that death was instantaneous. I conducted a burial service yesterday [and] he is buried in a perfect little cemetery on the hillside. As you know he did his duty well in the big battle of the 1st July, and he always bore himself as a soldier and a man, earning the goodwill of all who knew him. He has now made the great sacrifice, and you have every reason to be proud of him”. William Gill is buried in Ration Farm Cemetery Annex, Belgium, plot 3, row B, grave 5. The husband of Mrs. Gill of Ballyskeagh, they had five young children, and the son of Joseph and Mrs. E. Gill also of Ballyskeagh. In addition, he had three brothers all living at Ballyskeagh and all serving as Riflemen in the RIR. They too had enlisted at the start of the war, David and Robert (along with William) in the 11th battalion (South Antrim Volunteers), and they embarked with him for France from Bordon in October 1915. James served in the “regulars”. David, who had been promoted to Lance Corporal in B Company, and James, were both wounded on the 1.7.16. Robert was also involved in the fighting that day but was unhurt. All three appear to have survived the war.
296GillespieWilliam JohnStkSS/107919HMS HawkeRNNavyDunmurryAt seaNorth SeaKIA/drowned1914-10-15 00:00:0030Chatham Naval Memorial, KentGILLESPIE, Stoker 1st. Class William John. He served in the Royal Navy on HMS Hawke (SS/107919. RFR/CH/B/10369) and was KIA in an engagement with a submarine in the North Sea on the 15.10.14 age 30. His death is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent, panel 5. He was the son of William and Maria Gillespie of Dunmurry, Co. Antrim. The Hawke an old cruiser was torpedoed with the loss of all but 21 of her crew. Stoker Edward Crossin (above) was killed in the same action. The sinking of the Hawke, and a month earlier the Cressy (on which Joshua Singleton died), the Hogue and Aboukir by the German submarine U9 (or U29), convinced both sides that the submarine was a potent weapon. In March 1915 the Standard carried an article in which it was reported that, “The Aboukir, Cressy and Hogue have been avenged. The submarine U29, which sank these boats, has been sent to the bottom with all hands … This cheerful news has been published by the Admiralty, and may be taken as a fact, though the Admiralty, always careful in their choice of language, only state, ‘they have good reason to believe’ that the German submarine U29 has been sunk”.
297GillespieVictor AllenPvt487408CEF PPCLI EORImperialMonaghanMontrealCanada?H'boro/SligoFranceArrasDOW1917-10-01 00:00:0027Aubigny Communal Cemetery, FranceGILLESPIE, Private Victor Allan. Born in Monaghan, Co. Monaghan on the 3.8.1890 he was a single man and a bank clerk by profession who enlisted at Montreal on the 14.12.1915. 5’ 7½” tall, his chest was 37½” fully expanded with a range of expansion of 3½”. He had a dark complexion with blue eyes and brown hair, dark hair on his chest, abdomen and legs, a scar from an operation for appendicitis and a burn mark on the left hand side of his neck. At the time of enlistment he was in the 35th. Al[ber]ta Light Horse. Posted to the 5th. Overseas Universities Company CEF, he served with PPCLI, EOR, CEF (487408). He DoW received in action in France on the 1.10.17 aged 27 and is buried in Aubigny Communal Cemetery Extension, France, plot 3, row F, grave 16. He was the son of the late Joseph and Mary Gillespie of Ballycrune, Hillsborough, subsequently of Sligo, and brother of Frederick Gillespie, above.
298GillespieMauricePvt24928258CEF CORImperialBanbridgeTorontoTorontoBanbridge/DublinFranceRearDOW1918-10-13 00:00:0029Etaples Military Cemetery, FranceGILLESPIE, Private Maurice. Born in Banbridge on the 29.12.1888, he was an old scholar of Friends’ School, Lisburn which he entered in September 1904. His report at the start noted that “he was not used to strict discipline” but comments subsequently improved. He left FSL on the 22.12.05. A single man and a teamster, his address was 25 Magill Street, Toronto, Canada. He enlisted on the 6.4.1916 and at the time was in the 10th. G?ons (the militia) in which he had served for two years. 5’ 8½” tall, his chest was 37” fully expanded with a range of expansion of 2½”. He had a fair complexion with blue eyes and brown hair. He served in B Company 58 Canadian Infantry, 2 COR, (249282) and DoW received in action near Cambrai on the 13.10.18 aged 29. He is buried in Etaples Military Cemetery, France, plot 67, row J?, grave 22. His headstone inscription reads, “To the dear memory of my darling son, safe in God’s keeping, Mother”. He was the only son of Kathleen and the late Thomas Gillespie of Banbridge, Co. Down. Kathleen Gillespie (his mother) also had an address at 36 Garville Avenue, Dublin.
299GillespieRobert Cecil VictorLcpl289917EYREnglishNF 27250LisburnSheffieldLisburnFranceCambraiKIA1918-11-04 00:00:00Romeries Communal Cemetery, FranceGILLESPIE, Lance Corporal Robert Cecil Victor. Born in Lisburn, he lived at Seymour Street in the town, although he was “in business” in Sheffield when the War broke out. He enlisted there and served originally in the NF (27250) before transferring to 7 EYR (28991). KIA in France on the 4.11.18 he is buried in Romeries Communal Cemetery Extension, France, plot 5, row E, grave 9. He was the third son of Mr. W.J. Gillespie of Bow Street, Lisburn who was only informed of his son’s death three days after the Armistice. “It appears that your son along with four others was in a dugout when a shell burst near, killing them all by concussion”, wrote Captain Williamson to his father. “I can assure you of my deepest sympathy …”. Two brothers also saw active service. CQMS John E.S. Gillespie was discharged from the army shortly before his brother’s death as medically unfit for duty. He had served for four years. His eldest brother, Private Charles Gillespie, Royal Marines, H.M.S. Duke of Edinburgh, had been in action during the Battle of Jutland.
300GillespieFrederick JosephSgt86SAEF SAMCImperialH'boro?SligoFranceCambraiDOW1918-11-12 00:00:0037Tincourt New British Cemetery, FranceGILLESPIE, Sergeant Frederick (Fred) Joseph. Probably lived at Ballycrune, Hillsborough, Co. Down and served in the 1st. Field Ambulance, South African Medical Corps, South African Expeditionary Force, (86). He DoW received while on duty in France on the 12.11.18 aged 37 and is buried in Tincourt New British Cemetery, France, plot 6, row D, grave 6. The headstone inscription reads, “Pro aris et focis”. He was the son of the late Joseph and Mary Gillespie, Carney, Co. Sligo and brother of Pvt. Victor Gillespie, below. Gillespie, FrederickJosephPat Geary/De Ruvignys
301GillilandDavidPvt37831RIrFIrish7248 RIRLisburnHollywoodBelfastBelgiumPoperingheDOW1918-04-09 00:00:0036Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, BelgiumGILLILAND, Private David. Born in Lisburn, he lived at Belfast, enlisted at Hollywood and served originally in the RIR (7248) before transferring to 1 RIrF (3783). He DoW in Belgium on the 9.4.18 aged 36 and is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, Belgium, plot 26, row E, grave 16A. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of James and Agnes Gilliland and husband of Margaret Gilliland.
302GloverThomas HDvr5235782 BtyRFASupportBallinderryLisburnBallinderryMiddle EastMesopotamiaKIA1915-09-28 00:00:0027Basra Memorial, IraqGLOVER, Driver Thomas H. Born in Ballinderry, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 82 Battery RFA (52357). KIA in Mesopotamia on the 28.9.15 age 27, his death is commemorated on the Basra Memorial, Iraq, panels 3 and 60. He was the son of Matthew and Mary Glover of Lower Ballinderry, Lisburn. His death is also commemorated on a headstone erected by his nephew Frederick McNeice in Middle Church graveyard, Ballinderry and on the family headstone in Aghalee burial ground.
303GoodfellowJamesLcpl4048427MGCoyCEFImperialBelfastNiagraLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-10-08 00:00:0026Vimy Memorial, FranceGOODFELLOW, Lance Corporal James. Born in Belfast on the 6.12.1889 he was a single man and a clerk by trade when he enlisted at Niagra Camp on the 14.7.15. A member of the malitia but with no previous military experience, he was 5’ 9” tall with a 37” chest fully expanded and a 2” range of expansion, had a medium complexion, blue eyes and dark brown hair. Posted to the 7th Coy. Canadian Machine Gun Corps (404842) he died on the 8.10.16 aged 26. He was the son of Mrs. Louisa Goodfellow of 45 Abingdon Street, Belfast and the late James Goodfellow. His death is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial and on the family headstone in Lisburn Cemetery. James Goodfellow snr. died on the 4.11.1898 aged 43, his widow Louisa on the 9.5.1928 aged 67. His sister Kathleen who would have been17 when he was killed died in 1993 aged 94 and is buried in Lisburn Cemetery along with her parents. Goodfellow, JamesPat Geary/Canadian Virtual WM
304GormanDanielRm302611RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceGORMAN, Rifleman Daniel. Born in Blaris, he lived at 14 Canal Street, in the town, where he was a member of the South Antrim Volunteers, the local UVF battalion. He enlisted soon after the start of the war, serving in D Company 11 RIR (3026), embarking for France from Bordon in October 1915. KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on Thiepval Memorial, France pier 15, faces A/B. He was survived by his father John of 14 Canal Street Lisburn, and by his sister and brother-in-law Isabella and John Totten of Canal Street. His brother-in-law also saw active service.
305GormanGeorgeLcpl1471310RIRIrishLisburnBelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceGORMAN, Lance corporal George. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 10 RIR (14713). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.
306GormanGilbertRm8716RIRIrishDromaraBelfastMoybrick, DromaraDromaraFranceRearDOW1916-08-22 00:00:0037Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, FranceGORMAN, Rifleman Gilbert. Born in Dromara, Co. Down, he lived at Moybrick, (south-west of Dromara), enlisted at Belfast and served in 16 RIR (87). He DoW in France on the 22.8.16 age 37 and is buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France, plot 8, row B, grave 156. He was the son of Gilbert and Margaret Jane Gorman of Moybrick, Dromara, Ballynahinch, Co. Down.
307GormanWilliamPvt1500908CEF MtbaRImperialBangorWinnipegBangorFranceLens/ArrasKIA1917-02-07 00:00:0024Fosse No. 10 Communal Cemetery Extension, Sains-en-Gohelle, FranceGORMAN, Private William (Willie) J. R. Born in Bangor, on the 23.12.1892, he was a single man and a salesman by profession. 5’ 8½” in height with a 36½” chest and 3” expansion, he had dark hair, a dark complexion and grey eyes. With no previous military experience he enlisted at Winnipeg on the 26.7.15 aged 22. Posted to the 79 Overseas Battalion on the 1.9.15, he served in the 8 CI MtbaR (150090). Killed in France on the 7.2.17 aged 24, he is buried in Fosse No. 10 Communal Cemetery Extension, Sains-en-Gohelle, Pas de Calais, France, plot 1, row B, grave 38. Sains-en-Gohelle is a mining village 20 kilometres north of Arras on the road to Bethune. Fosse No. 10 was a pithead and group of miners’ houses south of the village. He was the son of Thomas B. Gorman of 19 Bridge Street, Bangor. He was also the grandson of Philip Gorman who died on the 30.5.07 aged 90, and Anne Jane Gorman who died on the 26.2.1897 on whose headstone in Broomhedge Parish church graveyard his death is commemorated.
308GrahamThomasRm50571RIRIrishShankillLisburnLisburnFranceLensKIA1915-03-11 00:00:0018Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg-l'Avoue, FranceGRAHAM, Rifleman Thomas. Born in Shankill, Belfast, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 1 RIR (5057). KIA in France on the 11.3.15 aged 18, his death is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, France, panels 42 and 43. He was the son of Jane Graham, formerly McGowan of 15 Market Lane, Lisburn and the late Edward Graham. A year and a half later Jane Graham was to lose a second son, Private James McGowan who was KIA on the Somme on the 12.10.16. (See below). This means that she had been widowed twice and lost two sons in the war.
309GrahamJohnSap42227RESupportLisburnBelfastBelfastTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-07-25 00:00:0039Helles Memorial, GallipoliGRAHAM, Sapper John. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 71st. Field Company RE (42227). KIA in Gallipoli on the 25.7.15 aged 39, his death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panels 23-25. He was the husband of Agnes Graham of 11 Mayfield Street, Lisburn Road, Belfast.
310GrahamWilliam GeorgePvt37681RInFIrishDerryloran, Co. TyroneCookstownDunmurryTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-08-21 00:00:0024Helles Memorial, GallipoliGRAHAM  Private William George. Born in Derrylorgan, Co. Tyrone, he enlisted at Cookstown and served in A Company 1 RInF (3768). KIA in Gallipoli on the 21.8.15 age 24, his death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panels 97 to 101. He was the son of Mary J. Graham of 12 Milfort Avenue, Dunmurry and the late William Graham, and brother of Corporal Thomas Graham, above. Graham, WilliamGeorgeNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
311GrahamHedley Wm BrownriggRm1472910RIRIrishLisburnBelfastFranceSommeDOW1915-12-22 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceGRAHAM, Rifleman Hedley William Brownrigg. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 10 RIR (14729). He DoW in France on the 22.12.15 and was buried in Mailly Mallet Communal Cemetery on the Somme although his death is now commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A/B. It was also remembered by Wesley Graham of 66 Melrose Street, Belfast in an In Memoriam notice in the Herald on the 22.12.17.
312GrahamSkeffington T CPOF/2852ACBdeRNASAir ForceDunmurryTurkeyIstanbulDied/Pow/dysentery1917-01-01 00:00:0032Haidar Pasha Cemetery, TurkeyGRAHAM, Petty Officer Motor Mechanic Skeffington T.C. Served in the Russian Armoured Car Brigade, Royal Naval Air Service (F/2852). He died of dysentery in hospital whilst a PoW in Turkey on the 1.1.17 age 32. He was the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Robert Graham of Dunmurry and husband of Mary J. S. Graham of 164 Alton Avenue, Toronto, Canada. He is buried in Haidar Pasha Cemetery, Turkey, plot 1, row L, grave 10. Haidar Pasha is a suburb of Istanbul between Scutari (Uskudar) and Kadikoy on the Asiatic side of the Bosphorous. Haidar Pasha Cemetery was first established for Crimean war burials and was used during the First World War by the Turks for the burial of Commonwealth prisoners of war. After the Armistice, when Istanbul was occupied, further burials were made mainly from No 82 General Hospital and graves were brought in from other civil cemeteries in the area.
313GrahamWilliamLtColRAMCSupportHomeDundrodDied1917-11-05 00:00:00Dundrod Presbyterian Churchyard, Co. AntrimGRAHAM, Lieutenant Colonel William. He served in the RAMC and died on the 5.11.17. He is buried in Dundrod Presbyterian Churchyard, grave 13.
314GrahamWilliam John2Lt12RIRIrish18 RIRBelfastFranceCambraiKIA1917-11-22 00:00:0026Cambrai Memorial, Louverval Military Cemetery, FranceGRAHAM, 2nd. Lieutenant William John. Posted to 18 RIR and attached to 12 RIR, he was KIA in France on the 22.11.17 age 26. His death is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, France, panel 10 and also on the family headstone in Derriaghy Parish church graveyard. The inscription reads, “Thy will be done”. He was the son of William and Mary Nelson Graham of 67 Coolderry Street, Donegall Road, Belfast. Mary Graham died on the 14.10.37. His brother Robert N. Graham died on the 9.2.15 and sister Agnes G. Watson died on the 20.2.28.
315GrahamThomasCpl1775612RIRIrish11 RIR?CookstownLisburnDunmurryDunmurryBelgiumMessinesKIA1918-04-14 00:00:0022Wulverghem-Lindenhoek Road Military Cemetery, BelgiumGRAHAM, Corporal Thomas. Born in Cookstown, Co. Tyrone, he lived at Dunmurry, enlisted at Lisburn, and may have embarked for France from Bordon Camp as a riflemen in 11 RIR in October 1915. He served in B Company 12 RIR (17756) and was KIA in Belgium on the 14.4.18 age 22. He is buried in Wulverghem-Lindenhoek Road Military Cemetery, Belgium, plot 4, row C, grave 1 and was the son of William and Mary Jane Graham of 12 Milfort Avenue, Dunmurry, and brother of William George Graham, below. Graham, ThomasNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
316GrahamJames LawsonLt9RInFIrishBoardmillsBelgiumYpresDOW1918-09-30 00:00:0027Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumGRAHAM, Lieutenant James Lawson. Gazetted to the Inniskillings in August 1915 he served in 9 RInF. Wounded at the Somme in 1916 he was promoted to Lieutenant in July 1917 and DoW at Dadizelle in Belgium on the 30.9.18 aged 27. His death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium, Panels 70-2, also on a special memorial erected just inside the gate of 2nd. Boardmills Presbyterian church. The inscription on it reads, “Sans peur et sans reproche. Be thou faithful unto death and I will give thee a crown of life”. He was the son of Samuel J and Agnes Graham of Maple Vale, Boardmills, Co. Down and nephew of Dr. James Graham the City Coroner for Belfast. At the unveiling of the memorial to him at Boardmills in June 1920 Lieutenant Colonel Knox of the 9 RInF described, “the operations in which [James Graham] … met his death. … The previous day they had pushed the enemy out of [the Ypres Salient], and advanced for over nine miles. There was a thick fog in the morning … and a hollow came between them and their objective. They could just see the spire of a church, which was the direction of their advance. Lieutenant Graham was commanding a company which he led and the advance was met with very heavy fire. Late in the afternoon he heard that Lieutenant Graham was being carried down on a stretcher, and was able to see him; he knew that the young officer was severely wounded, he was then unconscious, and died a short time afterwards. … From reports he received later he learned that on the day he was killed Lieutenant Graham was the officer responsible for finally pushing the Germans out of the position, and everyone spoke highly of the way he encouraged his men forward and went about regardless of himself under heavy fire”. Graham, JamesLawsonNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
317GrantWilliam H.Pvt3.40322BWScottishBlarisKirkintilloch, Dumbartonshire FranceLensKIA1915-05-13 00:00:00Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg-l'Avoue, FranceGRANT, Private William H. Born in Blaris, Co. Down, he enlisted at Kirkintilloch, Dumbartonshire and served in 2 BW (3.4032). KIA in France on the 13.5.15, his death is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, France, panels 24-26.
318GrantWilliam JohnPvt102661RInFIrishLisburnBelfastFranceRearDOW1916-07-05 00:00:00Abbeville Communal Cemetery, FranceGRANT, Private William John. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RInF (10266). He DoW in France on the 5.7.16 and is buried in Abbeville Communal Cemetery, France, plot 4, row C, grave 13.
319GrantJohnRm7786RIRIrishMulliban, Co. DOWnDownpatrickFinnis, Co. DownDromaraHomeLeitrim, Co. DownDied1918-10-28 00:00:0028Leitrim Roman Catholic Churchyard, Co. DOWnGRANT, Rifleman John. Born in Mulliban, Co. Down, he lived at Finnis, Co. Down, enlisted at Downpatrick, and served in 6 RIR (778). He died at “home” on the 28.10.18 age 28 and is buried in Leitrim Roman Catholic Churchyard, County Down. He was the son of Patrick and Bridget Grant and husband of Mary Ann Grant of Dromara, Co. Down.
320GrayThomasRm1473214RIRIrishBallycoan, Co. AntrimBelfastBallycoan, Co. AntrimBallycoanHomeDrumboDied1916-05-23 00:00:0023Drumbo (Holy Trinity) Churchyard, Co. DOWnGRAY, Rifleman Thomas. Born and living in Ballycoan, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 14 RIR (YCV) (I4732). He died at “home” on the 23.5.16 age 23 and is buried in Drumbo (Holy Trinity) Church of Ireland Churchyard. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of George and Agnes Gray of Ballycoan, Purdysburn, Belfast. His Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone is laid flat on the family plot to the left of the path a little inside the gate of the church. Family burials in it date from 1961.
321GrayRobert JohnRm1767912RIRIrish11 RIRLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1918-04-15 00:00:00Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumGRAY, Rifleman Robert John. Born in Lisburn where he lived, he enlisted in the town and served in 11 RIR, embarking with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. Subsequently transferred to 12 RIR (17679), when 11 RIR were disbanded, he was KIA in Belgium on the 15.4.18. His death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium, panels 138-140. He was the son of John Gray of Wilson Street, Low Road, Lisburn and formerly of Tullynacross.
322GrayWilliam BlackstockSgt3608025 SqdnRAFAir ForceBelfast/BallylessonFranceRearDOW1918-08-15 00:00:0019Huby-St. Leu British Cemetery, FranceGRAY, Sergeant William Blackstock. Served in 25 Squadron, RAF (36080). He DoW in France on the 15.8.18 aged 19 and is buried in Huby-St. Leu British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France, row D, grave 3. He was the son of John A. and Margaret Gray of Milltown Cottage, Shaws Bridge, Belfast and grandson of the late Thomas Gray of Giant’s Ring House, Ballylesson, Lisburn. Huby-St Leu British Cemetery is 2 kilometres from Hesdin on the road to St Omer.Gray, WilliamBlackstockNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
323GreenHarold2Lt1RDFIrishLurganLurganFranceSommeKIA1917-02-28 00:00:0024Thiepval Memorial, FranceGREEN, 2nd. Lieutenant Harold. Born in Lurgan on the 7.7.1892 he was educated at Lurgan College and Friends’ School, Lisburn which he entered on the 13.9.04. His school reports show that his conduct was generally “satisfactory” but his work left something to be desired. 23.12.04 “He does not display sufficient earnestness in his class work, and we think he might have taken a better place in the late examination”. 21.7.05 “We think that his work except in French has not been altogether satisfactory. Conduct generally satisfactory”. In May 1905, aged 12 years and 10 months, he “gained an entrance scholarship at York”. (Bootham School is run by the Quakers there). However, on 16.7.05, “he was found ‘bullying’ a crippled boy and was whipped. His mother came up on the 18th to complain of this and his father brought the matter of corporal punishment up at the meetings of our Committee in July and August”. The final report dated 1.9.05 records that, “We do not consider that he worked as well as he might have done; and we think that he ought to have gained a better position in his form. He was sent in for the Second Class Certificate Examination of the College of Preceptors, but he only gained a Third Class Certificate”. There is no date given for his leaving FSL but he does appear to have continued his education at Bootham. KIA in France on the 28.2.17 while serving in 1 RDF, he was age 24. The son of William John and Susan E. Green of Kinnego, Lurgan, Co. Armagh, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 16C. Green, HaroldPat Geary/Green family Lurgan
324GreenThomasRm1776612RIRIrish11 RIRDunmurryLisburnDunmurryDunmurry/BelfastFranceOtherDied1918-10-10 00:00:0024Hautmont Communal Cemetery, FranceGREEN, Rifleman Thomas. Born and living in Dunmurry, before joining up he was an apprentice tenter at the Milfort Weaving Company in the village. He enlisted at Lisburn in 11 RIR and embarked with them for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Wounded in the right leg by shrapnel on the 1.7.16 while serving in the Lewis Gun Section, he recovered in Bramshott Military Hospital. Transferred to B Company 12 RIR (17766) he died in France on the 10.10.18 age 24 and is buried in Hautmont Communal Cemetery, Nord, France plot 4, row B, grave 36. He was the eldest son of Robert H. and Annie Green of Church View Terrace, Dunmurry and later of 57 Donegall Street, Belfast Green, ThomasNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
325GreenGDvr9982471 BtyRFASupportBallinderry?HomeBallinderryDied1918-11-30 00:00:0033Upper Ballinderry Presbyterian Churchyard, Co. AntrimGREEN, Driver G. MM. Served in 71 Battery RFA (99824). He died on the 30.11.18 age 33 and is buried in Upper Ballinderry Presbyterian Churchyard, grave 25. He was the son of Robert and Agnes Green. The headstone inscription reads, “In the midst of life we are in death”.
326GreerFrederick William MartinRm14/1777114RIRIrishDoncasterBelfastLurganCulcaveyBelgiumMessinesKIA1916-10-09 00:00:0025Pond Farm Cemetery, Wulverghem, BelgiumGREER, Rifleman Frederick William Martin. Born in Doncaster, York, he lived at Lurgan, Co. Armagh. An employee of the Ulster Bank, Belfast, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 14 RIR (YCV) (14/17771). KIA in Belgium on the 9.10.16 age 25, he is buried in Pond Farm Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium, row D, grave 14. He was the son of the late Thomas Greer of Culcavey, Hillsborough, Co. Down, and of Mary Greer of Beresford House, Coleraine.
327GreggJohn WillamRm1653313RIRIrishH'boroBelfastH'boro BallykeelH'boro, BallykeelHomeH'boroDOW1916-10-12 00:00:0027St. Malachi's Churchyard, HillsboroughGREGG, Rifleman John William. Born in Hillsborough, he lived at Ballykeel, Co. Down, enlisted at Belfast and served in C Company 13 RIR (16533). He DoW at home on the 12.10.16 aged 27 and is buried in St. Malachi Parish Church graveyard, Hillsborough. He was the son of James and Lucy Gregg of Ballykeel, Artifinny, Hillsborough. His sisters Emma and Maggie, also of Ballykeel, Artifinny, had the following poem included with an In memoriam notice they placed in the Herald on the 13.10.17. “Days of sadness still come o’er us, Unseen tears do often flow; Still memory keeps that loved one near us, Though he died one year ago. At the river’s crystal brink, Christ shall join each broken link”
328GreggThomasDvrT1/334RASC/7DivSupportH'boroBelfastLisburnItalyVicenzaDied1918-10-18 00:00:00Montecchio Precalcino Communal Cemetery Extension, ItalyGREGG, Driver Thomas L. Born in Hillsborough, he lived at Lisburn, enlisted at Belfast and served in the 7th. Division Train Horse Transport, RASC (T1/334). He died of pneumonia in Italy on the 18.10.18 on his way home and is buried in Montecchio Precalcino Communal Cemetery Extension, Italy, plot 7, row B, grave 2.
329GreggLouis ArthurDvrGREGG, Driver Louis Arthur. Commemorated on the War Memorial in Christ Church, Lisburn, there is no positive trace so far.
330GribbenWilliamPvt432237RInFIrish6977 CRLisburnBelfastLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-16 00:00:00Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumGRIBBEN  Private William. Born and living in Lisburn, he was a hairdresser by occupation, and shortly after the outbreak of war enlisted at Belfast in the CR (69777). Subsequently transferred on request to 7 RInF (43223) he was involved in the fighting at Guillemont and Ginchy on the Somme in 1916 before “contracting fever” and coming home for a few weeks. Also involved at Messines on the 7 June 1917, he was KIA in Belgium on the 16.8.17. His death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial Zonnebeke, Belgium panels 70 to 72. The eldest son of the late Charles Henry Gribben, himself a hairdresser, of Dublin Road, Lisburn, and Catherine Gribben of 5 Manor Street, Longstone, Lisburn, his brother Trooper Samuel Gribben of the Inniskilling Dragoons was at home on leave at the time of his death. On the second anniversary of his death his mother inserted the following In Memoriam notice in the Herald. “In the old home you are fondly remembered, Sweet, happy memories cling round your name; True hearts that loved you with deepest affection Always shall love you in death just the same. He is gone, oh, how hard, and no mother to be near To hear his last word or to dry his last tear; No parting farewell, no kind words of love, To cheer his last moments or point him above”.
331GriffinAlbertRm59302RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLisburnLisburnFrance/GermanySommeDOW1918-03-24 00:00:00Pozieres Memorial, FranceGRIFFIN, Rifleman Albert. Born in Blaris, he lived and enlisted at Lisburn and served in the Lewis Gun Section 2 RIR (5930). Reported missing from the 24.3.18 and still listed as missing on the 17.5.18 he was subsequently confirmed as having DoW in Germany on the 24.3.18. His death is commemorated on Pozieres Memorial, France, panels 74-6, also on the headstone of his parents grave in Blaris old Cemetery. His mother, Mary Griffin died on the 29.10.20, his father, Thomas James, on the 27.3.42. They had lived at 41 Sloan Street, Lisburn and had another son serving in the RE. On the 10 May they had a short notice included in the Standard saying that they, “would be glad to receive further news”. Probably the brother of Thomas Griffin, below, who died four days later. Griffen, AlbertNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
332GriffinThomasLcpl57969RESupportBallinderryBelfastLisburnFranceSommeKIA1918-03-28 00:00:00Pozieres Memorial, FranceGRIFFIN, Lance Corporal Thomas. Born in Ballinderry Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast, probably in 1914 and served in 36 Signal Company RE (57969). KIA in France on the 28.3.18, his death is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, Somme, France, panels 10 to 13. He was probably the brother of Albert Griffin (above) and son of Mary and Thomas James Griffin who lived at 41 Sloan Street, Lisburn and are buried in Blaris Old Cemetery.
333GriggsArchibald NelsonLsgt12442SeHScottishH'boroKentKentFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0020AIF Burial Ground, Grasslane, Flers, FranceGRIGGS, Lance sergeant Archibald Nelson. Born in Hillsborough, he enlisted at Kent and served in 2 SeH (1244). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 20, he is buried in the A.I.F. Burial Ground, Grass Lane, Flers, plot 6, row H, grave 2. The headstone inscription reads, “Greater love hath no man”. He was the son of Mr. E.H. and Mrs. K.E. Griggs of Ivy Cottage, Glen Avenue, Hearne Bay, Kent. The A.I.F. Burial Ground is some way from area where 2 SeH were engaged on the 1.7.16. They were involved in the attack just north of Beaumont Hamel. He is probably buried there because of the concentration of graveyards or the late discovery of his body. See Middlebrook’s Guide to the Somme and “The Somme – The Day by Day Account”, C. McCarthy p. 28.
334GrubbDonald James2Lt5RInFIrishBelfast ?BelfastTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-08-15 00:00:0020Helles Memorial, GallipoliGRUBB, 2nd. Lieutenant Donald James. Educated at Wesley College, he “was well known in sporting circles, being a first class swimmer, and a player who was not easily thrown aside in the rugby field”. He had entered the linen business sometime before 1914 and joined the QUB OTC on the outbreak of war. Gazetted to the Inniskillings in September 1914, he was later posted as Signalling Officer to 5 RInF. He left for the Dardanelles from Basingstoke on the 10 July 1915, landing with his battalion at Sulva Bay on the 7.8.15. He was KIA eight days later on the 15.8.15 aged 20. According to his CO, “he met his death while bravely attending the wounded at great personal risk under a very heavy fire.” His death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panels 97-101. He was the only son of the Rev. James Grubb and Jessie Grubb of 24 Stranmillis Road and Donegall Square, Belfast and nephew of Cpt. J.J. Grubb, late Royal West Surrey Regiment. The Rev. Grubb had been minister of Lisburn Methodist Church in Seymour Street before moving to the Methodist Church at Donegall Square, Belfast. Grubb, DonaldILC&LM
335GurnellRobert Matthew2Lt18RIRIrishBoardmills, LisburnBelgiumMessinesKIA1917-05-21 00:00:0020Pond Farm Cemetery, Wulverghem, BelgiumGURNELL, Second Lieutenant Robert Matthew. A member of Boardmills No Compromise Lodge 221 I.O.G.T., he joined the army as a cadet and received his commission in 18 RIR “a short time” before his death. He arrived in France on the 2 May and was KIA in Belgium less than three weeks later on the 21.5.17 age 20. On writing to his mother, Captain Somers his C.O. said, “I know that it will be a consolation, which all who have lost loved ones out here look for, to learn that it was in the performance of his duty he fell. He was killed by an enemy sniper at 5 a.m. on the 21st inst. I can assure you his death was without suffering, as it was instantaneous. I arrived just in times to be with him in his last moments”. The younger son of the late Lawrence and Mrs. Gurnell of Boardmills and formerly of Lisburn, Co. Antrim, he is buried in Pond Farm Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium , row N, grave 12. His death is also commemorated on the McComb family headstone in Boardmills Presbyterian churchyard.Gurnell, RobertMatthewPat Geary/Standard 1.6.17
336HaddockThomasRm1656011RIRIrishLisburnBelfastLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceHADDOCK, Rifleman Thomas. Born in and lived with his father at 117 Longstone Street, Lisburn, he was an employee of Mr. Johnston coal merchant of Bachelors’ Walk, Lisburn, and a member of the UVF. He enlisted at Belfast and served in B Company 11 RIR (16560). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, faces A/B.
337HaddockWilliamPvt67057SLREnglishBallinderryBelfastLisburnBelgiumMessinesKIA1917-06-13 00:00:00Oosttaverne Wood Cemetery, Wytschaete, BelgiumHADDOCK, Private William. Born in Ballinderry, Co. Antrim, he lived in Lisburn, enlisted at Belfast and served in 7 SLR (6705). KIA in Belgium on the 13.6.17, he is buried in Oosttaverne Wood Cemetery, Heuvelland, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium, plot 1, row A, grave 2.
338HaddockJamesCpl57705RESupportLurganBelfastBallinderry UpperFranceBelgian borderKIA1917-08-20 00:00:0036Outtersteene Communal Cemetery Extension, BailleulHADDOCK, Corporal James. Born in Lurgan, Co. Armagh, before the war he had worked for the Ordnance Survey. He enlisted at Belfast and served in 2 Field Survey Company RE (57705). KIA in France on the 20.8.17 age 36, he is buried in Outtersteene Communal Cemetery Extension, Bailleul, Nord, France, (close to the Franco-Belgian border), plot 1, row A, grave 34. His death is also commemorated on the family headstone in Aghalee burial ground. He was the son of John Haddock of Lower Ballinderry who died on the 16.2.36 aged 79 and Mary K. Haddock who died on the 28.10.50 aged 95. His brother, Gunner George M. Haddock who was born in Antrim on the 7.6.1887, enlisted in Vancouver on the 6.10.15 aged 28 and served with the CFA (476795). A single man and carpenter by trade, he was 5’ 9½” tall with a 39½” chest (fully expanded) and 3” expansion. Of a fair complexion, he had grey eyes and reddish hair. Wounded in June or early July 1917, he appears to have survived the war.
339HaireSamuelPvt2470310RDFIrishLisburnDublinLisburnLisburnFranceSommeDOW1916-11-16 00:00:0020Varennes Military Cemetery, FranceHAIRE, Private Samuel. Born in Lisburn, he had a Lisburn address but was employed in Dublin as a Civil Service clerk in Dublin. He enlisted there and served in 10 RDF (24703). Reported wounded in late September/early October 1916, he DoW in France on the 16.11.16 aged 20 and is buried in Varennes Military Cemetery, France, plot 1, row E, grave 85. He was the brother of Thomas Haire of 40 Llewellyn Avenue, Lisburn and the youngest son of the late Thomas Haire senior and Ellen Haire of Lisburn. Before his death Thomas Haire snr. had worked in Hilden. Haire, SamuelPat Geary/Standard 8.12.16 & Eddies Extracts
340HaleJames HenryRm282315RIRIrishLisburnBelfastBelfastBelgiumPloegsteertDOW1916-10-19 00:00:0035Ration Farm, La Plus Douve Cemetery Annex, Ploegsteert, BelgiumHALE, Rifleman James Henry. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 15 RIR (15/2823). He DoW in Belgium on the 19.10.16 aged 35 and is buried in Ration Farm (La Plus Douve) Annexe, Belgium, plot 3, row G, grave 8. There is no headstone inscription. He was the husband of Annie Hale of 38 Chief Street, Belfast.
341HamillShepherdRm379511RIRIrishGrange, Co. AntrimRandalstownMoiraToomebridgeHomeGrangeDied1915-09-03 00:00:0019Grange Corner Presbyterian Churchyard, Co. AntrimHAMILL, Rifleman Shepherd. Born in Grange, Co. Antrim, he lived at Moira, enlisted at Randalstown, and served in 11 RIR (3795). He died at “home” on the 3.9.15 age 19 – this was during the time that 11 RIR were training in Seaford, Sussex, where they had been since early July, and before they left for France in early October. He is buried in Grange Corner Presbyterian Churchyard, County Antrim, grave 284A. (Grange Corner is a few miles north east of Toome). The son of John and Nancy Hamill of Taylorstown, Toomebridge, Co. Antrim he was also the brother of Rifleman Alexander Hamill 20 RIR 3736 who died of pneumonia on the 21.4.16 age 21 and is buried in grave 284 of Grange Corner Presbyterian Churchyard. Like his brother he was born in Grange and enlisted at Randalstown, though his address was Toomebridge.
342HamiltonJohnPvt55941IGIrishLisburnClydebankLisburnLisburnFranceLensKIA1915-05-15 00:00:00Guards' Cemetery, Windy Corner, Cuinchy, FranceHAMILTON, Private John. Born and living in Lisburn, he was an Orangeman and member of Lisburn LOL 207. At the outbreak of the war he was working in Scotland and enlisted at Clydebank, Lanark in 1 IG (5594). Sent to the front “a few months later” he was KIA in France on the 15.5.15. According to the Standard he was, “killed in one of those charges that made the name of the Irish Guards famous”. Buried in the Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner, Guinchy, France, plot 4, row K, grave 39, he was the second son of John Hamilton of Linenhall Street, Lisburn. His brother James Hamilton had joined 11 RIR and at the time of John’s death was training at Clandeboye.
343HamiltonSamuelRm1656713RIRIrishH'boroBelfastH'boroFranceSommeKIA1916-06-28 00:00:00Martinsart British Cemetery, FranceHAMILTON, Rifleman Samuel. Born in Hillsborough, where he lived in Park Street, he enlisted at Belfast, served in 13 RIR (16567) and was KIA on the Somme on the 28.6.16. He and 13 colleagues in his company were killed (10 immediately and 4 later of wounds) by a German shell which landed amongst them as they paraded in Martinsart village square to go on duty. They were all buried in Martinsart British Cemetery plot 1, row A. All Commonwealth War Graves Commission entries for these men give grave 1, presumably it is a communal grave. Of the 14, 7 are on this list, CSM Beaston and Riflemen A.V. Crangle, R. Crawley, S. Hamilton, G. Heenan, T. Mercer and J.G. Thompson. Hamilton, SamuelNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
344HamiltonEdwardCpl148338RIRIrishDromoreBelfastDromoreDromoreBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-06 00:00:0021Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumHAMILTON, Corporal Edward. Born and living in Dromore, Co. Down (or Drumlough, south west of Annahilt) he enlisted at Belfast and served in A Co. 8 RIR (14833). KIA in Belgium on the 6.8.17 aged 21, he is buried in Tyne Cot Cemetery, Passchendaele, Belgium, plot 59, row E, grave 47. The headstone inscription reads, “Safe in the arms of Jesus”. He was the son of James and Elizabeth Hamilton of Leopoges, Dromore Co. Down.
345HamiltonCharlesPvt113932IGIrishLisburnHamilton, LanarkLisburnFranceRearDOW1918-04-04 00:00:00Etaples Military Cemetery, FranceHAMILTON, Private Charles. Born and living in Lisburn, he enlisted at Hamilton, Lanark and served in 2 IG (11393). He DoW in France on the 4.4.18 and is buried in Etaples Military Cemetery, France, plot 33, row D, grave 21A. There is no headstone inscription.
346HannaJosephRm85212RIRIrishLisburnLisburnFranceAisne/MarneKIA1914-09-20 00:00:0028Vailly British Cemetery, FranceHANNA, Rifleman Joseph. Born in Lisburn, he served in C Company 2 RIR (8521). KIA in France on the 20.9.14 aged 28, he is buried in Vailly British Cemetery, France, plot 2, row D, grave 17. He was the son of James and Eliza Hanna. Vailly-sur-Aisne is on the north bank of the River Aisne 13 kilometres east of Soissons and 18 kilometres south of Laon. It was the point at which the 3rd Division crossed the river on the 12th September 1914, in the advance from the Marne. It fell to the Germans in 1915. Lt. Col. Corbally, “History of the Royal Ulster Rifles” p. 98, records that 2 RIR were involved in the crossing of the Aisne a mile east of Vailly. “The Rifles were in a position above some old quarries and there they remained for ten miserable days [and] lost fifteen officers and three hundred men”. George Neill and Robert Smeaton, who were also in 2 RIR were killed at the same time (19th and 20th September respectively). They are commemorated on the La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre Memorial on the Marne. So too is William John Johnston 1 DCLI who was killed on the 9th. It commemorates those killed in the fighting from August to early September, who have no known grave.Hanna, JosephPat Geary/Standard 1914.10.30
347HannaAlexanderRm1782713RIRIrishLambegComberLambegLambegFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0027Thiepval Memorial, FranceHANNA, Rifleman Alexander. Born and living in Lambeg, he was a member of Lambeg LOL 138, enlisted at Comber and served in C Company 13 RIR (17827). Reported wounded and missing, and subsequently in September 1917 as having been KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 27, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, face A/B. He was the fourth son of John and Roseanne Hanna of Kesh House, Sandy Lane, Tullynacross, Lambeg. Four of his brothers were in the army, one of whom was a PoW in Germany at the time of Alexander’s death in 1916. Two others were serving in France and one in Salonica.
348HannaWilliamPvt136919RInFIrishLisburnBelfastFranceSommeKIA1918-03-29 00:00:00Pozieres Memorial, FranceHANNA, Private William. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 9 RInF (13691). KIA on the Somme on the 29.3.18, his death is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, France, panels 38-40.
349HannaFrancis JamesRm62811.13RIRIrish11 RIR?LisburnBelfastLisburnFranceAmiensKIA1918-03-30 00:00:00Rosieres Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceHANNA, Rifleman Francis James. Born and living in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 11/13 RIR (628). He may have embarked with 11 RIR for France from Bordon in October 1915. KIA in France on the 30.3.18, he is buried in Rosieres Communal Cemetery Extension, France, plot 2, row D, grave 14.
350HannaFrank LeslieLt3ASHScottishRASC Horse TransportBangorFinaghy, DunmurryBelfastHomeHollywood/KnockbredaDied/nephritis1918-07-26 00:00:0024Knockbreda Church of Ireland Churchyard, Co. DOWnHANNA, Lieutenant Frank Leslie. Born at Bangor, he lived at Finaghy, and served in the RASC (Horse Transport), and subsequently 3 ASH. He died in hospital at Holywood of nephritis contracted on active service on the 26.7.18 age 24 and is buried in Knockbreda Church of Ireland Churchyard, County Down, plot B, grave 259. He was the son of Francis and Marion Hanna of Gayfield, Finaghy Park, Belfast.
351HarknessRobertLcpl110216RIRIrishDromaraLurganArtana, DromaraArtana, DromaraBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-07 00:00:0021Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumHARKNESS, Lance Corporal Robert. Born in Dromara, Co. Down, he lived at Artana, Dromara, enlisted at Lurgan and served in 16 RIR (1102). KIA in Belgium on the 7.8.17 age 21, his death is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Ypres, Belgium, panel 40. He was the son of Edward and Mary Harkness of Artana, Dromara, Co. Down.
352HarrisonJamesPvt68942RInFIrishLisburnBelfastBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1914-11-07 00:00:0027Ploegsteert Memorial, BelgiumHARRISON, Private James. Born in Lisburn, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 2 RInF (6894). KIA in Belgium on the 7.11.14 aged 27, his death is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium, panel 5. He was the son of the late James and Agnes Harrison.
353HarrisonWilliamRm111686RIRIrishLisburnLisburnDunmurryDunmurryGreeceSalonikaDied/enteric fever1915-10-29 00:00:0022Kirechkoi-Hortakoi Military Cemetery, GreeceHARRISON, Rifleman William. Born in Lisburn, he lived at Mill (Hill?) Street Dunmurry with his widowed mother. A member of the Drumbeg Company of the Church Lads Brigade, the Dunmurry Company of the South Antrim Volunteers, UVF and Finaghy LOL 771, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 6 RIR (11168). He died of enteric (typhoid) in Salonika on the 29.10.15 aged 22 and is buried in Kirechkoi-Hortakoi Military Cemetery, Greece, grave 641. He was the son of Ellen Harrison of 3 Hill Street, Dunmurry, Belfast and the late Nathaniel Harrison. According to the Belfast News Letter, a rifleman Roger M’Ilroy who served in 11 RIR lived at 3 Hill Street, Dunmurry. He appears to have survived the war. Was he the previous occupant or a lodger? Mary Elizabeth McConnell (formerly McCauley) the mother of Robert McCauley lived at 2 Hill Street, Dunmurry. As well as a question mark about his address, there was confusion at the time of his death about where it had actually happened. According to the WOCL he had died in Gallipoli while the Standard reported that it was in hospital in Alexandria. Neither is likely given that he is buried in Greece. His battalion had been withdrawn from Gallipoli on the 29/30 September 1915, sent to Lemnos/Mudros and then to Salonika on the 4/5 October.
354HarrisonRobertRm1783913RIRIrishH'boroLisburnH'boroH'boroFranceSommeDOW1916-06-29 00:00:0024Forceville Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceHARRISON, Rifleman Robert. Born and living in Hillsborough, Co. Down, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in C Company 13 RIR (17839). He DoW in France on the 29.6.16 aged 24 and is buried in Forceville Communal Cemetery Extension, France, plot 2, row A, grave 10. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of the late John and Ann Jane Harrison of Hillsborough, Co. Down.
355HarrisonAlbert WesleyPvt85011RInFIrishLisburnBelfastHillhall, LisburnHillhall, LisburnFranceSommeDOW1917-03-06 00:00:0030Grove Town Cemetery, Meaulte, FranceHARRISON, Private Albert Wesley. Born in Lisburn, he lived at Hillhall, Lisburn, enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RInF (8501). He “died of severe shell wounds received in action” in France on the 6.3.17 aged 30 and is buried in Grove Town Cemetery, France, plot 3, row C, grave 35. The headstone inscription reads, “Father in thy gracious keeping leave we now my dear son sleeping”. He was the son of Margaret Spence of Hillhall, Lisburn, Co. Down. Harrison, AlbertWesleyNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
356HarveyHughRm222113RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0018Serre Road Cemetery No.2, FranceHARVEY, Rifleman Hugh. Born in Blaris, he lived in Lisburn where he enlisted and served in C Company 13 RIR (2221). Listed as missing and subsequently in June 1917, confirmed as having been KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 18. He is buried in Serre Road Cemetery Number 2, France, plot 11, row H, grave 2. The inscription on the headstone reads, “Rock of Ages cleft for me, let me hide myself in thee”. He was the son of Hugh and Lizzie Harvey of 84 Hillhall Road, Lisburn where his sister also lived. He had a brother on active service in Egypt.
357HarveyJohnRm1778811RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0038Thiepval Memorial, FranceHARVEY, Rifleman John. Born in Lisburn and resident at 20 Canal Street, he was an employee of the Island Spinning Company, a member of the Cromwell’s True Blues LOL, Largymore Star of the North RBP 198 and of the UVF. He enlisted at Lisburn and served in A Company 11 RIR (17788), embarking with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. KIA on the Somme on the 1 July 1916 aged 38, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, face A/B. He was the son of Hugh and Margaret Harvey and husband of Lucy Harvey of 20 Canal Street, Lisburn. On the 5 July 1919 she had the following notice published in the Herald, “We, who loved you, sadly miss you, As it dawns another year; In the lonely hours of thinking, Thoughts of you are ever near”. They had four children. He also had a sister Maggie and niece Jessie Collington and nephew Robert Harvey, and an aunt and uncle Ellen and Nathaniel Hunter of New Church, Islandmagee.
358Harvey (Mawhinney)Joseph MawhinneyRm599110RIRIrishCarryduffBelfastLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1915-11-20 00:00:00Sucrerie Military Cemetery, Colincamps, FranceHARVEY, Rifleman Joseph Mawhinney. He may have served under the name of Mawhinney as the CWGC, WOCL and IMR all list him as that. Born in Carryduff, Co. Down, he lived at 7 Wilson Street, Low Road, Lisburn and worked as a farm hand for Mr. S. Gibson of Newtonbreda. He enlisted at Belfast shortly after the outbreak of the war, served in 10 RIR (5991) and was KIA on the Somme on the 20.11.15 aged 23. According to a friend who wrote home about his death, he, “was shot in the forehead while on sentry duty and died in a few moments”. Commenting on his death, the editor of the Standard felt that he had had, “The honour and glory of being the first Lisburn man in the Ulster Division to fall”. Joseph Mawhinney Harvey is buried in Sucrerie Military Cemetery, Colincamps, France, plot 3, row E, grave 12. There is no headstone inscription. He was the eldest and only son eligible for military service, of Mary Harvey of Wilson Street, Low Road, Lisburn. Harvey, JosephMawhinneyPat Geary/Standard 1915.12.10
359HastingsMargaretCivSS LusitaniaLisburnNew York/LisburnLisburnAt SeaOff Souttern IrelandKilled/drowned1915-05-07 00:00:0040Old Church Cemetery, Queenstown (Cobh)?HASTINGS, Mrs. Margaret. Civilian. Margaret Hastings nee Gardiner was born in Lisburn in about 1875. The wife of David Hastings, a flesher who may have lived on the Lisburn Road in Belfast, her father Patrick Gardener lived at Ballentine in Lisburn and she had four brothers living in the neighbourhood of the town. The Hastings had five children, the first son John was born in Belfast about 1894 or 1895, another son and a daughter followed in the next four years while two more sons, Freddie and Robert made up the family. In May 1908 Margaret Hastings was living at 12 Market Square, Lisburn and she was still resident in the town up to 1910 when she emigrated to America. By this time she was a widow and had decided to go overseas to earn a living.

She sailed for the States on the 2 July leaving from Londonderry and travelling as a steerage passenger on the SS Furnessia, a 30 year old Anchor Line vessel which would be scrapped the following year. The journey took ten days and the Furnessia docked in New York on the 12 July. Aged 35 Margaret Hastings was literate, a housekeeper by occupation and had $25 to her name. In good health, she was 5’ 3” tall, had a fair complexion, fair hair and grey eyes. Although she had never been to the United States before, at least two of her brothers John and James Gardiner had, each travelling between Ireland and America on a number of occasions.

John had been the first to make the crossing probably in 1903. He had stayed for two years and returned again in February 1905. A shop assistant, he lived with his aunt Mrs. Howie at 9 Leroy Place in New Rochelle on the northern side of Long Island sound. It was there that he was joined in July that year by his brother James, a 21 year old, 6’ tall plumber who like their sister had a fair complexion, fair hair and blue eyes. He seems to have gone home for a time around 1908 but returned to America early in May that year by which time he was living at 36 Drake Avenue in New Rochelle. By the time his sister arrived to stay with him in the summer of 1910, he had moved to 1 Anderson Street.

When Elizabeth Hastings emigrated to America she had left her children in the care of friends and relatives at home. Her 11 year old daughter was living in Belfast with her grandmother while the two youngest boys lived in Mercer Street, Lisburn with Samuel Chambers, a stationer, and his wife. The two eldest boys, however, would join her in America. When the second one came over is unknown but John, her first born made the crossing in 1911 at the age of 17. Sailing on the SS Caledonia from Londonderry on the 15 April that year he arrived in New York eight days later on the 23rd. Single, literate and a shop assistant by occupation, he was in good health, 5’ 4” tall, had a fair complexion, fair hair and blue eyes. His final destination was his mother’s home which was then 43 Union Street in New Rochelle although by April 1912 she had moved to 29 Le Count Place.

At that time James had been back in Ireland again, returning to America on the Cameronia which left from Londonderry on the 13 April. He would have been on the second day of his journey when Titanic, which had departed from Queenstown on the 11th, was lost in the early hours of the 15 April 1912. A little over three years later on the 7 May 1915, his sister would die in another great liner, the Lusitania.

Margaret Hastings had lived in New York for almost five years by the time she began her journey home to Lisburn to settle down with her family. While her two eldest sons, now aged 20 and 18, were living in America, her 16 year old daughter and two youngest sons, Robert and Freddie were still living in Ireland.

Why she chose to take the Lusitania, on which she travelled as a second class passenger, is unknown. Perhaps her circumstances had changed and she was better able to afford it. Certainly, apart from James’ first trip out in 1905, her brothers had always used second cabin accommodation rather than steerage suggesting that the family was not amongst the poorest in the world. Perhaps having experienced the delights of steerage class on her outward journey the prospect of more comfortable accommodation on her return was more than appealing. Certainly, as the Lisburn Standard reported on the 14 May, the “passenger accommodation was most luxurious, a feature which accounted in no small measure for the popularity of the vessel among Transatlantic travellers”.

The Lusitania left New York on the 1 May 1915 with over 2500 passengers and crew on board. She was expected to arrive in Liverpool by Saturday, May 8 but was torpedoed by the U20 off the Old Head of Kinsale just after 2 p.m. on the 7th. She sank in 18 minutes. Over the years theories have abounded about the cause of her rapid demise and whether or not she had been deliberately placed in danger by a British government desperate for the United States to enter the war. Whatever the truth 1201 of those on board lost their lives. Amongst those to perish was Margaret Hastings. She was 40 years old.

On Monday morning the 10 May, having received no news of her, Robert Gardiner her brother from Ballantine in Lisburn and Samuel Chambers the stationer from Mercer Street who had been caring for Freddie and Robert her two youngest boys, travelled to Queenstown to search for her. With the help of a photograph they had taken with them they found, or so the Standard reported, that she had been one of the first to be buried in a mass grave containing sixty six coffins. Certainly they were assured by a number of people that her body had been recovered and buried although perhaps they were being told what those they spoke to believed they wanted to hear. If indeed this was the case, Margaret Hastings was probably buried on Saturday 8 May in one of three mass graves at Old Church Cemetery two miles outside Queenstown (Cobh) although her body remains officially unidentified.
360HawthornAlbert A.Rm253412RIRIrishMagheragallLisburnMagheragallMagheragallBelgiumMessinesKIA1918-09-02 00:00:0024Messines Ridge British Cemetery, BelgiumHAWTHORN, Rifleman Albert A. Born and living in Magheragall, Co. Antrim with his wife, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 12 RIR (2534). KIA in Belgium on the 2.9.18 aged 24, he is buried in Messines Ridge, British Cemetery, Belgium, plot 1, row C, grave 41. The headstone inscription reads, “Ever remembered by his wife and family”. His brother-in-law, Sergeant John Phillips was also on active service. He may have been a brother of Thomas Hawthorne, below, and possibly a son of Mrs. Hawthorne of Magheragall who had six sons (Charles, Thomas, Hugh, George and Albert in the Ulster Division, William John in the Cameronians), a stepson (James, in the Ulster Division) and a son-in-law (William Moore, in the Ulster Division) serving in the army. In the Spring of 1915, Mrs. Hawthorne received a letter of appreciation from the King acknowledging the “patriotic spirit” which had prompted her sons to enlist. Her brother William Dickson had four sons serving, two (John and Joseph) in the Royal Navy, William Henry in the ELR and Charles in the Ulster Division.
361HawthorneJohnRm94521RIRIrishLambegBelfastFranceLensKIA1915-03-17 00:00:00Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg-l'Avoue, FranceHAWTHORNE, Rifleman John. Born in Lambeg, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RIR (9452). KIA in France on the 17.3.15, his death is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, France.
362HawthorneThomasRm302811RIRIrishMagheragallLisburnMoiraMoira/MagheragallFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0037Thiepval Memorial, FranceHAWTHORNE, Rifleman Thomas. Born in Magheragall, Co. Antrim, he lived at Moira, enlisted at Lisburn, and served in B Company 11 RIR (3028). Reported missing on the 16.7.16 and subsequently KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 37, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A/B. He was the son of the late William Hawthorne of Magheragall and husband of Mary Hawthorne of Derryrisk, Moira, Co. Down. He may have been a brother of Albert Hawthorn, above, and was probably the son of Mrs. Hawthorne of Magheragall who had six sons (Charles, Thomas, Hugh, George and Albert in the Ulster Division, William John in the Cameronians), a stepson (James, in the Ulster Division) and a son-in-law (William Moore, in the Ulster Division) serving in the army. In the Spring of 1915, Mrs. Hawthorne received a letter of appreciation from the King acknowledging the “patriotic spirit” which had prompted her sons to enlist. Her brother William Dickson had four sons serving, two (John and Joseph) in the Royal Navy, William Henry in the ELR and Charles in the Ulster Division.
363HawthorneWilliam RobertPvt64737RIrRIrishDromoreHamiltonNew LanarkNew LanarkFranceRearDOW1918-09-02 00:00:0019Arneke British Cemetery, FranceHAWTHORNE, Private William Robert. Born in Dromore, Co. Down, he lived at New Lanark, enlisted at Hamilton, Lanarkshire and served in A Company 7 RIrR (6473). He DoW in France on the 2.9.18 aged 19 and is buried in Arneke British Cemetery, Nord, France, plot 3, row D, grave 22. He was the son of William Robert and Mary Hawthorne of 2 New Buildings, New Lanark. His death is also commemorated on the family headstone in Drumlough Presbyterian churchyard (south west of Annahilt and south east of Hillsborough). His father William Robert died on the 3.4.1925 aged 63 and his mother Mary on the 27.1.1946 aged 76. They would have been approximately 57 and 48 respectively at the time of their son’s death and had also lost a daughter Annie aged 1 year on the 21.9.1903.
364HazletonJohn DouglasCpl88353231CEF ARImperialBelfastOlds, AlbertaOlds, AlbertaBelfast/LarneFranceArrasDOW1918-06-25 00:00:0033Wanquentin Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceHAZELTON, Corporal John Douglas. Born in Belfast on the 24.11.1884, he was an old scholar of Belfast Royal Academy. He had been in the QUB Officer Training Corps for two years, graduating from Queens with a B.A. in 1906. A barrister by profession he practiced at Royal Avenue, Belfast before emigrating to Canada where he lived at Olds, Alberta. Enlisting at Olds on the 1.7.16 having had no previous military experience, he was posted to the 187 Overseas Battalion and subsequently served in 31 CI AR (883532). He was 6’ tall with a chest measurement of 38½” and a 4” expansion, his complexion was ruddy and he had blue eyes and light brown hair. He DoW on the 25.6.18 age 33 and is buried in Wanquentin Communal Cemetery Extension, Pas de Calais, France, Plot 2, row B, grave 1. The cemetery is about 12K west of Arras. He was the son of the Rev. Edward and A.I.L. Hazelton who were living in Larne at the time of JDH’s enlistment and death, and subsequently at 6 Windsor Park, Belfast.
365HeaneyThomas/John?Rm128211RIRIrishCrumlinDundrodFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceHEANEY, Rifleman Thomas (or John). Born in Crumlin he lived at Dundrod. Enlisting in Lisburn he served in D Co. 11 RIR (1282) with whom he embarked for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Listed as missing and subsequently KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15A and 15B. It is not clear what his Christian name was. The CWGC and WOCL give John but Dundrod Presbyterian Church, the Standard and the 11 RIR embarkation list give him as Thomas.
366HeaneyJamesGnr92607D Bty 177 BgdRFASupportMoiraKilmarnockBelgiumMessinesKIA1917-05-29 00:00:00Locre churchyard, BelgiumHEANEY, Gunner James. Born in Moira, Co. Down, he enlisted at Kilmarnock, Ayr and served in D Battery, 177 Brigade, RFA (92607). KIA in Belgium on the 29.5.17, he is buried in Loker Churchyard, Belgium, grave 5.
367HeasleyAlexanderPvt91271KLREnglishLisburnLiverpoolBroomhedge, MoiraBroomhedge, MoiraFranceArrasKIA1917-05-03 00:00:0035Arras Memorial, Faubourg D'Amiens Cemetery, FranceHEASLEY, Private Alexander. Born in Lisburn, and living at Broomhedge, Moira, he enlisted at Liverpool and served in 1 KLR (9127). KIA in France on the 3.5.17 age 35, his death is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France, bay 3. He was the son of James Heasley, Broomhedge Bogs, Moira, Co. Down.
368HeenanGeorgeRm1785613RIRIrishH'boroLisburnH'boroH'boroFranceSommeKIA1916-06-28 00:00:0020Martinsart British Cemetery, FranceHEENAN, Rifleman George. Born and living in Hillsborough, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 13 RIR (17856). He was KIA on the Somme on the 28.6.16 aged 20. He and 13 colleagues in his company were killed (10 immediately and 4 later of wounds) by a German shell which landed amongst them as they paraded in Martinsart village square to go on duty. They were all buried in Martinsart British Cemetery plot 1, row A. The headstone inscription reads, “Father in thy gracious keeping leave we now thy servant sleeping”. He was the son of Richard and Mary J. Heenan of Hillsborough, Co. Down. All Commonwealth War Graves Commission entries for these men give grave 1, presumably it is a communal grave. Of the 14, 7 are on this list, CSM Beaston and Riflemen A.V. Crangle, R. Crawley, S. Hamilton, G. Heenan, T. Mercer and J.G. Thompson. Heenan, GeorgeILC&LM
369HemphillRichard PatrickCptRFCAir Force6 LRBirr, King's CountyDunmurryEgyptHeliopolisKilled/accident1917-03-24 00:00:0023Cairo War Memorial Cemetery, EgyptHEMPHILL, Captain Richard Patrick. Born in Birr, King's Co. he served in 6 LR and the RFC. Accidentally killed at Heliopolis, Egypt on the 24.3.17 age 23, he is buried in Cairo War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt, row F, grave 203. He was the son of the Rev. Samuel and Flora Margaret Hemphill of Drumbeg Rectory, Dunmurry, Co. Antrim.
370HendersonJamesLcpl507422021-05-02 00:00:00NSREnglishRASC Ulster DivDunmurryBelfastFranceSommeDOW1917-12-08 00:00:00Rocquingny-Equancourt Road British Cemetery, Manancourt, FranceHENDERSON, Lance Corporal James. Born in Dunmurry, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in the Ulster Division RASC (T4/045325) before being transferred to 2/5 NSR (50742). He DoW on the Somme on the 8.12.17 and is buried in Rocquigny-Equancourt Road British Cemetery, Manancourt, Somme, France, plot 5, row E grave 23. There is no headstone inscription.
371HendersonThomasSgt122422174RGASupportEssex and Suffolk RGAH'boroHarwichParkeston, EssexFranceOtherKIA1918-09-25 00:00:00Jeancourt Communal Cemetery, FranceHENDERSON, Sergeant Thomas. MM. Born in Hillsborough, Co. Down, he lived at Parkeston, Essex, enlisted at Harwich and served in 87 Essex and Suffolk RGA, before being transferred to 174 Siege Battery RGA (122422). KIA in France on the 25.9.18, he is buried in Jeancourt Communal Cemetery Extension, France, plot 2, row B, grave 5. There is no headstone inscription.
372HeronRobertRm1786611RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-12 00:00:0023Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumHERON, Rifleman Robert. Born at Blaris, and living at Barnsley Row in Lisburn, he had worked at Robert Stewart and Son’s thread manufacturing mill before the war. He enlisted at Lisburn and serving in B Company 11 RIR (17866). Wounded/gassed on the 1st. September 1916 he was subsequently KIA in Belgium on the 12.8.17 aged 23. His brother Corporal William Heron who was also in 11 RIR, was present at his burial. A few days later on the 16th August he, William, was wounded in the attack at Langemarck but appears to have survived. Robert Heron’s grave was subsequently lost and his death is now commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, panel 40. He was the youngest son of William and Ellen Heron of 8 Barnsley Row, Lisburn. William Heron senior had been a soldier too, serving under Lord Roberts in Afghanistan where he had risen to the rank sergeant. On the 15.9.17 Robert heron’s parents included the following poem along with his death notice in the Herald. “Oh! Darling son I little thought, When first I cradled thee, That on the battlefield of death, You’d lie so far from me. And when my heart is breaking, I seem to hear him say – Keep up your heart dear mother, We will meet again some day”.
373HewittJohnLsgt127606RInFIrishMoiraBelfastMoiraFranceOtherDOW1918-11-08 00:00:0026Premont British Cemetery, Aisne, FranceHEWITT  Lance Sergeant John. Born in Moira, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 6 RInF (12760). He served in Gallipoli, Salonika, Egypt and Palestine before he DoW in France on the 8.11.18 age 26. Buried in Premont British Cemetery, Aisne, France, plot 2, row C, grave 17, he was the son of Alfred V. and Margaret Hewitt (nee Kidd) of Moira, Co. Down. Premont is a village 19.5 kilometres south-east of Cambrai on the road to Guise and a little south-east of the main road from St. Quentin to Le Cateau.
374HillGeorge FrederickLcpl177712RIRIrishClandeboyeLurganBallinderryBelgiumYpres/Kemmel HillKIA1918-04-12 00:00:0024Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumHILL, Lance Corporal George Frederick. He lived in Lurgan, enlisted at Clandeboye and served in 12 RIR (1777). Reported missing near Kemmel Hill, Flanders and subsequently KIA in Belgium on the 12.4.18 age 24, his death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Zonnebeke, Belgium, panels 138 to 140, 162 to 162A and 163A. He was also commemorated by his mother on the family headstone in Ballinderry Middle Church where the inscription reads, “Loves last gift – Remembrance”. He was the son of Maria Jane Hill of Lisburn Road, Ballinderry Upper, Co. Antrim. Hill, GeorgeFrederickNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
375HillisJohnRm1788012RIRIrish11 RIREdinburghLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1918-04-12 00:00:00Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumHILLIS, Rifleman John. Born at Edinburgh, and living in Lisburn, he enlisted there and embarked for France from Bordon with A Company 11 RIR in October 1915. He was one of the men involved in the attempt to save Henry Corkin from drowning on the 17.5.16 (see above) and was himself wounded at the Somme on the 1.7.16. Subsequently transferred to 12 RIR (17880) and possibly reported wounded in September 1917, he was KIA in Belgium on the 12.4.18. His death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium, panels 138-140.
376HillocksWilliamPvt71830NIHIrishCerragby, Co. AntrimAntrimLisburnFranceRearDied1918-11-10 00:00:00Mount-Huon Military Cemetery, Le Trepot, FranceHILLOCKS, Private William. Born in Cerragby, Co. Antrim, and living in Lisburn, he enlisted at Antrim and served in the NIH, British Cavalry Base Depot, (71830). He died in France on the 10.11.18 and is buried in Mount-Huon Military Cemetery, Le Trepot, France, plot 8, row O, grave 9B.
377HodginJohnRm1779911RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1916-09-01 00:00:00Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumHODGIN, Rifleman John. Born and living in Lisburn, he enlisted there and served in 11 RIR (17799) embarking with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. KIA in Belgium on the 1.9.16, his death is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, Belgium, panel 40. He was the brother of Lena English of 32 Mercer Street, Lisburn. She and her husband Thomas inserted the following poem along with an In Memoriam notice in the Herald on the 1.9.17, exactly a year after his death. “He will answer no more the roll call, Nor rush at the bugle sound; But, Lord when the roll is called in Heaven, May his name in the book be found”.
378HoggWalter GordonLt15RIRIrishKnock, Co. DOWnBelgiumMessinesKIA1917-05-24 00:00:0022Pond Farm Cemetery, Wulverghem, BelgiumHOGG, Lieutenant Walter Gordon. An old scholar of Friends’ School Lisburn, he served in 15 RIR. KIA in Belgium on the 24.5.17 aged 22, he is buried in Pond Farm Cemetery, Belgium, row C, grave 7. The headstone inscription reads, “Until the day break”. He was the son of Walter Gordon Hogg of Mertoun, Knock, Co. Down.
379HoldcroftRobertSgt88537NSREnglishStaffordshireStaffordshireBelfastMiddle EastMesopotamiaDOW1916-04-09 00:00:00Basra War Cemetery, IraqHOLDCROFT, Sergeant Robert. Born in Burslem, Staffordshire, he lived in Belfast, enlisted at Lichfield, Staffordshire and served in 7 NSR (8853). He DoW in Mesopotamia on the 9.4.16 and is buried in Basra War Cemetery, Iraq, plot 6, row Q, grave 1.
380HollywoodArthur CarsonLt9RIrFIrishBangorFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0024Thiepval Memorial, FranceHOLLYWOOD, Lieutenant Arthur Carson. Born on the 29.12.1891 he was an old scholar of Friends’ School, Lisburn. He entered the school on the 7.9.03 and left on the 20.7.06 during which time his reports were "excellent" or "very satisfactory". Serving in 9 RIrF he was wounded early in 1916 and later KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 24, the same day as his younger brother James Holllywood, (below). His death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, face A. He was the son of Elizabeth Hollywood and the late James Hollywood of Bangor and a brother of David Hollywood, also a past pupil of F.S.L. Hollywood, ArthurCarsonPat Geary/instgreatwar.com Alan Curragh
381HollywoodJames2Lt12RIRIrish18 RIRBangorFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0023Thiepval Memorial, FranceHOLLYWOOD, 2nd. Lieutenant James. Born on the 16.4.1893, he was an old scholar of Friends’ School, Lisburn. He entered school on the 16.9.04 and left on the 20.7.06 during which time his reports were "satisfactory", although the first comment was to the effect that, “We think that he needs to put a good deal more energy into his work”. Posted to 18 RIR and attached to the 12th. battalion, he was KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 23, the same day as his older brother Arthur Hollywood, above. His death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, face A/B. He was the son of Elizabeth Hollywood and the late James Hollywood of Bangor and a brother of David Hollywood, also a past pupil of F.S.L. Hollywood, JamesPat Geary/instgreatwar.com Alan Curragh
382HolmesJamesPvt17083Plymouth DivRMLINavyLisburnLisburnHomePortlandDOW1915-03-02 00:00:0019Portland Royal Naval Cemetery, EnglandHOLMES, Private James. He lived on the Low Road, Lisburn and served in the Plymouth Division, Royal Marine Light Infantry (Ply/17083). He DoW on the 2.3.15 age 19 while serving on HMS London during the German raid on Scarborough. Buried in Portland Royal Naval Cemetery, England, grave 549, he was the son of Thomas and Annie Holmes of 2 Low Road, Lisburn, Co. Antrim. He had two brothers who also served in the war. Sergeant W.J. Holmes who worked in Belfast before the war, and lived with his wife at Millbrook Road, on the Low Road in Lisburn. A reservist and member of the UVF, he served in 2 IG and won the DCM at Loos on the 29.9.15. In a letter published in the Standard on the 26.11.15 one of his colleagues, Sgt. Rolleston, described him as, “a great warrier [who] made a name for himself … at the outbreak of the war”. Home on leave in the second week of January 1916, he received his DCM from the King on St. Patrick’s Day 1916 and the occasion was marked the next day by the presentation of a purse of sovereigns subscribed by the people of Lisburn. Private Thomas Holmes, also of the IG, “gave up a lucrative post in America on the outbreak of the war” to return home and enlist. Both appear to have survived the war. Holmes, JamesILC&LM
383HoppsRobertRm64692RIRIrishBallinderg?BrookshillBallinderryFranceSommeKIA1918-03-24 00:00:0023Pozieres Memorial, FranceHOPPS, Rifleman Robert. Born in Lower Ballinderg, Co. Derry, he enlisted at Brookshill, Co. Derry and served in 2 RIR (6469). KIA on the Somme on the 24.3.18 age 23, his death is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, France, panels 74 to 76. He was the son of Edward and Annie Hopps of Ballinderry Lower, Lisburn, Co. Antrim.
384HornerJohn R.Pvt77039RInFIrishLisburnBelfastBangorBelgiumPoperingheDOW1918-09-30 00:00:00Haringhe, Bandaghem, Military Cemetery, BelgiumHORNER Private John R. Born in Lisburn, he lived in Bangor, enlisted at Belfast and served in 9 RInF (7703). He DoW in Belgium on the 30.9.18 and is buried in Haringhe (Bandaghem) Military Cemetery, Belgium, plot3, row B, grave 20. There is no headstone inscription. From July 1917 this cemetery was used by 62 and 63 Casualty Clearing Stations, and burials from these and other hospitals, notably 36 CCS, continued until October 1918.
385HoweGilbert Frederick TemplePvt2945316CEF MtbaRImperialH'boroValcartier, Quebec, CanadaHamilton, OntarioLondonBelgiumYpresKIA1915-04-23 00:00:0029Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumHOWE  Private Gilbert Frederick Temple. Born in Hillsborough on the 9.6.1885 he emigrated to Canada “some years ago” and was an insurance agent, running a firm with another Ulsterman in Hamilton, Ontario. A single man with no previous military experience, he enlisted at Valcartier on the 23.9.14. He was 6’ 1½” tall and had a 34” chest with 4” expansion. Of a swarthy complexion, he had brown eyes, black hair and tattoos on both his forearms. He served in 16 CI MtbaR (29453) and was KIA at St. Julien in Belgium on the 23.4.15 age 29. His death is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Ypres, Belgium, panels 24 – 30. The eldest son of Frances Mary Howe of 1 Radnor Place, Hyde Park, London and the late T. S. Howe of Hillsborough, his father had been agent for the Marquis of Dufferin and Ava. His brother Edward Barhah Howe who had emigrated to Australia, enlisted there and by 1915 was serving in Gallipoli. He appears to have survived the war.
386HuddlestoneWilliamPvt129192RIrFIrish11790 RIRLisburnLisburnLisburnGreeceSalonicaDied/malaria1916-10-02 00:00:0017Lahana Military Cemetery, GreeceHUDDLESTONE, Private William. Born in and enlisting at Lisburn, he served in the RIR (11790) before being transferred to 2 RIrF (12919). He died from malaria in Salonica on the 2.10.16 age 17 and is buried in Lahana Military Cemetery, Greece, plot 1, row A, grave 3. He was the only son of Elizabeth Huddlestone of 40 Church Street, Lisburn.
387HughesWilliamPvts/107441CHScottishBlantyre, LanarkshireGlasgowBelfast/CambuslangLisburnFranceLensKIA1915-01-27 00:00:0024Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg-l'Avoue, FranceHUGHES, Private William. Born in Blantyre, Lanarkshire, he had an address in Belfast but also lived in lodgings at 26 Bank Street, Cambuslang. On the outbreak of the war he enlisted in Glasgow and was sent to the front on the 4 January 1915 where he served in 1 CH (S/10744). He was KIA just over three weeks later on the 27.1.15 aged 24. Lance Corporal T. Jamieson who had served with Hughes in the Cameron Highlanders wrote to his mother telling her of her son’s death. Under the headline, “Another Lisburn Soldier Killed”, the Standard, reported that, “he was shot through the head in the trenches, death being instantaneous”. His death is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France, panels 41 and 42. He was the son of Mrs. Hughes who lived in Lisburn.
388HughesArthurCpl84351RIRIrishBelfastBelfastLisburnFranceLensKIA1915-03-10 00:00:00Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg-l'Avoue, FranceHUGHES, Corporal Arthur. Born in Belfast, he lived in Lisburn, enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RIR (8435). KIA in France on the 10.3.15, his death is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, France, panels 42-3.
389HughesJohnPvt154217.8RIrFIrishLambegLisburnHildenBelgiumMessinesKIA1917-06-07 00:00:00La Clytte Military Cemetery, Reninghelst, BelgiumHUGHES, Private John. Born in Lambeg, he lived at Hilden, enlisted at Lisburn and served in 7/8 RIrF (15421). KIA in Belgium on the 7.6.17, he is buried in La Clytte Military Cemetery, Reninghelst, Belgium, plot 6, row A, grave 11. There is no headstone inscription. A sister and two of his brothers were drowned at different times in the Lagan Canal.
390HughesThomasRm644212RIRIrishBelfastBallinderryBallinderryBallinderryBelgiumPoperingheDOW1918-10-13 00:00:00Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, BelgiumHUGHES, Rifleman Thomas. Born in Belfast, he lived in Ballinderry, Co. Antrim where he enlisted, serving in 12 RIR (6442). Reported wounded in November 1917, he DoW in Belgium on the 13.10.18, and is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, Belgium, plot 30, row B, grave 24. He was the grandson of Eliza Mooney of Ballinderry Upper, Co. Antrim.
391HughesWilliam HenryRm1790112RIRIrish11 RIR?LisburnLisburnFranceRearKIA1918-10-27 00:00:00Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille, FranceHUGHES, Rifleman William Henry. Born and enlisting at Lisburn possibly in 11 RIR, he served in 12 RIR (17901). KIA in France on the 27.10.18, he is buried in Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille, France, plot 8, row B, grave 2. There is no headstone inscription.Hughes, WilliamHenryPat Geary/Lisburn.com
392HughesJohnHUGHES, John. Commemorate on the Roll of Honour for Lisburn Roman Catholic Church published in the Standard on the 22.12.16, there is no positive trace so far.
393HullGeorge HenryLcpl17687MGC(I)SupportRIR? 17905LambegLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceHULL, Lance Corporal George Henry. Born in Lambeg, he enlisted at Lisburn in the RIR (17905) and embarked as Rifleman with 11 RIR for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Transferred to 108 Company MGC(I) (17687), the same Company as Corporal R.J. Corken, above, he was KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16. His death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 5C or 12C. He had two brothers on active service, one, Private Robert Hull, below, was KIA on the 11.10.18. His parents George and Hariette Hull of 7 Eagle Terrace, Low Road, Lisburn, inserted the following poem along with an In Memoriam notice in the Herald on the 30 June 1917. “One year is gone but yet we miss him, There is such a vacant place; Can we ever forget his footsteps, And his dear familiar face? God knows how much we miss him, He counts the tears we shed; And wispers, hush, he only sleeps, Your loved one is not dead”. Another published on the 5 July 1919 remembered their two dead sons. “Though their graves are apart, Their souls are not divided; Together to their Father’s home With joyful hearts they go, And dwell together with the Lord, Beyond the reach of woe”.
394HullMatthewRm644112RIRIrishLurganLurganAghaleeBelgiumYpresKIA1918-04-12 00:00:0019Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumHULL, Rifleman Matthew. Born and enlisting at Lurgan, he served in 12 RIR (6441). KIA in Belgium on the 12.4.18 age 19, his death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Zonnebeke, Belgium, panels 138 to 140, 162 to 162A and 163A. He was the son of John Hull and Ann Jane Hull of Aghalee, Lurgan, Co. Antrim.
395HullRobert JohnPvt415769RIrFIrish1510 NIHLambegLisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumOtherKIA1918-10-11 00:00:0021Dadizeele New British Cemetery, BelgiumHULL, Private Robert John. Born in Lambeg, he lived in Lisburn where he enlisted, serving in NIH (1510) before transferring to D Company 9 RIrF (41576). KIA in Belgium on the 11.10.18 aged 21, he is buried in Dadizeele New British Cemetery, Belgium, (the same cemetery as Captain W. Boomer) plot 1, row D, grave 10. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of George and Hariette Hull of 7 Eagle Terrace, Low Road, Lisburn, and brother of Lance Corporal George Hull, above, who was KIA on the 1.7.16. On the 5 July 1919 his parents had the following notice published in the Herald remembering their two dead sons. “Though their graves are apart, Their souls are not divided; Together to their Father’s home With joyful hearts they go, And dwell together with the Lord, Beyond the reach of woe”.
396HumeJosephPvt13582HLIScottishLisburnCoatbridge, LanarkFranceSommeKIA1916-07-30 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceHUME, Private Joseph. Born in Lisburn, before the war he had been employed at Hilden Mills before going to work in Scotland. He enlisted at Coatbridge, Lanarkshire and served in 2 HLI (1358). Reported MIA from the 30.6.16 and subsequently, in April or May 1917, as KIA on the Somme on the 30.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France. His father who lived at 30 Bridge Street, Lisburn inserted a notice in the Standard on the 1.9.16 asking for any information about his son. At the time of his death his sister, Miss L. Hume, was in the Home for the Blind, Cliftonville, Belfast.
397HunterWilliamRmRIRIrishLisburnHUNTER, Rifleman William. He lived on the Hillhall Road, Lisburn and served in the RIR. According to the Roll of Honour of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland, he died, but there is no trace from any other source.
398HuttonJamesRm53962RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1915-12-23 00:00:00Tancrez Farm Cemetery, BelgiumHUTTON, Rifleman James. Born in and enlisting at Lisburn, he served in 2 RIR (5396) and was KIA in Belgium on the 23.12.15. According to the Standard he had just returned to the front after 8 days leave at home following “a years hard service in France”. Buried in Tancrez Farm Cemetery, Belgium, plot 1, row G, grave 11, there is no headstone inscription. He was the brother of Miss Maggie Hutton of 64 Gregg Street, Lisburn.
399HyndmanJamesPvt412397LCSupport11 RIR 7261MalluskBelfastSuffolk, DunmurryDunmurryFranceRearDied1917-11-14 00:00:0044Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre, FranceHYNDMAN, Private James. Born in Mallusk, he lived at Suffolk, Dunmurry, enlisted at Belfast in 11 RIR (7261) and embarked with them for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Transferred to 894th. Area Employment Company Labour Corps (412397), he died in France on the 14.11.17 age 44. Buried in Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre, France, division 6, plot 1, row K, grave 8, he was the husband of Rose Hyndman of Suffolk, Dunmurry, Co. Antrim.
400IrvineSamuelRm55312RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceArrasKIA1916-04-27 00:00:0046Ecoivres Military Cemetery, Mont St. Eloy, FranceIRVINE, Rifleman Samuel. Born in Lisburn, he lived on the Low Road. An old soldier who had served in RIR before the war, he was a keen footballer and athlete. He played for the Wesley team which won the Alliance Trophy, Lisburn League and Steel and Sons’ Cup and for a time for Queens Park, Glasgow appearing for them in a friendly fixture against Linfield in Belfast before the war. Enlisting at Lisburn, he served in 2 RIR (5531). KIA in France on the 27.4.16 aged 46 he is buried in Ecoivres Military Cemetery, Mont-St. Eloy, France, plot 1, row G, grave 24. A widower, he was survived by three young children who appear to have been looked after by his parents. He was the son of the late William and Ann Irvine of 114 Fort Street, Low Road, Lisburn, Co. Antrim. His sister and brother-in-law Lizzie and Hugh Boyd lived at 112 Fort Street, and his brother and sister-in-law David and Eliza Jane Irvine at 42 Low Road. All inserted death notices in the Standard for the 26th May 1916.
401IrvineWilliamRm35769RIRIrishCulcaveyBelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0018Serre Road Cemetery No.2, FranceIRVINE, Rifleman William. Born in Culcavey, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 9 RIR (3576). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 18, he is buried in Serre Road Cemetery No. 2, plot 8, row F, grave 12.
402IrvineWilliam McCulloughRm663511RIRIrishDerriaghyLisburnLambegLambegFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0018Thiepval Memorial, FranceIRVINE, Rifleman William McCullough. Born in Derriaghy, Co. Antrim, he lived at 8 Carman’s Row, Lambeg, Lisburn and was a member of Lambeg LOL 912. He enlisted at Lisburn and served in B Company 11 RIR Lewis Gun Section (6635), embarking with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. Reported missing and subsequently, in June 1917, confirmed as having been KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 18, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval memorial, France. He was the son of William and Ellen Irvine of 8 Carman’s Row, Mosside, Lambeg, Lisburn. On the 1st. September, his father inserted a notice in the Standard asking for any information concerning his son but it was to be over nine months before he received official confirmation that he had been killed.Irvine, WilliamMcCulloughNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
403IrvineDavidRm222511RIRIrishDerriaghyCrumlinLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-08 00:00:00Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumIRVINE, Rifleman David. Born in Derriaghy, he lived at 4 Low Road, Lisburn. An apprentice in the Co-operative Society, and a former member of Railway Street Church Boys Brigade, he enlisted at Crumlin and served in 11 RIR (2225) embarking with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. He was KIA in Belgium on the 8.8.17 a few weeks after returning from home on leave, and his death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate, Memorial, panel 40. He was the son of Adam and Agnes Jane Irvine of Wilson Street, Low Road, Lisburn. Captain Lindsay, one of his officers, wrote to his mother saying, “It is with the greatest grief that I have to tell you that your son … died of wounds last Thursday. We had gone up to a forward position in the new line, and while there he was hit by a shell and died in the aid post shortly afterwards. He was a splendid boy, and very highly thought of. He has been in charge of our Company Signallers for some time and was most capable and efficient in his work. His loss is very keenly felt by us all. I feel the loss of our men terribly – how much we should like them all to get back to those who love them; but I feel there is something better for all those brave hearts. The loss is ours, the gain is theirs. Something better must be in store for them. This is a very real comforting thought, and I hope it may be a comfort to you”. Irvine, DavidNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
404IrvineJamesIRVINE, James. His death is commemorated on War Memorials at Hilden and Lambeg Parish Church. however, there is no positive trace so far.
405IrwinDavidSgt1275910RIRIrishLanarkBelfastRenfrewshireBelgiumYpresKIA1917-06-07 00:00:0021Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, Belgium
406IrwinJamesSgt18721MGC(I)SupportLanarkBelfastLambegTullynacrossBelgiumMessinesDOW1917-06-07 00:00:0024Dranoutre Military Cemetery, BelgiumIRWIN, Sergeant James. Born in Lochwinnoch, Lanark, he lived at Lambeg, and before the war was employed at Lambeg Bleachworks. A member of the Conservative Flute Band and Lambeg LOL 138, he was also well known in local football circles, and was “a great favourite with the Roseville boys”. Enlisting in Belfast he served in the RIR (248) before transferring to 109 Company MGC(I) (18721). He DoW in Belgium on the 7.6.17 aged 24 and is buried in Dranoutre Military Cemetery, Belgium, plot 1, row J, grave 40. The headstone inscription reads, “We miss him most who loved him best”. He was the son of George and Charlotte Irwin of 17 Kilnknowe Cottages, Howood, Renfrewshire, and husband of Nancy Stewart Irwin of 23 Hilden View, Tullynacross, Lambeg, Lisburn. He died the same day as his brother Sergeant David Irwin who was born in Thornlie, Lanark, enlisted at Belfast and served in 10 RIR (12759). He was KIA in Belgium on the 7.6.17 aged 21. His death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate Memorial, Belgium, panel 40. After the war on the 7 June 1919, James Irwin’s wife Nancy had the following In Memoriam notice published in the Herald. ”Though death divides, Loving memory clings. Ever remembered by his loving wife and little daughter”. A week later on the 14th the following appeared in the same paper, inserted by the two brothers’ parents in Scotland. “In loving memory of our dear sons Sgts. James and David Irwin who were KIA in France on June 7, 1917. Sweet is their memory, dear to our hearts; My love to their memory never shall part; I know that the years be they many or few, are years of remembrance, dear sons, of you”.Irwin, JamesNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
407IrwinJohnPvt212501RInFIrishSt. Patrick's, Co. ArmaghBelfastLisburnBelgiumOtherKIA1918-10-22 00:00:00Harlebeke New British Cemetery, BelgiumIRWIN, Private John. Born in St. Patrick’s, Co. Armagh, he lived in Lisburn, enlisted at Belfast and served in LR (2412) before transferring to 1 RIrF (21250). Reported wounded in September 1917 he was KIA in Belgium on the 22.10.18, he is buried in Harlebeke New British Cemetery, Harelbeke, Belgium, plot 8, row B, grave 5.
408Irwin(Duggan)JamesRm210027RIRIrishDunmurryLondonDunmurryDunmurryFranceLensKIA1916-08-06 00:00:0022Vermelles British Cemetery, FranceIRWIN Rifleman James. Served as James Duggan. Born and living in Dunmurry, he enlisted at London and served in 7 RIR (7/8557). KIA in France on the 6.8.16 age 22, he is buried in Vermelles British Cemetery, (10 kilometres north-west of Lens), Pas de Calais, France, plot 3, row L, grave 23. He was the son of James and Mary Ann Irwin of 19 Mill Row, Dunmurry. There is no indication from the evidence as to why he served under an assumed name. Unlike Frederick John Fenton (above) he would not have been under-age. If he had joined up in August 1914 he would have been at least 19 and probably 20.
409JacksonIsaiahPvt199561RInFIrishLisburnBelfastLisburnLisburnTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-08-21 00:00:0017Helles Memorial, GallipoliJACKSON, Private Isaiah. Born and living in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RInF (19956). KIA in Gallipoli on the 21.8.15 aged 17, his death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panels 97-101. He was the third son of Joseph and Mary Jackson of 53 Mercer Street, Lisburn. They inserted the following poem with a death notice in the Herald on the 25 August 1917. “We will say nothing, ‘tis good God wills, Though he sleeps in silence ‘neath Turkish Hills; Yet a proud and yearning memory dwells, For that silent sleeper in the Dardanelles”.
410JeffersonJamesRm19210RIRIrishBlarisBelfastBelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-06-19 00:00:0035Hamel Military Cemetery, FranceJEFFERSON, Rifleman James. Born in Blaris, Co. Down, he was a “prominent Orangeman and Unionist in the Derriaghy district,” he played in the Derriaghy Flute Band and was employed at the gas-stove department of Belfast Corporation at the Ormeau Road works. Enlisting at Belfast, he served in D Company 10 RIR 192. KIA in France on the 19.6.16 aged 35, he is buried in Hamel Military Cemetery, France, plot 1, row A, grave 31. There is no headstone inscription but rather unusually the headstone gives his full Christian name James rather than just his initial J. He was the second son of William and Jane Jefferson of Mosside, Dunmurry, husband of Jane Jefferson of 5 Reformatory Avenue, Lisburn Road, Balmoral, Belfast, and father of their four children.
411JenkinsGarrett Primrose2LtC Bty 75BrigRFASupportLisburnWinchesterBelgiumPoperingheKIA1917-09-07 00:00:0019Canada Farm Cemetery, BelgiumJENKINS, 2nd. Lieutenant Garratt Primrose. Born on the 30.11.1897, he was an old scholar of Friends’ School, Lisburn which he entered on 3.5.05. There, his reports record his conduct and work as either “satisfactory” or “excellent”. He left FSL on the 26.7.07 and was subsequently educated at Winchester School. Gazetted to the artillery from the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich in August 1916, he served in C Battery, 75 Brigade, RFA. KIA in Belgium on the 7.9.17 aged 19, he is buried in Canada Farm Cemetery, Belgium, plot 3, row B, grave 9. The headstone inscription reads, “Of Lisburn Co. Antrim”. He was the eldest son of Alys Jenkins and Major Adam Primrose Jenkins of the firm of W.J. Jenkins & Co., Bedford Street, Belfast, Seymour Street, Lisburn and Morestead Grove, Winchester.

Major Adam Jenkins his father, was also a member of Lisburn Urban Council and the Commanding Officer of the 1st. Lisburn battalion of the UVF which he had been instrumental in setting up. He had received his commission as a Captain in 11 RIR on the 14 September 1914 and according to the Standard, “it was thanks chiefly to his manly lead that such a splendid percentage of members [of Lisburn UVF] joined the army at the outbreak of the war”. His services to the Ulster Volunteers and to the Unionist cause in general, were recognized in January 1915 with the presentation of a dress sword and compass by the members of 1st Lisburn Battalion of the UVF. Promoted to Major, he embarked for France from Bordon camp in October 1915 even though he could have avoided overseas service on account of his age and health. “That”, reported the Standard, “was not Major Jenkins’ way. He … would ask no man to go where he would not go himself”.

He served in France until July 1st 1916 when, as commander of A Company, he was reported as KIA. However, this subsequently proved to be incorrect. He had in fact been wounded and taken prisoner, and was held by the Germans in the Gutersloch Camp, Westphalia. This was the same camp as Captain Craig the local M.P. who was also wounded and captured on the 1.7.16. His wife received a letter from him in August 1916 in which he described how he, “was wounded in the head, and must have lain for two days in the German trenches before being picked up by a Red Cross Orderly. Of course I have only a shadowy recollection of all this. The nurses and doctors here are very kind. My doctor is a charming man, and I shall never forget his kindness. My wound was a very bad one, but it is getting all right now. How I escaped with my life is a marvelous thing”.

In August 1918 after his repatriation his view of Germans was not quite so generous. “When I was in Germany”, he wrote, “I was in an officers prison camp, and had it not been for the parcels of food sent by my wife, I would undoubtedly have starved. Not only did we not get enough to eat, but the quality of what little we did get was so bad that we could not eat it. If officers were treated like this, you can imagine how the poor men must suffer. … I’m glad to say that we always received the parcels that were sent to us. This was about the only descent thing the Germans did”.

Released by the Germans in December 1916 on account of his wounds, he spent the next nine months recuperating in Switzerland. His wife visited him there in July 1917. On the 8 September he left Switzerland reaching England on about the 12th to be greeted by the news of his son’s death which had taken place five days earlier. Arriving in Belfast on the 6 October, he paid a short visit to Lisburn two days later on the 8th. The following Easter, 1918, a private service was held in Lisburn cathedral on Good Friday at which the Lord Primate dedicated a tablet to Garratt Jenkins memory. Three years later in February 1921 Adam Jenkins unveiled the war memorial in Christ Church. Garrett Jenkins name appears fourth on the list.
Jenkins, GarrattPrimrosePat Geary/FindAGrave.com
412JeremyFrederick PatrickPvt74512RInFIrishH'boroBelfastH'boroBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1914-10-21 00:00:0032Ploegsteert Memorial, BelgiumJEREMY, Private Frederick. Born in Hillsborough, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 2 RInF (7451). KIA in Belgium on the 21.10.14 aged 32, his death is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium, panel 5. He was the son of Robert and Margaret Jeremy of Hillsborough, Co. Down.
413JessGeorgeRm46012RIRIrishH'boroBallymenaH'boroFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0024Ancre British Cemetery, Beaumont-Hamel,FranceJESS, Rifleman George. Born in Hillsborough, with an address at Arnold Bridge, just to the south west of the village, he enlisted at Ballymena and served in 12 RIR (460). KIA in France on the 1.7.16 aged 24, he is buried in Ancre British Cemetery, Beaumont-Hamel, France, plot 2, row D, grave 36. The headstone inscription reads, “Thy will be done”. He was the son of Mrs. Matilda Jess of of Arnold Bridge and/or Ballykeel Artifinney, Hillsborough, Co. Down.
414JessWilliam GeorgeRm10198RIRIrishH'boroBelfastHomeBelfastDOW1916-07-12 00:00:00Dundonald Cemetery, BelfastJESS, Rifleman William George. Born in Hillsborough, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 8 RIR (1019). He DoW at “home” on the 12.7.16 and is buried in Dundonald Cemetery, Belfast, grave F6, 662. He was the son of Robert and Agnes Jess.
415JessJosephRm15671RIRIrishH'boroBelfastDrumloughDromoreBelgiumOtherKIA1918-10-21 00:00:0029Harlebeke New British Cemetery, BelgiumJESS, Rifleman Joseph. Born in Hillsborough, he lived at Drumlough, enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RIR (1567). KIA in Belgium on the 21.10.18 aged 29, he is buried in Harlebeke New British Cemetery, Belgium, plot 8, row D, grave 11. He was the son of John and Mary Jane Jess of Dromore, Co. Down
416JohnstonWilliam JohnPvt57981DCLIEnglishLisburnBelfastLisburnFranceAisne/MarneKIA1914-09-09 00:00:00La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre Memorial, FranceJOHNSTON, Private William John. Born and living in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 DCLI (5798). KIA in France on the 9.9.14, his death is commemorated on the La Ferte-Souse-Jouarre Memorial, France. It is on the Marne about 20 Km. east of Meaux and commemorates those killed in the fighting from August to early September, who have no known grave. Joseph Hanna, George Neill and Robert Smeaton who were all in 2 RIR and were killed on the 19th and 20th September are also commemorated there.
417JohnstonJoseph ARm112466RIRIrishLisburnBelfastBelfastTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-08-11 00:00:00Helles Memorial, GallipoliJOHNSTON, Rifleman Joseph A. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 6 RIR (11246). KIA in Gallipoli on the 11.8.15, his death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli. He was the brother of Mary Johnston of 176 Cambrai Street, Belfast.
418JohnstonAlexanderRm110096RIRIrishLisburnLisburnBelfastTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-08-22 00:00:00Helles Memorial, GallipoliJOHNSTON, Rifleman Alexander. Born in Lisburn, he lived in Belfast, enlisted at Lisburn and served in 6 RIR (11009). KIA in Gallipoli on the 22.8.15, his death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panels 177-8.
419JohnstonMargaret HessieStaff NurseQAIMNSRSupportBallinderry UpperEmsworth, HantsBallinderry UpperBallinderry UpperEgyptCairoDied/typhoid1915-09-05 00:00:0030Cairo War Memorial Cemetery, EgyptJOHNSTON, Staff Nurse Margaret (Maggie) Hessie. JOHNSTON, Staff Nurse Margaret (Maggie) Hessie. CoI. Born on the 19 April 1885 at Clonterriff, Upper Ballinderry, Co. Antrim, the family home, she was educated at Upper Ballinderry National School and became a member of Lisburn Young Womans Association. She lived for a time at the YWCA Home in Wallace Avenue in the town before beginning her training as a nurse at Staffordshire General Infirmary in April 1905. This lasted for three years before she moved to Essex County Nursing Home, Colchester in May 1908. Working as a Staff Nurse, she also took on Sisters duties during holidays and, at least according to the Standard, worked at some point as a district nurse. After nearly a year and a half in Colchester she moved to the Biblewomans and Nurses Mission in Russell Square, London in Sept 1909 working there until July 1911. She then moved overseas as a church missionary working at the International Hospital in Adana in Turkey between January 1912 and January 1914.

With the outbreak of war she volunteered for service and took up duties at Northlands Red Cross Hospital, Emsworth, near Portsmouth. On the 3 March the following year though she applied to join Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service Reserve, noting in her application that she had considerable experience nursing those suffering from Enteric fever. Not surprisingly for someone of her experience, her application was quickly approved; she was “warned” for Egypt on the 21st and the following month was posted to R Section QAIMNS at the Citadel Military Hospital, Cairo. At the time of her application to join the QAs, it was reported that she was “in good health and fit for foreign service”, however, this was not to last. Only a few months after going overseas she fell ill. According to the Standard, Colonel Naggs the CO at the Citadel had her brought to his own quarters and “everything possible was done for her but it was all no good”. She died from enteric fever/paratyphoid in Egypt on the 5 September 1915 aged 30. A service was held in the hospital chapel attended by Sir John Maxwell who commanded the troops in Egypt and his ADC Prince Alex of Battenberg. She was buried with full military honours in Cairo War Memorial Cemetery, row D, grave 84.

Margaret Johnston’s death is commemorated on the family headstone in Ballinderry Middle church graveyard, on the Roll of Honour in the Parish Church, the memorial to Irish nurses in St. Anne’s Church of Ireland Cathedral, Belfast and the memorial to Irish nurses in the Arbour Hill Garrison Church, Dublin. The family headstone records that she, “gave her life in the Great War”. Margaret Johnston was the daughter of Edward Johnston, a farmer, and Mrs Johnston of Clonterriff, Upper Ballinderry, Co. Antrim. She died single and intestate with an estate valued at £85.11.5 gross.
420JohnstonDavid WilliamsonRm1797913RIRIrishLambegComberLisburnLambegFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0022Thiepval Memorial, FranceJOHNSTON, Rifleman David Williamson. Born in Lambeg, he lived at Lisburn, enlisted at Comber and served in 13 RIR (17979). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 22, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, faces A/B. He was the son of Hugh Johnston of Tullynacross, Lambeg, Lisburn, Co. Antrim.
421JohnstonHenryLcpl1499310RIRIrishShankillBelfastBelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceJOHNSTON Lcpl. Henry. Born Shankill, enlisted Belfast he served in 10RIR (14993). KIA on the Somme on the 1.07.16 aged 31. His death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France pier and face 15A and B and also by his sister Annie on the family headstone in Hillhall Presbyterian churchyard though not on the war memorial there. He was the son of Andrew and Catherine Johnston of 231 Donegall Road, Belfast who are both buried in Hillhall Presbyterian churchyard. His mother died on the 7.06.1903 and his father on the 17.08.23.
422JohnstonJamesRm129608RIRIrishCarrickavea, Co. DOWnBelfastBallylessonFranceSommeKIA1916-07-02 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceJOHNSTON, Rifleman James. Born at Carrickavea, Co. Down, he lived in Ballylesson, enlisted at Belfast and served in 8 RIR (12960). KIA on the Somme on the 2.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15A and B.
423JohnstonWilliam JohnRm1797413RIRIrishH'boroLisburnH'boroH'boroFranceRear/SommeDOW1916-07-10 00:00:0019St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, FranceJOHNSTON, Rifleman William John. Born and living in Hillsborough, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 13 RIR (17974). Wounded on the Somme, possibly on the 1st July, he DoW in France on the 10.7.16 aged 19. Buried in St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, France, plot A, row 25, grave 15, he was the son of William Johnston of Hillsborough, Co. Down.
424JohnstonDavidPvt13786MGC(I)SupportRIR 6287Clandeboye CampLisburn/CrumlinPortadownFranceSommeKIA1916-11-18 00:00:0018Thiepval Memorial, FranceJOHNSTON, Private David. He lived at Lisburn and Crumlin and enlisted in the RIR (6287) at Clandeboye Camp. Subsequently transferred to the 97 Co. MGC (Infantry), he was reported missing and later KIA on the Somme on the 16.11.16 aged 18. His death is commemorated on the Thiepval memorial, France, pier and face 5C and 12C. He was the son of James Johnston of 17 Union Street, Portadown, Co. Armagh. Johnston, DavidNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
425JohnstonJoseph AllenCpt9RIrFIrishLurganLurganBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1917-02-18 00:00:0025St. Quentin Cabaret Military Cemetery, Ploegsteert, BelgiumJOHNSTON, Captain Joseph Allen. Born on the 2.5.1891, he may have lived in Lurgan but was educated at Friend’s School, Lisburn which he entered on the 3.9.02. With one exception, his reports there were generally “very satisfactory”. He left FSL on the 26.7.1907 to go to Campbell College and subsequently served in 9 RIrF. He was KIA in Belgium on the 18.2.17 aged 25 “by a sniper’s bullet which pierced his heart, death” according to the Standard, “being instantaneous”. He is buried in St. Quentin Cabaret Military Cemetery, Ploegsteert, Belgium. The fourth son of James Johnston JP, “a Lisburn gentleman” according to the Herald, and Christina Johnston of Lurgan, Co. Armagh, he was a cousin of Thomas Johnston a chemist of Market Square, Lisburn. Two of his brothers also saw active service. Johnston, JosephAllenILC&LM
426JohnstonAlfredPvt1742SIHIrishH'boro1917-05-14 00:00:00JOHNSTON, Private Alfred. Born in Hillsborough, he served in the SIH (1742) and died on the 14.5.17. The details here concerning service number, regiment and date of death are the same as for James Edward Bentley, see above. Could Bentley have served under an assumed name?
427JohnstonArthurPvt28871RM batt RNDivRMLINavyLurgan/StirlingFranceCambrai1918-10-08 00:00:0023Proville British Cemetery, Nord, FranceJOHNSTON, Arthur. Born on the 24.2.1895, he was an Old scholar of Friends’ School, Lisburn. His stay at FSL was brief, lasting from the 4.9.06 to the 21.12.06. The single report on him dated 21.12.06 reads, “Arthur possesses considerable ability, and has shown a good deal of improvement during the term; but his frequent absences from school have prevented him from properly settling down to his work, and deriving all the benefits that might have been expected”. His parents were James and Christina Johnston whose home was in Lurgan. The closest fit is Private A.M. Johnston (CH/2887S) 1st. R.M. battalion Royal Naval Division, RMLI. Died on the 8.10.18 age 23. Buried in Proville British Cemetery, Nord, France, plot 1, row C, grave 30. He was the son of John and Christina Monteith Johnston of 19 Ship Haugh, Stirling.
428JohnstonGeorgeJOHNSTON, George. His death is commemorated on Hilden War Memorial but there is no positive trace so far.
429Johnston-SmythEdwardChpACDSupportGlenavyGlenavy/CanterburyFranceRearDied1917-02-10 00:00:0044St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, FranceJOHNSON-SMYTH, Chaplain 4th Class, The Rev. Edward. Born in Glenavy, Co. Antrim, he was educated at Trinity College, Dublin and was ordained in 1895. Officiating curate of St. Crispin’s, Bermondsey from then until 1897 when he moved to St. Thomas’s in Birmingham. The following year he went to India as the Church Missionary Society’s missionary at Multan and in 1908 was transferred to Srinigar, Kashmir in the Diocese of Lahore. Appointed as an acting army chaplain on the 8.8.16, he was posted to France, where he served in the Army Chaplains’ Department. He died in Rouen, France on the 10.2.17 age 44, and is buried in St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, plot B, row 4, grave 11. He was the husband of Mrs. M. S. Johnson-Smyth of “Pawa Domus”, Cherry Garden Road, Canterbury, and only son of Maud and the late Thomas Johnson-Smyth, J.P. of Goremount, Glenavy, Co. Antrim.
430KaneSamuelRm1704713RIRIrishH'boroBelfastCulcaveyFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceKANE, Rifleman Samuel. Born in Hillsborough, he lived at Culcavey, Hillsborough, enlisted at Belfast and served in 13 RIR (17047). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, faces A/B. Kane, SamuelNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
431KaneJamesSg/tCpl1799712RIRIrishBelfastLisburnHillsborough/BelfastBelfastFranceBelgian borderKIA1918-08-25 00:00:0026Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceKANE, Sergeant James. Born in Belfast where he lived for a time, he also lived at Lisburn Street, Hillsborough, and was a member of the local UVF battalion in Hillsborough. He enlisted at Lisburn and served in 12 RIR (17997). KIA in France on the 25.8.18 aged 26, he is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, France, (close to the Franco-Belgian border), plot 3, row F, grave 109. The headstone inscription reads, “Peace perfect peace”. He was the husband of Charlotte Kane of 262 Conway Street and later 65 Hudson Street, Belfast.
432KaneJRm73618RIRIrishKinallen, DromaraKinallen, DromaraHomeDromaraDied1920-05-29 00:00:0038Dromara First Presbyterian Churchyard, Co. DOWnKANE, Rifleman J. Born in Kinallen, Dromara, he served in 18 RIR (736) and died at “home” on the 29.5.20 age 38. Buried in Dromara First Presbyterian Churchyard, grave 317, he was the son of James and Jane Kane and husband of Elizabeth Kane of Kinallen, Dromara.
433KeenanGeorge ClementsRm150549RIRIrishBallymacarrettBelfastLisburnBelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-07-02 00:00:0029Thiepval Memorial, FranceKEENAN, Rifleman George Clements. Born in Ballymacarret, Belfast, he lived in Lisburn, enlisted at Belfast and served in 9 RIR (15054). Reported wounded and missing in late August/ early September and subsequently KIA on the Somme on the 2.7.16 age 29, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A and B. He was the son of Annie Keenan of 94 Dover Street, Belfast and the late George C. Keenan.
434KeeryIsaacRm666011RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLisburnLisburnHome/ManchesterLisburnDOW1916-07-20 00:00:00Blaris Old Cemetery, LisburnKEERY, Rifleman Isaac. Born in Blaris, he lived in Longstone Street, Lisburn. A bricklayer by trade, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 11 RIR (6660). Wounded on the Somme on the 1.7.16 he DoW at Manchester on the 20.7.16. His wife who lived at 26 Pump Lane, was informed of his death that day by telegram. His remains were brought back to Lisburn on the 22nd and he was buried in Blaris Old Cemetery, Co. Down, grave 753 on Sunday 23.7.16.
435KeightleyPhilip Charles RussellCpt262RGASupportLisburnLisburnDrumbegHomeDrumbegDied1919-03-02 00:00:0024Drumbeg Parish Church, Co.Antrim.KEIGHTLEY, Captain Philip Charles Russell. Born in Lisburn on the 24.1.1895, the family home was Drum House, Drumbeg. He was an old scholar of Friends’ School, Lisburn which he entered on the 18.1.04. His school reports show his work and conduct there were generally “very satisfactory” but his progress was hampered by frequent absences due to illness. A member of Lisburn Cricket Club and Lisnagarvey Hockey Club, he played hockey for County Antrim and for Ulster in the inter-Provincial tournament. He entered Trinity College Dublin in 1913 where he became a member of the OTC and was commissioned into the Special Reserve of officers. Posted to the RGA at Plymouth, he arrived in France in September 1915 and was to serve there and in Belgium throughout the war, finishing his career with 262nd. Siege Battery, RGA. The first 15 months were spent in the Ypres Salient and “during the remainder of his brief life he looked back on this time as a terrible nightmare through which he had passed”. Home on leave in April 1916 he was posted to Cambrai early in 1917 where he lived “a charmed life, for while his battery was decimated he himself escaped without a scratch”. Promoted to Captain in January 1919, he was at home on a short leave when he died of pneumonia on the 2.3.19 “after an illness lasting only a few days”. He was 24 years old and was buried in grave 314, St. Patrick’s (Church of Ireland) graveyard, Drumbeg, beside Drum House. Russell Keightley was the eldest son of Sir Samuel Robert Keightley KT, M.A., LLD. and Lady Mary? Keightley of Drum House, Drumbeg and “The Fort,” Lisburn. He seems to have been very close to his mother. “During the three years he served in France there never passed a single day in which he did not write to [her]. Filial love could go no further”. Chairman of the Lisburn Board of Guardians, she took a keen interest in childrens’ welfare. She died on the 31.10.29 aged 65 and was buried in the same grave as her son. Sir Samuel, whose barristers practice was at Fort House in Lisburn, may be buried abroad, perhaps in Egypt. Their youngest son Lieutenant Maurice F. Keightly, passed the qualifying exam for the Indian army and on the 27.6.16 was due to leave for Quetta in India for six months preliminary training as a cadet before being commissioned. He appears to have survived the war. Towards the end of 1919 Russell Keightley’s war time experiences based on his letters home were published by Victor McMurray (Belfast and Lisburn), under the title “Among the Guns”. Keightley, PhillipCharlesRussellPat Geary/Among the Guns
436KellyWilliam JamesPvt3091DepotRIrRIrish6 RIrR?LisburnBelfastLisburnHomeLisburnDied1917-07-25 00:00:00Trinity Terrace Cemetery, LisburnKELLY, Private William James. Born and living in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in the RIrR Depot and 6 RIrR (3091). He died at “home” on the 25.7.17 and is buried in Trinity Terrace R.C. Graveyard, Lisburn.
437KellyEdwardQMS683201ChREnglishDCLI 22507LisburnWoolwichIlfordLisburnFranceOtherKIA1918-10-23 00:00:0019Amerval Communal Cemetery Extension, Solesmes, FranceKELLY, (Quarter Master) Sergeant Edward. Born in Lisburn, he was serving his apprenticeship as a law clerk at Mr. D.Barbour Simpson’s office Lisburn? when the war broke out. He enlisted in 11 RIR, possibly along with his brother William, but was “claimed off” (taken out of the army) by his parents, probably because he was underage. However, he re-enlisted later at Woolwich, by which time he was living at Ilford, Essex, his parents on this occasion, “offering no objection”. He rose quickly through the ranks and by the time of his departure for the front he may have been the youngest sergeant in the army. He went to France on the 17 April 1916 aged 17, and served in the DCLI (22507) before transferring to 1 ChR (68320). The day before his departure, Major E.A. Belcher, second in command of his battalion, had written to Mrs. Kelly, “Your son Edward leaves with a draft for the front tomorrow. I did not like his going at all, but as you have offered no objection on the score of age, and he has never ceased begging that he might be sent, I feel no one could stand in the way. … He will do well at the front, for though he is probably the youngest sergeant in the British army, he has courage and common sense. Throughout all his training here and his association with men of varied character and disposition he has retained the freshness of youth and a sterling honesty and straightness which has endeared him to us all. I am sure his mother would like to know that the good training he must have had in his Irish home has borne such good fruit and is now to be given to the service of his country. I shall always be very interested, both during the war and afterwards, to hear how he gets on, and if he ever gets wounded I hope you will let me know at once”. He was wounded in August 1916 in the early stages of the Battle of the Somme. However, his injuries were light and he recovered after being treated in Mile End Military Hospital in London. KIA in France on the 23.10.18 less than three weeks before the end of the war. He was 19 or 20 years of age. At the meeting of Lisburn Urban Council on the 4 November 1918, Mr. Scott, referring to his age observed that, “the first trousers he ever wore were khaki”. Edward Kelly is buried in Amerval Communal Cemetery Extension, Solesmes, France, plot 28, row D. He was the son of William Kelly of 2 Ballynahinch Road, Lisburn, Four of his brothers also served in the armed forces. Sergeant James Kelly in the RFA, Sergeant William Kelly in the RIR, who was probably wounded in August 1917, and Tom and Sergeant John Kelly with the Canadian Army. John Kelly who had been a law clerk at D.B. Simpson’s office before he emigrated, served with the Canadian Mounted Rifles after the Great War was over. He was awarded the M.M. in 1920, possibly in Russia, “for conspicuous gallantry whilst engaged with a special raiding party”. In addition, a nephew of William Kelly, Private Thomas Henry Kelly who had been born in Australia and enlisted at Ayr, Queensland, served in the 47 A.I., A.I.F (2292). He had spent a short leave in Lisburn during Christmas 1916 and was KIA in Belgium on the 7.6.17 aged 17. His death, which was notified to his uncle in Lisburn by the Australian Record Office, is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium, Panels 7 to 31. His widowed father lived at Ashgrove Farm, Lower Burdekin, Queensland. Kelly, EdwardPat Geary/Standard 04.08.16
438KennedyJamesRm1665814RIRIrishGlenavyBelfastGlenavyFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0026Thiepval Memorial, FranceKENNEDY, Rifleman James. Born in Glenavy, Co. Antrim, where he was a member of the Orange Order, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 14 RIR (16658). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 age 26, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A and B. He was the son of Elizabeth and the late John Kennedy of Glenavy, Co. Antrim.
439KennedyCampbellCpl112836RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLambegLisburnGreeceSalonikaKIA1917-05-16 00:00:00Struma Military Cemetery, GreeceKENNEDY, Corporal Campbell. Born in Lisburn and living in Lambeg, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 6 RIR (11283). Involved in the landings at Sulva Bay on the Gallipoli peninsula, he was wounded in the fighting at Chocolate Hill. KIA in Salonika on the 16.5.17 he is buried in Struma Military Cemetery, Greece, plot 7, row B, grave 4. He was the third son of Alexander and Sarah Kennedy of 11 Lambeg Road, Lisburn. On the 29 December 1916 a letter from him written in Salonica, to the secretary of the Hilden-Lambeg Work Association appeared in the Standard. In it he thanked them for comforts he had received. “Just a few lines to thank you and all the workers of the Hilden-Lambeg Association for the parcel especially the cigarettes and cocoa, and also socks. You just seem to know what we need here and as it is from Lisburn, we always welcome it more when we know we are not forgotten by those we have left behind”. Exactly a month after he was killed, a death notice published in the Herald at the request of his parents included the following poem, “I loved him in secret, I loved him for years, For him came my smile, for him fell my tears; But sorrow and suffering will shade my brow, For his memory is all that is left for me now. But the hardest part is yet to come, When the heroes do return, And I miss among the cheering crowd, The face of my dear loved son”.
440KerrAlexanderRm623712RIRIrishKinallenClandeboyeVancouver BCBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1916-10-16 00:00:00La Plus Douve Farm Cemetery, Ploegsteert, BelgiumKERR, Rifleman Alexander. Born in Kinallen, Co. Down, he lived in Vancouver British Columbia and Skeagh, west of Kinallen in Co. Down. He enlisted at Clandeboye and served in 12 RIR (6237). KIA in Belgium on the 16.10.16, he is buried in Le Plus Douve Farm Cemetery, Belgium, plot 4, row A, grave 9.
441KiddGeorgeRm1802411RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceKIDD, Rifleman George. Born in Lisburn where he lived at 12 Hill Street, he was a member of the UVF. He enlisted in the town and served in B Company 11 RIR (18024). Reported missing and subsequently, in June 1917, confirmed as having been KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15 face A/B. Kidd, GeorgeNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
442KingGeorgePvt67752SLREnglishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceParisDOW1914-09-23 00:00:00Villeneuve-St.Georges Old Communal Cemetery, FranceKING, Private George. Born and living in Lisburn, he was a reservist and a damask weaver at James Coulson’s. He left Lisburn on the 4 August and served in 2 SLR (6775). Involved in the fighting at Mons, the subsequent retreat and the fighting on the Aisne, he DoW in France on the 23.9.14 the day after he was caught in a shell explosion. According to the Standard, he was the first Lisburn man to be killed, although Private Joseph Hanna had died three days earlier and Private William John Johnston 1 DCLI was KIA on the 9.9.14. (See above). A married man with two young children, on his death, they were looked after by his aunt, Miss King of Seymour Street, who was their “custodian”. George King is buried in Villeneuve-St.Georges Old Communal Cemetery, France, row 1, grave 736. Villeneuve-St Georges is 18 kilometres south-east of the centre of Paris on the Paris-Melun road. The majority of the 1914-18 war casualties commemorated or buried there died in 1914 when the railway station was on the British lines of communication and a British ambulance was posted there.King, GeorgePat Geary/Standard 1914.10.16
443KingFrederick Cross2LtMGCSupport17 RIRLisburnLisburn/LondonFranceSommeKIA/PoW?1916-10-23 00:00:0033Bancourt British Cemetery, FranceKING, 2nd. Lieutenant Frederick Cross. Educated at Oundle, before the war, he lived in Lisburn, where he was a member of the Cricket Club, and practiced as an architect in Royal Avenue, Belfast. Commissioned into 17 RIR in November 1915, he was attached to 25 Company MGC. He was KIA on the Somme on the 23.10.16 aged 33 and is buried in Bancourt British Cemetery, France, plot 6 row J, grave 10. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of the late Alexander King of Ardvara, Cultra a coal importer. During his training at Grantham in August 1915, he had married Anne Jane Wilson. She was the youngest daughter of the late Robert Wilson of Courtrai, Belgium and Mrs. Wilson of 23 Seymour Street, Lisburn and later lived at Ladbrooke Square, London. Bancourt where Frederick King is buried is just outside Bapaume which was behind the German line in 1916. It is possible that his body was not found until later and that he was buried there after the area was occupied by the British.King, FrederickCrossNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
444KingsburryGeorgeSap57626RESupportEnniskillenBelfastLisburnLisburnFranceBelgian borderDOW1916-11-11 00:00:00Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceKINGSBURRY, Sapper George. Born in Enniskillen, he lived at Lisburn, enlisted at Belfast and served in 122 Field Company RE (57626). He DoW in a “clearing hospital” in France on the 11.11.16 and is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, France, (close to Franco-Belgian border), plot 3, row A, grave 230. There is no headstone inscription. He was the husband of Sarah Kingsbury of the Low Road, Lisburn.
445KingsmorePatrickPvt206528RInFIrishCR 3686BelfastDunmurryFranceLensDOW1916-04-29 00:00:00Bethune Town Cemetery, France KINGSMORE, Private Patrick. He lived in Dunmurry, enlisted at Belfast and served in the CR (3686) before transferring to 8 RInF (20652). He DoW in France on the 29.4.16 and is buried in Bethune Town Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France plot 3, row H, grave 76.
446KirkpatrickJohn ParkerCSM1103005CEF CMR QRImperialKilleanMontrealMontrealMontreal/CrumlinFranceArrasKIA1916-09-15 00:00:0039Vimy Memorial, FranceKIRPATRICK, Company Sergeant Major John Parker. Born in Killean, Co. Antrim on the 13 July 1877, he served in the 17 battalion of the Imperial Yeomanry. Having emigrated to Canada where he worked as a salesman and lived with his wife Violet at 14 4th Avenue, Verdun, Montreal, he enlisting at Montreal on the 4 February 1915 aged 37 years and 7 months. 5’ 9¾” tall, he had a 36” chest with 3” range of expansion, fair complexion, brown eyes, red hair and a cut on the right side of his face. Passed fit for overseas service, he served in 5 CMR QR 110300. KIA in France on the 15.9.16 aged 39, his death is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial, Pas de Calais, France and on the family headstone in Glenavy Parish church. He was the second son of Arthur and Janette Kirkpatrick of Crumlin who had died before the war (on the 24.11.1907 aged 82, and the 24.11.1896 aged 61 respectively) and who are buried in the gaveyard at Glenavy Parish church.
447KirkwoodThomas JohnPvt54852RAMCSupportLisburnHomeBelfastDied1915-03-23 00:00:00Belfast City CemeteryKIRKWOOD, Private Thomas John (Jack). He lived in Lisburn, where he was employed by the Board of Guardians as relieving officer for Lisburn Union. Released from his work on Tuesday the 16 March 1915 so that he could join up, he enlisted in the RAMC (54852) on Wednesday the 18th. However, that evening he had broken his leg and was taken to the Military Hospital in Belfast after having been treated initially in Lisburn Infirmary. He died in Belfast on the 23.3.15 as a result of his injury, news of his death arrived in Lisburn at the time the Board of Guardians were meeting to appoint a temporary replacement. He was buried with military honours in Belfast City Cemetery, row C2, grave 160 on Thursday 25 March. The coffin, draped in the Union flag, was carried on a gun carriage escorted by a firing party from the RIR and the band of the Young Citizen Volunteers (14 RIR).

On the 9 April 1915 a letter was published in the Standard from Riflemen R. Smith, Sharkey, Cree and Brown 1 RIR and Private Love of the East Lancs, expressing their sympathy to his parents. They had been involved in the fighting at Neuve Chapelle and had heard of Jack Kirkwood’s death from the paper which had been sent out to them at the front.

He was the only son of Thomas Kirkwood of 43 Dunluce Avenue, Belfast who had previously lived for a considerable time at Clonevin Park, Lisburn. The grandson of John Kirkwood of Magheralave, Lisburn, his uncles Alex and Hugh Kirkwood lived at Magheralave and Clonevin Park, Lisburn. His father, who had worked in a range of businesses in Belfast, had set himself up there as a timber merchant and broker in Victoria Street. According to the Standard was “a great temperance advocate and a devout Christian”. He was also a mason and an elder in 1st. Lisburn Presbyterian Church in which he set up and ran a Company of the Boys Brigade. He died on the 12.2.17 and, like his son, was buried in Belfast City Cemetery.
448KitchenChristopherCpl814892CEF EORImperialGloucesterWinnipegH'boroBelgiumYpresKIA1917-11-06 00:00:0027Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumKITCHEN, Corporal Christopher. Born in Gloucester on the 22.6.1890, he was a farmer and had served in the Strathcona Horse. A single man at the time of his enlistment, he joined up in Winnipeg on the 15.12.14 aged 24 years and 5 months. 5’ 7 ½” tall, he had a 39” chest with a 3” range of expansion. His complexion was described as “fleshy” and he had brown eyes and dark brown hair. He had a scar on the index finger of his left hand and one on his forehead. He served in 2 CI, EOR (81489) and was KIA in Belgium on the 6.11.17 aged 27. His death is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memoria, Belgium, Panels 10 – 28. He was also commemorated on the Roll of Honour for Hillsborough Parish Church published in the Standard on the 28.12.17 although he is not now mentioned on the War Memorial in the church itself. The son of Mrs. William Kitchen of Clonella, Manitoba and husband of Mrs. Kitchen of Park Lane Hillsborough, presumably, because he was single when he enlisted, he was married sometime between December 1914 and November 1917. Kitchen, ChristopherNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
449KnoxUchtred Charles GuyPvt770477CEF BCRImperialH'boroVictoria B.C.Victoria B.C.FranceRearSuicide1915-08-19 00:00:0025Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre, FranceKNOX, Private Uchtred Charles Guy. Born in Hillsborough, Co. Down on the 7.5.1890, he was a single man and clerk by profession. He enlisted at Victoria in British Columbia on the 7.11.1914 aged 24 years and 7 months. 5’ 9’’ in height, he had a 42’’ chest with 2’’ expansion, a fair complexion, green eyes and light coloured hair. He was in the Militia, belonging to the 88th Regiment V[ictoria] Fusiliers, and volunteered to be posted overseas where he served in 7 CI BCR 77047. He died in France on the 19.8.15 age 25 and is buried in Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre, France, plot 19, row H, grave 9. He was the son of Mrs. Knox of 1817 Bank Street, Victoria, and brother of George W. Knox of 1529 Fort Street, Victoria.
450KnoxCharlesGnr71956RHASupport71956 RFA?BelfastBelfastLisburnFranceSommeDOW1916-09-16 00:00:00Longueval Road Cemetery, FranceKNOX, Gunner Charles. Born in Belfast, he lived at Lisburn, possibly Lambeg, enlisted at Belfast and served in T Battery RHA and RFA (71959). He DoW on the Somme on the 16.9.16 and is buried in Longueval Road Cemetery, France, row E, grave 11. There is no headstone inscription.
451KnoxWilliam RobertCaptGNDAmericanUSMCLisburnNew YorkLisburn/MontrealLisburnDominican RepublicKIA1918-03-24 00:00:0028Cypress Hills National Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York
452LairdGeorgeCpl88352RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1915-06-16 00:00:00Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumLAIRD, Corporal George. Born in Blaris Co. Antrim, he lived on the Low Road, Lisburn, enlisted in the town and served in 2 RIR (8835). KIA in Belgium on the 16.6.15 his death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate, Memorial, Belgium. According to the Standard for the 2.6.15, he, like Daniel Lappin, below, was wounded while involved, “in the charge of the 16th. June”.
453LamontWilliamRm1804711RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1916-09-01 00:00:0025Ration Farm, La Plus Douve Cemetery Annex, Ploegsteert, BelgiumLAMONT, Rifleman William. Born and living in Lisburn, he served in A Company 11 RIR (18047) embarking with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. KIA in Belgium on the 1.9.16 aged 25, he is buried in Ration Farm (La Plus Douve) Annex, Belgium, plot 2, row C, grave 24. This is the same grave number as Rifleman Thomas McClure, below. They have separate headstones but they stand side by side. The grave is also next to that of Samuel Ward. The headstone inscription reads, “Father in thy gracious keeping, leave we now our loved one sleeping”. He was the husband of Sarah McKearney, formerly Lamont, of 23 Canal Street, Lisburn and son of Robert and Lizzie Lamont of 42 Gregg Street, Lisburn whose nephew James Mulholland (below) was killed in the same action. Sarah McKearney’s was the sister of Samuel Purdy who was KIA in Belgium on the 16.8.17. At the time of his death she had not re-married and had been living at 48 Canal Street with her daughter Maggie Lamont and sister and brother-in-law Maggie and Fred McWilliams. Her address following her second marriage was next door to her mother, Margaret Purdy. Had she married her mother’s and possibly her own old next door neighbour? Sarah Lamont (McKearney) included a poem with her husband’s death notice in the Herald on the 8 September 1917. “Not now but in the coming years, It may be in the better land, We’ll read the meaning of our tears, Ah! Then sometime we’ll understand”. So too did her mother, William Lamont’s mother-in-law Margaret Purdy. “Though we shall mourn, Those in life the dearest, They shall return, Christ when Thou appearest”.
454LappinDanielRm50472RIRIrish5RIR?ShankillLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1915-06-16 00:00:0022Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumLAPPIN, Rifleman Daniel (Dan/Dannie). Born in Shankill, he enlisted at Lisburn where he was an Orangeman and member of the 1st. Lisburn battalion, UVF. He was a reservist in 5 RIR and was called up at the start of the war, serving in 2 RIR (5047) along with his brother William. KIA in Belgium on the 16.6.15 aged 22, his death is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, panel 40. He was the son of William and Jane Lappin of 12 Millview, Chapel Hill, Lisburn, Co. Antrim and brother of Jane Lappin and William Lappin, below. Writing to his parents after his death, one of his officers reported that, “He was a brave lad, and it will be of some comfort to you to know that his death was instantaneous”. According to the Standard for the 2.6.15, he, like George Laird, above, was hit while involved, “in the charge of the 16th. June”. Private A. Phillips, (8521) B Company 1 ASH who was serving in France, had the following poem published in the Standard on the 20 August 1915, “In loving memory” of his friend Dan Lappin. “Though buried in a distant grave, Amidst the shot and shell, For country’s sake he gave his life, He stood his troubles well. For years and years he was my chum, How sudden was his call, I never knew a better friend; he died beloved by all. Sleep on, dear Dan, sleep on In the heavens of the blest; You are not dead, but gone before, To the land of peace and rest. If this world is full of sorrow, Now his pains and trials are o’er; And some day we hope to meet him on the bright eternal shore”. Private Phillips appears to have survived the war.
455LappinWilliamRm53772RIRIrish5RIR?LisburnLisburnLisburnFranceRearDOW1915-06-24 00:00:0024Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, FranceLAPPIN, Rifleman William. Born at Lisburn, he was an Orangeman and member of the 1st. Lisburn battalion, UVF. He enlisted at the start of the war in 5 RIR and was sent to the front on the 26.12.15 where he served in 2 RIR (5377) along with his brother Daniel. He DoW in 11 General Hospital, Boulogne, France on the 24.6.15 aged 24, from gunshot wounds to the leg possibly received at Ypres. He is Buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, France, plot 8, row B, grave 46 and was the son of William and Jane Lappin of 12 Millview, Chapel Hill, Lisburn, and brother of Jane Lappin and Daniel Lappin, above.
456LarmourSamuelCpl/Pvt84791RInFIrishBlarisLurganTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-08-21 00:00:00Helles Memorial, GallipoliLARMOUR, Private Samuel. Born in Blaris Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Lurgan and served in 1 RInF (8479). KIA in Gallipoli on the 21.8.15, his death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panels 97-101.
457LarmourAlexanderSgt1666212RIRIrish5 and 11 RIR?LisburnBelfastLisburnLisburnBelgiumPoperingheDOW1918-04-11 00:00:0027Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, BelgiumLARMOUR, Sergeant Alexander, MM. Born and living in Lisburn, where he may have been a reservist in 5 RIR, he enlisted at Belfast, and may have embarked for France from Bordon in October 1915 as a rifleman with 11 RIR. He was involved in the attempt to save Henry Corkin from drowning on the 17.5.16 and was recommended for the DCM “for bravery under enemy fire” in the summer of 1916. Awarded the M.M., being one of the first Lisburn soldiers to win the award, he was wounded in September 1916 and in May 1917, received the Ulster Division Parchment for gallantry in the field. Transferred to 12 RIR (16662) when 11 RIR were disbanded, he DoW in Belgium on the 11.4.18 aged 27. Buried in Lijssenthock Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, Belgium, plot 26, row H, grave 6A, the headstone inscription reads, “Peace, perfect peace”. He was the son of the late Alexander and Elizabeth Larmour of Lisburn, and his late wife lived at Mercer Street in the town. He was a brother-in-law, John Harvey, lived at Church Street, Lisburn.
458LavertyJoseph2Lt13RIRIrishLisburnTobermore/BelfastBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-16 00:00:00Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumLAVERTY, Second Lieutenant Joseph. A school teacher by profession he had held posts at Edenderry in Omagh, Ballinalee, Wilson’s Hospitals Endowed School in Westmeath and Newtownards Model School before being appointed principal at Castlerobin National School, Lisburn (just north of Sale’s Corner), where he appears to have lived. He volunteered for the army through Queen’s OTC and served in 13 RIR. He was KIA in Belgium on the 16.8.17 a year after first going to the front. His death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium, panels 138-140, 162-162A and 163A. He was the son of James Laverty of Tobermore, Co. Derry and brother of W.J. Laverty of 165 York Road, Belfast
459LaveryCharlesPvt69022RInFIrishLisburnLisburnBelfastFranceLensKIA1915-05-16 00:00:00Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg-l'Avoue, FranceLAVERY, Private Charles. Born in Lisburn, he lived in Belfast, enlisted at Lisburn and served in C Company 2 RInF (6902). He was listed as MIA in France from the 16.5.15 and subsequently recorded as KIA from that date. His death is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, France, panel 16 or 17. He was the husband of Sarah Lavery of 6 Longstone Street, Lisburn who had a letter published in the Standard on the 16.7.15 enquired as to his whereabouts.
460LaveryEdwardPvt107392RInFIrishLisburnLisburnCookstownLisburnFranceLensKIA1915-05-16 00:00:0018Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg-l'Avoue, FranceLAVERY, Private Edward. Born in Lisburn, he lived in Cookstown, enlisted at Lisburn and served in 2 RInF (10739). KIA in France on the 16.5.15 aged 18, his death is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, France, panels 16 or 17. He was the son of John Lavery of 10 Old Hillsborough Road, Lisburn.
461LaveryThomasSgt95736RIRIrishBallinderryBelfastBallinderryBallinderryTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-08-08 00:00:0021Helles Memorial, GallipoliLAVERY, Sergeant Thomas. Born and living in Ballinderry, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 6 RIR (9573). KIA in Gallipoli on the 8.8.15 age 21, his death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panels 177-178. He was the son of Margaret Lavery of Gortrainey, Ballinderry, Co. Antrim. Lavery, ThomasNigel Henderson/GlenavyHistory.com
462LaveryWilliamSgt1804811RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-06-24 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceLAVERY, Sergeant William. Born in Lisburn, he lived on the Ballynahinch Road in the town. He had served with the RInF during the Boer War and held both the King’s and Queen’s medals. After leaving the army he became a postman in the town. An “ardent unionist” and member of Lisburn LOL 141, he was one of the eight founder members of the 1st. Lisburn battalion of the UVF in which he held the rank of Sergeant Instructor, and was responsible for drilling one of the Lisburn Companies. He enlisted at Lisburn and served in 11 RIR (18048) along with two of his brothers Riflemen James and Jack Lavery who were in the same platoon. They all embarked for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. William Lavery was KIA on the Somme on the 24.6.16 by the same shell which killed William Leatham, his death is commemorated on Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A/B. He left a wife and 5 children. James and Jack were both wounded a week later on the 1.7.16 and, in early July, Jack was in hospital suffering from shell shock. James, who might have lived at 90 Longstone Street, Lisburn, may have been a PoW in Germany after having originally been reported killed. Another brother, Private and later Corporal Richard (Dick) Lavery who served in 2 RInF, had been a regular soldier with eight years service in China, Malta and Crete and, at the outbreak of the war, was a reservist and one of the first men to leave Lisburn. Involved in the retreat from Mons, he was wounded during the attack on the Aisne on the 13 September 1914 at about the time his three brothers were due to leave for Clandeboye for their initial training. From his hospital bed in Leicester, Dick Lavery had written to his mother describing how his Company had forced their way across the Aisne and “were advancing under a heavy fire when I got hit with a piece of a shell”. He was also shot in the knee but managed to “crawl about half a mile back, with shells bursting all around me, to get out of danger”. In a more oblique reference to the hardships that had to be endured, he commented that “at times the food supply was not just what one would get at home, and … for the first week of the big battle the troops were glad to get an apple or even a piece of mangold”. After recovering from his wounds and the operation to remove a bullet from his knee, he returned to duty and saw further action in Gallipoli. All three of William Lavery’s brothers appear to have survived the war. Their mother, Mrs. Lavery lived at Summerville on the Old Hillsborough Road in Lisburn while a brother-in-law, Wesley Graham, lived at 66 Melrose Street, Belfast. Lavery, WilliamILC&LM
463LaveryHenryRm57237RIRIrishH'boroLisburnH'boroH'boroBelgiumMessinesKIA1917-04-30 00:00:0024Kemmel Chateau Military Cemetery, BelgiumLAVERY, Rifleman Henry. Born and living in Hillsborough, (possibly Ballykeel, Artifinney). He enlisted at Lisburn and served in 7 RIR (5723). KIA in Belgium on the 30.4.17 aged 24, he is buried in Kemmel Chateau Military Cemetery, Belgium, row N, grave 64. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of Mary E. Lavery of Halliday's Bridge, Hillsborough, Co. Down. Halliday’s Bridge was a bridge over the canal near Lower Kilwarlin Parish church. Its name only survives now on the local Orange Hall.
464LawJamesPvt1305012RSScottishLisburnGlasgowDunmurryDunmurryFranceLensKIA1915-08-23 00:00:0032Cambrin Churchyard Extension, FranceLAW, Private James. Born in Lisburn Co. Antrim, he lived in Dunmurry, enlisted at Glasgow and served in 12 RS (13050). KIA in France on the 23.8.15 aged 32, he is buried in Cambrin Churchyard Extension, France, row E or F, grave 43. He was the son of James and Ellen Law of Dunmurry.
465LawFrederick JamesRm87016RIRIrishLurganMoiraMoiraBelgiumPoperingheKIA1918-04-16 00:00:0031Canada Farm Cemetery, BelgiumLAW, Rifleman Frederick (Fred) James. He lived in Moira, Co. Down, enlisted at Lurgan, Co. Armagh and served in 16 RIR (870). KIA in Belgium on the 16.4.18 age 31, he is buried in Canada Farm Cemetery, Belgium, plot 4, row A, grave 33. (This is next but one to George McClure, below, who was also in 16 RIR). He was the son of James and Annie Law of Moira, Co. Down. Law, FrederickJamesNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
466LawStanleyPvt56555CRIrishRDF?BelfastLeedsLeedsDublinFranceOtherKIA1918-10-09 00:00:0024Montay-Neuvilly Road Cemetery, Montay, FranceLAW, Private Stanley. Born in Belfast, he lived and enlisted at Leeds and served in B Company 5 CR (5655). KIA in France on the 9.10.18 aged 24, he is buried in Montay-Neuvilly Road Cemetery, Montay, France, plot 1, row F, grave 9. He was the son of Charles Muller Law and Joyce Eaton Law of 28 Hamilton Street, South Circular Road, Dublin. Law, StanleyPat Geary/De Ruvignys
467LeaheyHughRm80915RIRIrishDunmurryBelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0023Thiepval Memorial, FranceLEAHEY, Rifleman Hugh. Born in Dunmurry, he enlisted at Belfast and served in A Company 15 RIR (809). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 age 23, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France, pier and face 15 A and B. He was the son of the late Robert and Rose Leahey.
468LeathamWilliamRm1807711RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-06-24 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceLEATHEM, Rifleman William. Born in Lisburn on the 22.6.1894, he may have lived in Young St. or Office Street in the town and was a “prominent unionist in the area”, a member of Lisburn Mechanics LOL 557 and of the 1st Lisburn battalion UVF. He may also have been a member of Lisnagarvey Hockey Club. A plasterer by trade, having served his apprenticeship with David M’Henry of Lisburn, he also worked for a time at Queen’s Island, Belfast. He enlisted in Lisburn along with 350 others in his UVF battalion, served in 11 RIR (18077) and embarked for France from Bordon in October 1915 along with his brother Lance Corporal John Leathem. KIA on the Somme on the 24.6.16, two days short of his 22 birthday, by the same shell which killed William Lavery, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, faces A/B. He was the eldest son of Henry and Barbara Leathem of 22 Young Street, Lisburn and nephew of Annie and Fred Thompson of 40 Bridge Street, Lisburn. His brother John Leatham, who before the war had been an apprentice in the offices of the Lisburn Standard, was invalided home in January 1916 because of ear problems brought on by frost. He was involved in the fighting in Dublin during the Easter Rising. Serving there under Captain Colthrust, he was among the party that arrested Sheehy-Skeffington. By January 1916 he was with 18 RIR, a reserve battalion, at Clandeboye waiting to be posted back to the front. John Leatham appears to have survived the war.
469LeathemWilliam HLEATHEM, Rifleman William H. Served in 11 RIR, may have embarked for France from Bordon in October 1915 and might have been wounded on the Somme on the 1.7.16. He is commemorated on Lisburn and Christ Church War Memorials, but there is no further trace.
470LeckeyWilliamRm216311RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Serre Road Cemetery No.2, FranceLECKEY, Rifleman William. Born in Blaris, he lived in Longstone Street in the town where he was a painter employed by Moses Bullick a well known businessman who had premises in Belfast and Lisburn. He enlisted at Lisburn and served in A Company 11 RIR (2163) with whom he embarked for France from Bordon in October 1915. KIA on the Somme on the 1 July 1916, he is buried in Serre Road Cemetery Number 2, France, plot 24, row L, grave 5. He was the brother of Annie Leckey of 103 Longstone Street, who inserted an In Memoriam notice “In fond and loving memory” in the Herald on the 30 June 1917, and brother-in-law of James and Mary Leckey of Greg Street and 113 Longstone Street, Lisburn who inserted In Memoriam notices in the Herald on the 30 June 1917, 5 July 1919 and Standard on the 2 July 1920. The notice in the Herald inserted by his sister on the 5 July 1919 read, “Ever remembered. Peace! Perfect peace! With loved ones far away? In Jesus’ keeping we are safe, and they”. Lecky, WilliamNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
471LeckeyJosephPvt304971RAFAir ForceLisburnHomeLisburn1918-10-26 00:00:0018Lisburn CemeteryLECKEY, Private Joseph. Served at the Receiving Depot, Blandford, RAF (304971). He died on the 26.10.18 aged 18 and is buried in Lisburn Cemetery, old row E, grave 352. He was the son of Mrs. Mary Leckey of 7 Bullicks Square, Linenhall Street, Lisburn. The headstone inscription reads, “O Joseph when I think of thee tis just a step to Calvary”.
472LennoxFrancis JohnRm1809011RIRIrishCastledawsonLisburnCastledawson/LisburnCastledawsonFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceLENNOX Lance Corporal Francis John. Born in Castledawson, he lived there and in Lisburn. He was a member of Lisburn Mechanics LOL 557 and the local UVF battalion. For two years before the war he had been in charge of the woolens and ready-made department in Messrs. Duncans. Enlisting at Lisburn he served in 11 RIR (18090) with whom he probably embarked for France in October 1915. KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A or B. He was the son of Mr. W.G. Lennox of Aughrim, Castledawson, Co. Derry. His photograph reproduced in the Standard on the 11 August 1916 had been sent in by a fellow soldier who asked the paper to publish it as, “Lennox was a downright good fellow, and one of the most popular men in the battalion”.
473LewisWilliamCpl8658CEF MtbaRImperialStoneyfordValcartier, CanadaAghaleeBelgiumYpresKIA1915-04-22 00:00:0022Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumLEWIS, Corporal William. Born in Stoneyford on the 6 August 1892 he subsequently emigrated to Canada where he worked as a druggist. A single man he had served for 4 years in the 90th Winnipeg Rifles before enlisting at Valcartier on the 22 September 1914 aged 22 years and 1 month. 5’ 10¼” tall with a 35¼” chest (fully expanded) and a 2½” range of expansion, he had a fair complexion, blue eyes and light brown hair and a scar on each buttock. Serving in 8 CI MtbaR (865), he died in Belgium on the 22.4.15 age 22 and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Ypres, Belgium, panels 24-30. He was the son of Robert Joseph and Sarah Jane Lewis of Laurelvale, Aghalee. His younger brother Henry also served in the Canadian army (532223). According to the Herald, he had been “in business” in Canada although his attestation paper shows that he was employed as a clerk by the Hudson Bay Company. Born on the 28.4.1894 in Co. Antrim, he joined up in Winnipeg on the 25.3.16 where he may have been living at 229 Edmonton Street. He was a single man and had no previous military experience. 5’ 9½” tall with a 32“ chest and 3½“ expansion, he had a fair complexion, hazel eyes and dark hair. Awarded the MM in 1917 at the age of 22, he appears to have survived the war.
474LewisWilliamPvt105016RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLisburnLisburnTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-08-10 00:00:00Helles Memorial, GallipoliLEWIS, Private William. Born in Blaris Co. Antrim, he lived and enlisted in Lisburn and served in 6 RIR (10501). KIA in Gallipoli on the 10.8.15, his death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial Gallipoli, panels 178-180. He was the son of Margaret Lewis of 40 Ballynahinch Road, Lisburn.
475LewisEdwardRm724411RIRIrishLambegLisburnTullynacrossTullynacrossFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceLEWIS, Rifleman Edward. Born in Lambeg, and employed in Barbour’s mill at Hilden, he was a married man with two children, who lived at Tullynacross. He enlisted at Lisburn and served in B Company 11 RIR (7244) embarking with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A/B. Two nephews, Rifleman Bertie Webb 11 RIR and Private Ernest Webb RAMC had also enlisted. Both seem to have survived the war.
476LindsayJosephRm53477RIRIrish11RIR?MullaglassLisburnFranceLensKIA1916-04-02 00:00:00Bois-Carre Military Cemetery, Haisnes, FranceLINDSAY, Rifleman Joseph. Born in Mullaglass Co. Down, he had served in the Boer War and worked in Glenmore Bleach works. At the start of the Great War he re-enlisted at Lisburn and served in 7 RIR (5347). KIA in France on the 2.4.16, he is buried in Bois-Carre Military Cemetery, Haisnes, France, row D, grave 7. There is no headstone inscription. According to Rifleman Thomas Smyth one of his friends, he, “was only half-an-hour in the trenches when he was killed and … his last dying words and prayers were for his wife and little kiddies”. Another friend, Rifleman William Jones wrote, “Joe was a good soldier and all the boys are very sorry about him”. He was a brother of Robert and possibly of Richard Lindsay, below, and the husband of Emily Lindsay (nee Gregg) of Bradburys Buildings, Hill Street, Lisburn. They had (at least) six children, the eldest of whom was eleven. William, who served in the Royal Ulster Rifles during World War 2 and was killed in Italy, Robert John who was also killed in WW2, Edith, David, Joseph and Thomas who was, “born with a charm”. Children with whooping cough would be brought to touch his hair in the hope of a cure. He was also the son of the late John Lindsay, a land steward, and Agnes Lindsay (nee McFadden) who lived at 3 Grove Street, Low Road, and later 6 Spruce Street, Lisburn. She had lived at Donaghmore until her husband’s death but had then moved to Lisburn in search of work, her daughters finding employment in Hilden Mill and the boys in the bleach works. Following the death of her son Robert, below, she received a pension from the Canadian government. Bois-Carre Military Cemetery is in the fields north of Loos, close to St. Marys ADS Cemetery where John Kipling is thought to be buried. It was started in 1915 and was used largely by the 16th. Irish Division until August 1916. The irregular arrangement of the rows was due to the “difficult circumstances” under which burials were carried out.
477LindsayRobertPvt19226215CEF CORImperialLisburnFranceArrasKIA1917-04-09 00:00:0032Arras Road Cemetery Memorial, RoclincourtLINDSAY, Private Robert. Born on the 28.5.1885, he lived on the Low Road, Lisburn. A single man with a fiancé in Canada, he was an engineer by profession and enlisted at Toronto on the 16.8.1915 aged 30 years and 3 months, having served in the Royal Irish Rifles. He had a fair complexion with blue eyes and brown hair, was 5’ 3’’ in height and had a 37’’ chest with 3’’ expansion. Having volunteered for overseas service, he was able to visit home wearing his “swanky uniform” and his arrival there was greeted with “great celebrations”. He served in COR, CI (192262) and was KIA on the 9.4.17 age 32 at a time when he was expected home on leave. His death is commemorated on the Arras Road Cemetery Memorial 28, Nine Elms Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France. He was the son of the late John Lindsay, a land steward, and Agnes Lindsay (nee McFadden) who lived at 3 Grove Street, Low Road, and later 6 Spruce Street, Lisburn. She had lived at Donaghmore until her husband’s death but had then moved to Lisburn in search of work, her daughters finding employment in Hilden Mill and the boys in the bleach works. Following Robert’s death she received a pension from the Canadian government. He was also a brother of Joseph and possibly of Richard Lindsay above.
478LindsayHughLcpl221011RIRIrishCrumlinBelfastCrumlinCrumlinBelgiumMessinesKIA1917-06-07 00:00:0021Spanbroekmolen British Cemetery, BelgiumLINDSAY, Lance Corporal Hugh. Born and living in Crumlin, he was a member there of the Rose of Sharon LOL 144, Lough Neagh I.O.G.T. No. 144, and of the South Antrim Voulnteers, UVF. He enlisted at Belfast and served in the Lewis Gun Section, 11 RIR (2210) embarking with them as a rifleman for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. KIA in Belgium on the 7.6.17 age 21, he is buried in Spanbroekmolen British Cemetery, Heuvelland, Belgium, plot D, grave 7. He was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. David Lindsay of Main Street, Crumlin, Co. Antrim.
479LindsayRichardLcpl186815RIRIrishLisburnBelfastFranceRearDOW/KIA1918-11-05 00:00:00Longuenesse Souvenir Cemetery, St. Omer, FranceLINDSAY, Lance Corporal Richard. Born in Lisburn, he lived on the Low Road in the town, enlisted at Belfast and served in 15 RIR (1868). He DoW in France on the 5.11.18 and is buried in Longuenesse Souvenir Cemetery, St. Omer, France, plot 5, row E, grave 41. He may have been a brother of Joseph and Robert Lindsay, above and below, and, if so, was the son of the late John Lindsay, a land steward, and Agnes Lindsay (nee McFadden) who lived at 3 Grove Street, Low Road, and later 6 Spruce Street, Lisburn. She had lived at Donaghmore until her husband’s death but had then moved to Lisburn in search of work, her daughters finding employment in Hilden Mill and the boys in the bleach works. Following the death of her son Robert, below, she received a pension from the Canadian government.
480LittleHenryPvt33627LRIrishLisburnBirkenheadBirkenheadLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-09-03 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceLITTLE, Private Henry. Born in Lisburn where the family lived in Barrack Street and he was a member of Lisburn United F.C, he lived and enlisted at Birkenhead, Cheshire and served in 7 LR (3362). Reported missing and subsequently KIA on the Somme on the 3.9.16, he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 16, face E. Although his name appeared on an official casualty list in October 1916 as DoW there was continuing uncertainty. A short article in the Lisburn Standard for the 27 October noted that, “his relatives are hoping for the best but … fear the worst, as since he was officially reported as wounded his name has appeared on a War Office list as ‘died of wounds’. Further news is anxiously awaited and would be thankfully received”. Official word was slow in coming, his death was not confirmed until August 1917. He was a brother of Frank Little of Barrack Street, Lisburn.
481LoganThomasRm1810411RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceLOGAN, Rifleman Thomas. Born and living in Lisburn where he enlisted, he served in A or B Company 11 RIR (18104) with whom he may have embarked for France from Bordon in October 1915. Reported MIA on the 16.6.16 and a year later in July 1917 confirmed as having been KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, faces A/B. He was the youngest son of Eliza and the late Paul Logan of Market Lane or Market Place, Lisburn. A death notice was placed in the Standard on the 20.7.17 by Paul and Maggie Logan (possibly a brother and sister-in-law) of 23 Market Place, Lisburn, mentioning that his death had been confirmed.
482LoganWilliamRm1959811RIRIrishCrumlinAntrimCrumlinCrumlinFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceLOGAN, Rifleman William. Born and living in Crumlin, Co. Antrim, he was a member of the Orange Order in Glenavy. He enlisted at Antrim and served in 11 RIR (19598), embarking with them for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Reported missing and subsequently KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France pier and face 15 A and B. He was the son of Campbell and Eliza Logan of Gortnagallon, Crumlin, and husband of Aggie Logan of Crumlin.
483LongRichardsonLcpl1668311.13RIRIrish11 RIRLambegBelfastLisburnLisburnFranceCambraiKIA1917-12-08 00:00:0037Metz-en-Couture Communal Cemetery, FranceLONG, Lance corporal Richardson. Born in Lambeg, he lived in Lisburn where, before the war he was employed at the local branch of Liptons Ltd. He enlisted at Belfast and served initially in 11 RIR with whom he embarked for France from Bordon in October 1915. Subsequently transferred to 11/13 RIR (16683) when the 11th. and 13th. battalions were amalgamated in November 1917, he was KIA in France on the 8.12.17 aged 37. His Company Captain wrote to his parents explaining how, “He was carrying out his usual duty of conveying rations up to the battalion when an unlucky shell exploded nearby, killing him instantaneously. He had worked directly under me for nearly two years and I found him a faithful and steady soldier, always ready to do what he could. He died doing his duty – the best of all deaths”. The Chaplain also wrote, “We all feel his loss very keenly. He was one of the original members of the battalion. … [and] was looked upon as one upon whom the utmost reliance and trust could be placed”. Richardson Long is buried in Metz-en-couture Communal Cemetery, British Extension, France, plot 3, row C, grave 3. The headstone inscription reads, “Fifth son of the late Richardson and Mary Long, Lisburn, Ireland”. Richardson and Mary Long lived on the Low Road.
484LowryHenryRm109911RIRIrishDerriaghyBelfastLisburn/MoiraLisburn/MoiraFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceLOWRY, Rifleman Henry. Born in Derriaghy, he lived at 30 Wesley Street, Low Road, Lisburn with his parents although his address is also given as Railway Tavern, Moira where his aunt lived. A member of the UVF, he enlisted at Belfast and served in B Company 11 RIR (1099) with whom he probably embarked for France from Bordon in October 1915. He was reported MIA on the 16.7.16 and subsequently KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16. His death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, faces A/B. He was the nephew of Sara Carlisle of the Railway Tavern, Moira. On the 28 April 1917 she had the following poem inserted in the Herald. “He marched away so manly, His young head proudly held, His footsteps never faltered, His courage never failed. Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Aunt”. After the war, on the 28 June 1919, she had an In Memoriam notice published in the same paper. “At the rivers crystal brink, Christ shall join each broken link. Ever remembered by his sorrowing Aunt”.
485LucasJosephPvt637191RSScottishPurdysburnBelfastBelfastEdenderryFranceSommeKIA1918-03-25 00:00:0025Pozieres Memorial, FranceLUCAS, Private Joseph. Born in Purdysburn, he lived and enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RF (63719). KIA on the Somme on the 25.3.18 age 25, his death is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, France, panels 19 to 21. He was the son of Joseph and Elizabeth Lucas of 46 Edenderry, Shaws Bridge, Belfast.
486LundyJohn (Patrick Joseph)Pvt187311RIrFIrishNewryBelfastNewryNewryFranceSommeKIA1918-03-24 00:00:0024Pozieres Memorial, FranceLUNDY, Private John. Born and living in Newry, he enlisted at Belfast and served in the RAMC (41594) before transferring to 1 RIrF (18731). KIA in France on the 24.3.18 age 24, his death is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, France. He was the son of James and Alice Lundy of 42 Mary Street, Newry, Co. Down. His Christian name is given as either John or Patrick Joseph depending on the source.
487LunnJamesCpl1805811RIRIrishBlarisLisburnRavarnettRavarnettFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceLUNN, Corporal James. Born in Blaris, he lived at Ravarnette, enlisted at Lisburn and served in B Company 11 RIR (18058) embarking with them as a Lance Corporal from Bordon Camp for France in October 1915. KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 possibly while attached to A Company, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15A/B. He was the husband of Sarah Lunn of Ravarnette, Lisburn and son of Joseph Lunn of the Old Hillsborough Road, Lisburn. His brother CSM T. Lunn RIR who was awarded the DCM, was wounded in the chest and back in August 1917 but appears to have survived.
488LynchJohnGnr51845RGASupportLisburnClydebankHomeHampshireDied1915-04-26 00:00:00Aldershot Military Cemetery, HampshireLYNCH, Gunner John. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Clydebank, Dunbartonshire and served in the RGA (51845). He died at “home” on the 26.4.15 and is buried in Aldershot Military Cemetery, Hampshire, row R, grave 307.
489LynessMatthewSgt11/64931RIRIrish11 RIRBlarisLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceAmiensDOW1918-03-22 00:00:0028St. Pierre Cemetery, Amiens, FranceLYNESS, Sergeant Matthew. Born in Blaris Co. Antrim, he lived in Lisburn and before the war had been employed at the York Street, Flax Spinning Company, Belfast. Enlisting at Lisburn in the 11 RIR, he embarked with them for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Wounded in September 1916 and possibly again in August or September 1917, he was transferred to 1 RIR (11/6493) not long before his death. Home on leave in February or early March 1918, he was badly wounded in the chest and legs at the start of the German offensive and died of wounds in hospital in France on the 22.3.18 aged 28. Buried in St. Pierre Cemetery, Amiens, France, plot 7, row E, grave 4, he was the son of Mary Anne Lyness of 35 Millbrook Road, Low Road, Lisburn.
490LynessBenjaminRmG/6541RIR Gar?Irish5 RIR?HomeLisburnDied1919-04-15 00:00:00Lisburn CemeteryLYNESS, Rifleman Benjamin. Served in 1 RIR (G/654) and de died at “home” on the 15.4.19. He is buried in Lisburn Cemetery, New Section, row E, grave 94. There is no headstone inscription.
491LyttleSamuelRm1811811RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0024Thiepval Memorial, FranceLYTTLE, Rifleman Samuel. Born in Lisburn, where he and his brother John, lived in Longstone Street, he was a shoemaker by trade, a member of the Heroes Temperance LOL 141 and of the UVF. He enlisted in the town and served in A Company 11 RIR (18118) with whom he embarked for France, along with his brother, from Bordon in October 1915. Reported MIA on the 16.6.16 and subsequently in June 1917, confirmed as having been KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 age 24, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, faces A/B. He was the son of Arthur and Mary A. Lyttle of Longstone Street, Lisburn. His grandmother Jane Morgan and aunt and uncle Sarah and John Morgan lived at Rosevale, Moira Road, Lisburn. The Lyttles were not the only family to suffer a protracted wait for news of a missing relative. In their case, we know that they, “hoped against hope that they would learn that he was still alive”. However, as the Standard reported in June 1917, “that slender chance has now been dashed”. As for John Lyttle, he too had originally been listed as killed on the 1.7.16. However by August his parents had been informed that he was a PoW in Germany. He appears to have survived the war. On the 23 June 1917 two poems to Samuel Lyttle were published in the Herald. The first from his parents read, “Duty called and he was there, To do his bit and take his share, His heart was good, his spirit brave, His resting place a soldier’s grave”. The second was included by his garndmaoher and Aunt and Uncle. “One by one the links are slipping, One by one the heroes are falling, But at last they all shall gather, When they hear the last roll call”. “Living for ever in our love enshrined” read the notice in the Herald for the 5.7.19.
492MacAuleySamuel JamesPvt80224115CEF CORImperialMLI and 135BelfastStrathroy? OntarioStrathroy? OntarioStrathroy? OntarioFranceOtherDOW1918-10-20 00:00:0030Auberchicourt British Cemetery, FranceMACAULEY, Private Samuel James. Born in Belfast on the 5.5.1888, he lived for a time at Culcavey before moving to Broomhedge, and 2 or 3 years before the war, to Canada. A cabinet maker by trade, he had 4 years service in the 26th. MLI [Manitoba Light Infantry?] when he enlisted at Strathroy? Ontario on the 27.11.1915 aged 27 years and 6 months. He was 5’10” tall, had a 40” chest fully expanded, dark complexion, brown eyes and black hair. Posted to the 135 Overseas Battalion, CEF and later to 15th. battalion, Canadian Infantry, 1 COR, CEF, (802241) he DoW in France on the 20.10.18 age 30. He is buried in Auberchicourt British Cemetery, France, plot 4, row B, grave 12 and was the husband of Mrs. James Macauley of Strathroy? Ontario.
493MacHenryJohnPvt14843778CEF MtbaRImperialDunmurry/LisburnFranceArrasKIA1917-04-09 00:00:0032Vimy Memorial, FranceMacHENRY, Private John. Born in Antrim on the 2 May 1885 he served his apprenticeship with his father before emigrating to Canada in about 1912. By 1915 he was living at 923 Lipton Street, Winnipeg and it was there that he enlisted on the 17 November that year. A single man with no military experience and a clerk by profession he was, at least according to the Stnd., “one of the first to respond to the call of King and Country in the Dominion”. 5’ 8” tall with a 37” chest (fully expanded) and a 3” range of expansion, he had a fair complexion, blue eyes and light brown hair. Serving in 78 CI, MtbaR (148437), he was KIA at Vimy Ridge in France on the 9 April 1917 aged 33, and is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial, Pas de Calais, France. The youngest son of David, a building contractor of Lisburn and Moss Side, Dunmurry, Co. Antrim, and Rebecca MacHenry, both his parents died shortly before the war, his father on the 2.3.13 aged 61, and mother on the 14.5.13 aged 57. At the time of his enlistment John MacHenry gave his sister Margaret Stevenson as his next of kin. She lived at 6 Indiana Avenue, Belfast. His parents are buried in Derriaghy parish church graveyard where their son’s death is commemorated on their headstone. His grandparents and aunt Ann Jane who died on the 26.8.35 aged 80, are buried in the same grave.
494MackellJosephRm52442RIRIrishBlarisDromoreLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1915-05-02 00:00:00Ridge Wood Military Cemetery, Voormezeele, BelgiumMACKELL, Rifleman Joseph. Born in Blaris, Co. Antrim, he was the son of Joseph and May Mackell who were married in Hillsborough, possibly at Rielly’s Trench, (to the west of Hillsborough) in 1879. In 1901 at the time of the census, the family were living in Young Street, though by the time of Joseph junior’s death they may have moved to Blaris. Joseph senior was employed as a boat/lighter man and worked on the barges, May was a mill worker. She was the daughter of John Lindsay who was also from Lisburn and worked as a labourer. Joseph junior who may also have been employed as a boatman, enlisted at Dromore, Co. Down and served in 2 RIR (5244). He was KIA in Belgium on the 2.5.15 and is buried in Ridge Wood Military Cemetery, Voormezeele, Belgium, plot 1, row A, grave 1. There is no headstone inscription. He was the brother of Patrick Mackell who lived in Barrack Street, Lisburn. According to the introduction in the cemetery register, “Ridge Wood was the name given to a wood standing on high ground between the Kemmel Road and Dickebusch lake ... the position was chosen for a front line cemetery as early as May 1915, the first graves belong to the 2nd. RIR.” All six graves in row A, plot 1 are 2 RIR and dated 2.5.15. The cemetery register entry for one of them, Rm. J. McIldoon, notes that he was KIA at Kemmel. Alexander Ritchie, below, is also buried here in plot 2, row N, grave 3. He was killed on the 13.3.16.
495MageeJohn EdwardPvt264732RInFIrish8 RMF 4144 H'boroLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-11-21 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceMAGEE, Private John Edward. Born in Hillsborough, Co. Down, he enlisted at Lisburn and served originally in 8 RMF (4144) before transferring to 2 RInF (26473). KIA in France on the 21.11.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 4D or 5B.
496MagillWilliamSgt1842313RIRIrishH'boroFranceSommeKilled accidentally1916-04-01 00:00:0026Forceville Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceMAGILL, Sergeant William. He had served his apprenticeship with Thomas McMullan and Co., wholesale chemists and druggists, Victoria Street, Belfast before becoming a partner in his father’s business in Hillsborough. A leading member of the UVF there, he was a Company Commander in the 2nd battalion West Down Regiment. He enlisted in 13 RIR 18423 and after training at Clandeboye and Seaford was posted to France where he became an instructor in a brigade grenade school. He was killed in France on the 1.4.16 aged 26 when testing a rifle grenade that exploded prematurely. Buried on the afternoon of the 2 April in Forceville Communal Cemetery Extension, France, plot 1, row A, grave 4 by the Rev A. Gibson a Presbyterian minister from Lurgan and Army Chaplain who also buried Jack Clay in the next grave but one, (see above), there is no headstone inscription. Ironically, just before his death, William Magill had been mentioned in dispatches. “At a bombing school a live bomb failed to explode after throwing. When the grenade was afterwards moved, it began to fuse and was dropped. Sergeant Magill, observing the danger, picked it up and hurled it into a trench twenty yards away, thus averting a very serious accident”. Writing to his parents, Colonel Savage his C.O. observed, “Your son excelled in his work. It was a pleasure to have been able to recommend him to some distinction for his gallantry when his courage and presence of mind averted a disaster”. He was the eldest son of James and Sarah Magill of Hillsborough, Co. Down where James Magill was a grocer and ironmonger. Magill, WilliamNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
497MaginessAlexanderPioneer330428RESupportLisburnLisburnHomeLisburnDied1919-02-20 00:00:0052Lisburn CemeteryMAGINNIS, Pioneer Alexander. Lived in Lisburn, and served in the RE (330428). He died at “home” on the 20.2.19 aged 52 and is buried in Lisburn Cemetery, new plot, row E, grave 215. The headstone inscription reads, “From his loving wife Sarah Jane Maginnis”. He was the husband of Sara Jane Dalzell, formerly Maginnis of 34 Canal Street, Lisburn.
498MaginnessThomasPvt230327RIrFIrishDrumgath, Co. DOWnLisburnFranceLensDOW1916-07-12 00:00:0030St. Patrick's Cemetery, Loos, FranceMAGINNESS, Private Thomas. Born in Drumgath, Co. Down, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 7 RIrF (23032). He DoW in France on the 12.7.16 aged 30 and is buried in St. Patrick's Cemetery, Loos, France, plot 3, row A, grave 25. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of the late Patrick Maginness and husband of the late Nancy Maginness.
499Maginnis/McGuinnessPatrickPvt177592RInFIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceLensKIA1915-05-16 00:00:0019Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg-l'Avoue, FranceMcGUINNESS, Private Patrick. Born and enlisting in Lisburn, he served in B Company 2 RInF (17759). KIA in France on the 16.5.15 aged 19, his death is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, France, panels 16-17. He was the son of John and Mary Ann McGuinness of 34 Barnsley Row, Lisburn.
500MagowanCharlesPvt263022NZEF CtbRImperialClogher, LisburnClogher, LisburnBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1917-06-05 00:00:0036La Plus Douve Farm Cemetery, Ploegsteert, BelgiumMAGOWAN, Private Charles. Lived at Clogher, south east of Lisburn and served in 2 CtbR, NZEF (26302). He was KIA in Belgium on the 5.6.17 age 36 and is buried in La Plus Douve Farm Cemetery, Belgium, plot 4, row E, grave 14. He was the son of Samuel and Mary McGowan of Clogher, Lisburn. His death was also commemorated by his brother William on the family headstone in Hillhall Presbyterian churchyard where his date of death is given as the 5.6.18. Mary Magowan died on the 15.08.1905 aged 62, Samuel Magowan on the 26.07.1913 aged 70 and William on the 29.12.1956 aged 85.
501MalcolmsonThomas RichardPvt319446AEFImperialLinton, VictoriaHillhead, LisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1917-07-08 00:00:00Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, Belgium
502MallonChristopherPvtRWKREnglishDunmurryDunmurryHomeDunmurry?Died1917-07-15 00:00:00Family burial ground, DrumbegMALLON, Private Christopher. Lived in Dunmurry and served in the Royal West Kent Regiment. He died at home on the 15.7.17 and was buried in the family burial ground at Drumbeg on the 17 July 1917. He was the son of Mrs. Mallon of Mill Row, Dunmurry. These details fit with the information on the War Memorials in Dunmurry and Drumbeg Parish churches however, according to the memorial in St. John the Baptist Parish Church, Suffolk, he served in the Royal Navy. However, there is no record of him in the WOCL, CWGC or IMR.
503MaloneWilliam Adolphe2Lt13ChREnglishBelfastBelgiumYpresKIA1917-05-16 00:00:0030Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumMALONE, 2nd. Lieutenant William Adolph. Born on the 11.4.1887, he was an old scholar of Friends’ School, Lisburn and of Belfast Royal Academy. He served in 13 ChR and was KIA in Belgium on the 16.5.17 aged 30. His death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate, Memorial, Belgium, panels 19 and 22. He was the son of John and Margaret B. Malone of Entroya, Fort William Park, Belfast. His brother 2Lt. Bristow M. Malone 9RIrF was reported as missing and subsequently KIA on the 16.8.17.
504ManningRobert CharlesMajRESupportCEF Div. Cyclist Co. No. 2128DublinValcartier, CanadaH'boro/AngleseyFranceRearDOW1918-09-06 00:00:0029Pernes British Cemetery, Pas De Calais, FranceMANNING, Major Robert Charles, DSO, MC, Legion of Honour, Mentioned in Dispatches. Born at Rathgar, Co. Dublin on the 6 July 1889, he attended Trinity where he joined the OTC. Graduating as a civil engineer he subsequently emigrated to Canada where he enlisted in the Divisional Cycling Company (no. 2128) at Valcartier on the 26 September 1914. A single man at the time of his enlistment, he was 5’ 7” tall, had a 35” chest (fully expanded with a 2½” range of expansion), dark complexion, brown eyes and dark hair. He also had a mole on his left breast and two scars on his left shoulder. He served for a time as QMS 2128 with the Divisional Mounted Troops of the 1st Canadian Division and subsequently as an officer in 170th Tunnelling Co. RE. Most of the “Weekly Mine and Progress Reports” in the units War Diary from the 5 July 1916 are signed by Manning - at which time he held the rank of Captain.

A telegram to his wife from the War Office dated the 7 September 1918 informed her that he had been admitted wounded to a CCS and was dangerously ill. “Visit not possible”, it tersely recorded. In fact, Robert Manning had died of his wounds at No. 22 CCS possibly in Pernes, France on the 6 September 1918 age 29. The son of Lionel John and F. M. Manning of Valley, Anglesey (at the time of his enlistment in Canada) and Hillsborough, Co. Down he was also the husband of Annie Frances Manning of Valley, Anglesey, presumably having married some time after enlisting in Canada. A letter from her solicitor to the War Office on the 14 April 1919 records that “Mrs. Manning is now in a nursing home expecting her confinement”. In other words at the time of her husband’s death she would have been about two months pregnant. Robert Manning is buried in Pernes British Cemetery, Pas De Calais, France, plot 6, row A, grave 38.

The War Diary for 170 Tunnelling Company does not shed any light directly on his death. However, the Weekly Mine and Progress Report for the 4 September 1918, the last one signed by Manning, refers to “maintenance of mine system and ... subways. Listening nil. Supervision of trench digging and wiring [in the] Le Brebis ... and Mazingarbe localit[ies]” In addition an investigation party had “discovered 4 booby traps” and more were found on the 6 September, the day of his death, on the 55 Division front ... in Towpath Alley Trench. “15 large trench mortars ... were discovered buried in the bottom of the trench; nose caps uppermost and four feet apart. The nose caps were just visible and were level with the bottom of the trench. There were no duckboards in the trench. Thirteen of these trench mortars had ordinary nose caps, but in two of them the proper nose cap had been removed and another substituted. This was loose and carried a striking pin, the whole being supported by a light spring. Any pressure on this nose cap would have driven the striker into the detonator and exploded the trench mortar. The fifth and tenth trench mortars had the lose nose caps. Another trap was discovered ... . A long piece of loose wire was found lying in the trench; this was traced up and found to be connected to the string of the ordinary stick bomb”. There is no reference to any other incident and no proof that his injuries were linked to the booby traps; that simply remains a possibility.
Manning, RobertCharlesPat Geary/Holyhead WM
505MarksRobertRm1839711RIRIrishBallymenaLisburnDrumbegFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0034Thiepval Memorial, FranceMARKS, Rifleman Robert. Born in Ballymena, he had served in the Boer War and had been employed at Millar and Stevenson’s coal yard. A reservist, he enlisting in Lisburn, and served in A Company 11 RIR (18397) with whom he embarked for France from Bordon in October 1915. KIA on the Somme on the 1 July 1916 aged 34, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, faces A/B. He was the husband of Alice Marks of 11 Back Lane and Drumbeg, Lisburn. They had two children. In an In Memoriam notice published in the Herald on the 30.6.17, she included the simple comment, “Not lost, but gone before”. After the war, on the 28 June 1919, she had an In Memoriam notice published in the same paper. “Buried in the hearts of those who loved him. Deeply regretted by his loving wife and two children”. His brother Jack Marks was also on active service while his sister Mrs. Rose Bruce lived at Brucedale, Wards River in New South Wales. On the 9 August 1919 she and her husband Robert and their children John, Robert, Bert, Margaret and Mertyl included another In Memoriam notice in the Herald. “We, who loved you, sadly miss you, As it dawns another year; In the lonely hours of thinking, Thoughts of you are ever near”.
506MarksThomasRm1686211RIRIrishBelfastBelfastLambegDunmurryFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceMARKS, Rifleman Thomas. Born in Belfast and living at Lambeg, he was a member Sommerhill LOL 137 and of the UVF. He enlisted at Belfast and served in B Company 11 RIR (16862) with whom he embarked for France from Bordon in October 1915. Reported missing on the 16.7.16 and subsequently, in June 1917, he was confirmed as having been KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16. His death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, and on the family headstone in Derriaghy parish church graveyard. He was the only son of Mary Ann and Thomas Marks of Mosside, Dunmurry. She had died on the 9.8.05 and Thomas on the 9.11.19. Marks, ThomasNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
507MarnellDominicLcpl4/38455RIrFIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnMiddle EastPalestineDOW1918-03-18 00:00:00Jerusalem War Cemetery, PalestineMARNELL, Lance corporal Dominic. Born in Lisburn where he lived with his grandmother, Mrs. Marnell, at Ava Street, he was employed in Barbours Mill at Hilden. Enlisting at Lisburn, he served in 5 RIrF (4/3845), DoW in Palestine on the 18.3.18 and is buried in Jerusalem War Cemetery, Palestine, row Q, grave 67. He was the son of the late William Marnell and grandson of the late Constable John Marnell, RIC, Lisburn.
508MarshallCharles DunlopRm42811RIRIrishBallylessonBelfastBallylesson/BelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0034Thiepval Memorial, FranceMARSHALL, Rifleman Charles Dunlop. Born in Ballylesson, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 11 RIR (428). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 age 34, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A and B. He was the son of Joseph and Matilda Marshall of Primrose Villa, Ballylesson, and husband of Elizabeth Marshall of 16 Rutland Street, Belfast.
509MartinAlexander (Alex)Pvt12/800NZEF AckRImperialNew ZealandMahgeragallTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-04-25 00:00:0020Lone Pine Memorial, GallipoliMARTIN, Private Alexander (Alex). Emigrated to Australia in 1913 and a few months later to New Zealand where he enlisted, serving in the AckR, NZ Infantry (12/800). After initial training he was sent to Egypt where he was involved in fighting against the Turks. In his last letter home, “he complained of the weariness of inactivity” and how it was, “awful to lie here in idleness and read of all the fighting that was going on” in Europe where he wished he would be sent. Initially reported missing after the first Dardanelles landings, he was subsequently (probably early 1916) reported KIA in Gallipoli on the 25.4.15 aged 20. His death is commemorated on the Lone Pine Memorial, Gallipoli, panel 72 and on the family headstone in Magheragall Parish church graveyard. He was the son of John Martin, a member of Lisburn Board of Guardians and a rural councilor in Magheragall, and Isabella Martin, Moor Farm, Hallstown, Magheragall and nephew of Mr. A.S. Mayes, of Bellevue and William Martin of Park Parade, Lisburn. A tribute to Alex Martin was paid by the Rev. Dundas of Magheragall Parish Church before his sermon on Sunday the 20 June 1915. His brother Second Lieutenant W.R. Martin served in the RIR during the war. He had been studying for the Ministry when the war broke out and received his commission through QUB OTC in December 1916. Involved in the fighting at Messines in early June 1917, a long letter to his father describing his experiences then was published in the Standard on the 22.6.17. Reported wounded in late November or early December that year, he appears to have survived the war.Martin, AlexanderPat Geary/ Auckland Museum
510MartinDavidRm473211RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-06-17 00:00:0017Authuile Military Cemetery, FranceMARTIN, Rifleman David. Born in Blaris, before the war he lived with his aunt Isablla Martin in Lisburn, and was employed in William Barbour and Sons mill at Hilden. He enlisted at Lisburn after having got his father’s permission as he was underage, and served in D Company 11 RIR (4732) with three of his uncles. He embarked for France from Bordon in October 1915 and was KIA on the Somme on the 17.6.16 aged 17. According to one of his officers, Captain O.B. Webb who commanded D Company, and wrote to his aunt informing her of his death, he was on a working party in the trenches and, “was caught by a shrapnel bullet which entered his chest in the region of his heart. I am glad to say he felt no pain. He never was conscious and death came quickly. He was a great boy, afraid of nothing, and we all feel his loss very deeply”. CSM John Bell also wrote to Isabella Martin expressing condolences and hoping that, “we may soon be able to avenge him”. He is buried in Authuile Military Cemetery, France row C, grave 20, there is no headstone inscription. He was the son of Sergeant David Martin of 122 Longstone Street, Lisburn and 19 (Reserve) Battalion, RIR, and nephew of Miss Isabella Martin of 20 Hillhall Road, Lisburn. Captain Oswald Brooke Webb was not to survive Martin for long. He died of wounds on the 4.7.16 aged 37. His family were from Randalstown and he is buried in Warloy-Baillon Communal Cemetery Extension Somme, France, plot 3, row B, grave 2.
511MartinJames EdwardRm389411RIRIrishLisburnBelfastLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1916-09-01 00:00:00Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumMARTIN, Rifleman James Edward. Born and living in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 11 RIR (3894). He was KIA in Belgium on the 1.9.16 and his death is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, panel 40. He was the husband of Mrs. S. Martin of Millbrook, Low Road, 26 Sloan Street, and 40 Canal Street, Lisburn with whom he had a small family. On the 15.9.17 his wife included the following poem along with an In Memoriam notice in the Herald . “What peaceful hours I once enjoyed, How sweet their memory still; But they have left an aching void, The world can never fill”.
512MartinThomasPvt2973016YLREnglishRFA 4048CarrickfergusBelfastLisburnHomeBelfastDied1916-09-27 00:00:00Belfast City CemeteryMARTIN, Private Thomas. Born in Carrickfergus, he enlisted at Belfast, originally serving in RFA (4048) he transferred to 16 (Transport Workers) battalion YLR (29730). He died at “home” on the 27.9.16 and is buried in Belfast City Cemetery, plot O, grave 200. He was the husband of Eleen Martin of 1 Poplar Vale, Antrim Road, Lisburn.
513MartinHenryPvt901212KLREnglishRIR 663LisburnBelfastLisburnGreeceSalonikaDOW1918-01-05 00:00:00Salonika, Lembet Road, Military Cemetery, GreeceMARTIN, Private Henry. Born and living in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in the RIR (663) before transferring to 2 Garrison battalion KLR (9012). He died in Salonica on the 5.1.18 and is buried in Salonika (Lembet Road) Military Cemetery, Greece, grave 1337.
514MartinEric FranklinPvt47904MGC(C)Support2/1FFYDublinFlixton PkLisburnBelfastMiddle EastMesopotamiaDied/drowned1918-10-28 00:00:0028Basra Memorial, IraqMARTIN, Private Eric Franklin. Born in Dublin, he lived in Lisburn, enlisted at Flixton Park and served originally in 2/1 Fife and Forfar Yeomanry, before transferring to 16 Squadron MGC(C) (47904). He was posted missing believed drowned and subsequently confirmed as drowned in Mesopotamia on the 28.10.18 aged 28. His death is commemorated on the Basra Memorial, Iraq, panel 41. He was the son of the Rev. Pierce and Rose Edith Martin of Osborne Park and later 34 Bawnmore Road, Balmoral, Belfast.
515MartinWilliam Henry2Lt6KSLIEnglishHomeH'boroDied1918-11-27 00:00:00St. Malachi's Churchyard, HillsboroughMARTIN, 2nd. Lieutenant William Henry. Served in 9 attached to 6 KSLI. He died on the 27.11.18 and is buried in St. Malachi's churchyard, Hillsborough. Martin, WilliamHenryNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
516MartinDavid JCEFImperialH'boro? DrumloughMARTIN, Corporal David J. He lived at Drumlough, Hillsborough, Co. Down and served in 5 CMR, QR, (110362). He died in France on the 1/2.10.16 and is buried in Regina Trench Cemetery, Grandcourt, France, plot 2, row A, grave 2.
517MasseyArchibaldPvt135589RInFIrishAugherClogherDunmurryFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceMASSEY, Private Archibald. Born in Augher, Co. Tyrone, he lived at Dunmurry, enlisted at Clogher and served in 9 RInF (13558). He was reported wounded and subsequently KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 and his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France pier and face 4 D and 5 B.
518MathersThomas WilliamPvt37252RInFIrishShankillBelfastMoiraFranceSommeKIA1917-04-01 00:00:0022Thiepval Memorial, FranceMATHERS, Private, Thomas William. Born in Shankill, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 2 RInF (3725). KIA on the Somme on the 1.4.17 age 22, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 4 D and 5 B. He was the son of John Mathers of Ballymagarahan, Moira, Co. Down.
519MatierJSgt255012RIRIrishLisburnHomeLisburnDied1920-01-09 00:00:0031Lisburn CemeteryMATIER Sergeant J. Served in 12 RIR (2550). He died at “home” on the 9.1.20 age 31 and is buried in Lisburn Cemetery, grave E 100. He was the son of John and Mary Ann Matier and husband of Margaret Matier of 49 Antrim Street, Lisburn.
520MatthewsWilliamRm61742RIRIrishLisburnHollywoodLisburnFranceSommeKIA1918-03-24 00:00:0019Pozieres Memorial, FranceMATTHEWS, Rifleman William. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Hollywood and served in 2 RIR (6174). KIA on the Somme on the 24.3.18 aged 19, his death is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, France. He was the son of Patrick and Lucy Matthews of 6 Chapel Hill, Lisburn.
521MaxwellRalphSgt1326815RIRIrishBelfastBelfastBelfastHomeLondon/SommeDOW1916-08-11 00:00:0027Derriaghy Parish Church GraveyardMAXWELL, Sergeant Ralph. Born in Belfast on the 6.5.1889, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 15 RIR (13268). Wounded on the Somme on the 1.7.16, he DoW in London on the 11.8.16 aged 27. Buried in Derriaghy parish church graveyard “with full military honours” in the same grave as his grandparents, parents, aunt, uncle and cousin, he was the son of Ralph Maxwell who died on the 10.5.18 aged 63, and Jane Maxwell who died on the 25.6.49 aged 93. His parents lived at 88 Everton Street, Belfast. Maxwell, RalphNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
522McAllisterJamesPvt151518RInFIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-09-06 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcALLISTER, Private James. Born in and enlisting at Lisburn, where he lived, he served in 8 RInF (15151). KIA on the Somme on the 6.9.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial France, pier and face 4D or 5B.
523McBrideRobertRm92461RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnFranceLensKIA1915-03-10 00:00:0029Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg-l'Avoue, FranceMcBRIDE, Rifleman Robert. Born in and enlisted at Lisburn, he served in 1 RIR (9246). KIA in France on the 10.3.15 aged 29, his death is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg-l'Avoue, France, panels 42 and 43. He was the son of Edward and Annie McBride of 28 Millbrook Road, Low Road, Lisburn.
524McBrideAndrewRm1520210RIRIrishLisburnBelfastLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0024Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcBRIDE, Rifleman Andrew. Born in Lisburn, he lived at 46 Antrim Street in the town, enlisted at Belfast and served in 10 RIR (15202). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 24, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, faces A/B. He was the son of James McBride of Lisburn, and the late Margaret Ann McBride. He was also survived by his son Thomas.
525McBrideDanielRm58452RIRIrishBallylusonBelfastBallyaughlis, LisburnBallyaughlis, LisburnBelgiumPoperingheDOW1917-08-12 00:00:00Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, BelgiumMcBRIDE, Rifleman Daniel. Born at Ballylesson, Co. Down, he lived at Ballyaughlis, Lisburn, enlisting at Belfast, served in 2 RIR (5845) and DoW in Belgium on the 12.8.17. He is buried in Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Poperinge, Belgium, plot 3, row E, grave 24. He was the eldest son of Hugh McBride of Ballyaughlis, Lisburn.
526McBrideAlexRm1819112RIRIrish11 RIR?BallykeelLisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumOtherKIA1918-10-23 00:00:0033Ingoyghem Military Cemetery, BelgiumMcBRIDE, Rifleman Alex. Born in Ballykeel Co. Down, he lived in Lisburn where he enlisted, possibly in 11 RIR. He may have embarked with them for France from Bordon in October in 1915 and subsequently transferred to 12 RIR (18191) when 11 RIR were disbanded. Reported wounded in early May 1918 he had in fact been KIA in Belgium on the 23.10.18 aged 33, he is buried in Ingoyghem Military Cemetery, Belgium, row C, grave 11. He was the son of Alexander and Martha McBride of 22 Old Hillsborough Road, Lisburn.
527McBrideRRmMcBRIDE, Rifleman R. Commemorated on Lisburn and Lisburn Cathedral War Memorials, there is no positive trace so far.
528McCabeWilliam HenryPvt192521BRScottishArmaghGlasgowHowwood, RenfrewHowwood/LambegTurkeyGallipoliDOW1915-06-29 00:00:00Helles Memorial, GallipoliMcCABE, Private William Henry. Born in Armagh, he lived with his wife in Howwood, Renfrew. They had no children. Enlisting in Glasgow he served in 1 BR (19252), the same battalion as his brother John McCabe, above. He Dow in Gallipoli on the 29.6.15 and his death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panels 119-125 or 222-223. He was the son of Mr. And Mrs. McCabe of 1 Green Hill, Lambeg. His sister was married to Private Joseph McMordie from the Low Road who had enlisted in the Motor Transport Corps. He appears to have survived the war.
529McCabeRobert DanielRm1819611RIRIrishMoyLisburnLambegLambegHomeLambegDOW1917-10-18 00:00:0027Lambeg Church of Ireland ChurchyardMcCABE, Rifleman Robert Daniel. Born in Moy, Co. Armagh, he lived at Lambeg, where he was employed at the Lambeg Weaving Company. A member of the Orange, Black and Rechabite Orders, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 11 RIR (18196) with whom he embarked for France from Bordon in October 1915. Wounded at the front in September or early October 1917, he was brought back to hospital in England where he was operated on, returned home to Lisburn and discharged. However, about ten days later on the 18.10.17, he died at the County Antrim Infirmary in Lisburn “from the effects of gas poisoning and internal injuries received on active service” He was 27 years old. Buried in Lambeg Parish Church graveyard on Saturday the 20 October 1917, the headstone inscription reads, “Until the day break and the shadows flee away”. He was the seventh son of Henry and Jane McCabe of 3 Green Hill, Lambeg, Co. Down and was one of four brothers who joined the army. At the time of his death, two of them had already been discharged. The fourth, Jack McCabe, who was also serving with the Rifles, arrived home on leave on the day that Robert died. Another brother Sam “was involved in transport work”.
530McCabe alias KilpatrickJohnLcpl92321BRScottishMay, Co. ArmaghCarlisleLisburnLambegEgyptGallipoliDOW1915-05-12 00:00:0039Chatby Military War and Memorial Cemetery, Alexandria, EgyptKILPATRICK, Lance Corporal John. Born in May, Co. Armagh, he lived in Lisburn, enlisted at Carlisle and served in 1 BR (9232). He DoW received at Gallipoli on the 12.5.15 age 39 and is buried in Alexandria (Chatby) Military and War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt, row A, grave 140. He was the husband of Mrs. E. McCabe (formerly Kilpatrick) of 5 Carman’s Row, Lambeg, Lisburn.
McCabeJohnLcpl8BRScottish1 BRLambegLambegEgyptGallipoliDOW20/8/1915McCABE, Lance Corporal John.  He lived at Carman’s Row, Lambeg with his wife and three children and DoW in Gallipoli sometime before the 20.8.15 while serving in 1 BR, the same battalion as his brother William Henry McCabe, below. The son of Mr. And Mrs. McCabe of 1 Green Hill, Lambeg, his sister was married to Private Joseph McMordie from the Low Road who had enlisted in the Motor Transport Corps. He appears to have survived the war. There is no trace of John McCabe in the CWGC register, WOCL or IMR although the CWGC and WOCL have a Sergeant James McCabe.  Born in Workington, Cumberland, he enlisted at Darlington, Co. Durham and served in 8 BR (12232). He DoW in Belgium on the 3.8.17 and his death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate, Memorial, Belgium, panel 35. However, he does not feature in IMR.
531McCallaJamesSgt3SAEF InfantryImperialRCRCargygrayPotchefstroom, S.A.Canada/South AfricaCargygrayHomeCargygrayDied1918-11-29 00:00:0038Glebe Churchyard, Annahilt McCALLA, Sergeant James C. From Cargygray, Hillsborough, Co. Down, he served in the South African Infantry. There is no further trace so far.McCalla, JamesPat Geary/ Bailey Family Tree Ancestry
532McCanceFinlay2Lt2BWScottishDunmurryFranceRearDOW1915-05-22 00:00:0023Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, FranceMcCANCE, Second Lieutenant Finlay. Served in 2 BR, he DoW in France on the 22.5.15 age 23 and is buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, Pas De Calais, France, plot 2, row A, grave 19. He was the eldest son of J. Stouppe McCance and Mary McCance of Woodbourne, Dunmurry, Co. Antrim. McCance, FinlayNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
533McCannJames HenryRm113312RIRIrishBlarisLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-09 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcCANN, Rifleman James Henry. Born in Blaris, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Lisburn, and served in 2 RIR (11331). KIA on the Somme on the 9.7.16, his battalion was part of the 25th. Division which was involved in the attack on Ovillers. His death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15A/B.
534McCannJohn WilliamRm6118RIRIrishDunmurryBelfastCraigavadFranceCambraiKIA1917-11-23 00:00:0019Cambrai Memorial, Louverval Military Cemetery, FranceMcCANN, Rifleman John William. Born in Dunmurry, he enlisted at Belfast and served in C Company 8 RIR (611). KIA in France on the 23.11.17 age 19, his death is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, Nord, France, panel 10. He was the son of William and lsabella McCann of Glencraig, Craigavad, Co. Down, and brother of Henry McCann, above.
535McCannThomasPvt130298KRIHIrishLisburnBelfastLambegFranceSommeKIA1918-03-31 00:00:00Pozieres Memorial, FranceMcCANN, Private Thomas. Born in Lisburn, he lived in Lambeg, and had served in the Boer War. He re-enlisted at Belfast at the start of the war and served in 8 KRIH (13029). KIA in France on the 31.3.18, his death is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, France, panels 3-4 or 13-14. He had two brothers serving and two discharged.
536McCannEdwardRm1820212RIRIrishA Co.11 RIR?LisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1918-10-16 00:00:0021Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumMcCANN, Rifleman Edward. Born in Lisburn, he lived on the Old Hillsborough Road in the town, enlisted at Lisburn, and served in A Company 11 RIR with whom he embarked for France from Bordon in October 1915. Wounded on the Somme on the 1.7.16 and subsequently transferred to 12 RIR (18202) he was KIA in Belgium on the 16.10.18 aged 21. His death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium, panels 138-140. He was the son of David and Maggie McCann of 5 Laganside Terrace, Old Hillsborough Road, Lisburn, Co. Down. David McCann worked at Messrs. Robert Stewart and Sons.
537McCannDavidPvt29074MGC(I)Support4904 RIRLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumOtherKIA1918-10-22 00:00:0023Harlebeke New British Cemetery, BelgiumMcCANN, Private David. Born in Lisburn, he lived in Longstone Street in the town. A reservist in the RIR, he enlisting at Lisburn, he was served in that regiment (4904) before transferring to the MGC (29074). Wounded three times before the end of 1916, he was KIA in Belgium on the 22.10.18 aged 23 and is buried in Harlebeke New British Cemetery, Belgium, plot 4, row C, grave 6. He was the son of Mrs. Mary Jane McCann of 5 Millview, Chapel Hill, Lisburn. He had two brothers serving as well.McCann, DavidNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
538McCannHenryPvt592718LCSupport13 RIR18201DunmurryHolywoodBelfastCraigavadHomeAghaleeDied1918-11-10 00:00:0024Aghalee Cemetery, County Antrim McCANN, Private Henry. Born in Dunmurry, he lived in Belfast, enlisted at Holywood and served in 13 RIR (18201). Subsequently transferred to the LC (592718) he died at “home” on the 10.11.18 age 24 and is buried in Aghalee Cemetery, County Antrim near the North-East boundary. He was the son of William and Isabella McCann of Glencraig, Craigavad, Co. Down, and brother of John William McCann, below.
539McCannThompsonRIRIrishLisburn?McCANN, Thompson. Served in the RIR. He is commemorated on Aghalee (Holy Trinity) Parish Church War Memorial, however, there is no positive trace so far.
540McCarrollThomas JohnPvt50351RMFIrish14355 RInFLisburnBelfastBelfastBelfastFranceSommeKIA1918-06-28 00:00:0026Couin New British Cemetery, FranceMcCARROLL, Private Thomas John. Born in Lisburn, he was a member of Derriaghy Parish Church and lived at Belfast where he enlisted. He served in the RInF (14355) before transferring to 1 RMF (5035). Wounded in Gallipoli, on his recovery he was sent to France where he was wounded again on the 24 March 1918. KIA in France on the 28.6.18 a week after returning to the trenches, he was 26 years old. He is buried in Couin New British Cemetery, France, row C, grave 1. The son of Mary McCarroll of 14 Colchester Street, Donegall Road, Belfast, one of his officers described him as, “one of the very best men in the Company, and one whom I will find it hard to replace. He was always cheerful and did his work splendidly”.
541McCartanThomasPvt209618RIrFIrishCR 4113AghagallonBelfastLurganGlenavy?FranceLensKIA1916-04-03 00:00:0025Dud Corner Cemetery, Loos, FranceMcCARTAN, Private Thomas. Born in Aghagallon, Co. Antrim, (about a mile south west of Aghalee on the road to Lurgan), he lived in Lurgan, enlisted at Belfast and served in 8 RIrF (20961). KIA in France on the 3.4.16 aged 25, he is buried in Dud Corner Cemetery, Loos, France, plot 2, row H, grave 4. He was the husband of Cecelia McCartan of Deerpark, Gawley’s Gate, Lurgan, Co. Armagh and son of John and Mary McCartan. His death is also commemorated on the family headstone in Glenavy, St. Joseph’s RC church graveyard where John McCartan who died 25.7.1931 aged 75? years and Mary McCartan who died on the 24.5.1946 are buried. They also lost three other children at relatively early ages though none as a result of the war. These were their son John on the 20.11.1918 aged 20, a daughter Agnes on the 13.1.1919 aged 18 and another son Bernard on the 20.4.1925 aged 22. The family headstone also records the death of Helena McCartan on the 17.11.1979 aged 83, though the family relationship is not given.
542McCarterRobertSgt11/1812911RIRIrish18 RIRTemplemoreLisburnLisburnHomeLisburnDied/accident1916-04-15 00:00:0043Lisburn CemeteryMcCARTER, Sergeant Robert. Born in Templemore, Co. Derry, he had been foreman printer/compositor for the Lisburn Herald for a number of years before the war. A “strong Unionist,” secretary of LOL 128 and member of the local battalion of the UVF, he had “some military experience”. On the outbreak of the war he enlisted in 11 RIR (18129) at Lisburn, was given his old rank of Corporal and attached to the clerical staff. He went with his battalion to Seaford and then to Borden Camp at Aldershot. However, because of his age, he was transferred to 18 RIR (11/18129) at Clandeboye and promoted to sergeant when the Ulster Division left for France early in October 1915. It was from there that he wrote to his wife in April 1916 saying that he would be home on leave on Saturday the 15th. He was never to arrive. That evening he was found lying unconscious on the “permanent way” of the Great Northern Railway at Belfast Station about 20 minutes after the departure of the 7.30 train for Lisburn. Taken immediately to the Military Hospital, Victoria Barracks, Belfast, he was found to have several broken ribs on the left hand side of his chest and bruises on his chest and arms. He died at 9.30 on the evening of the 15.4.16 aged 43 “from shock” caused by internal injuries. Buried with full military honours in Lisburn Cemetery, Old section, plot B, grave 227 on Tuesday 18 April, the headstone inscription reads, “At the rivers crystal brink Christ shall join each broken link”. He was the husband of Mary Ann McCarter of 52 Hill Street, Lisburn. They had nine children ranging from 3 to 18 years of age. Exactly what had happened to Robert McCarter was never fully established. An inquest into his death was held in Victoria Barracks on Monday 17 April and was continued at the GNR station in Belfast on Thursday 20 April so that the jury would have an opportunity to examine the scene of the accident and in particular inspect the lighting. After “a prolonged absence” to consider the evidence, they returned the verdict that death was the result of “injuries caused by a train being shunted out of No. 3 platform”, at the same time, expressing the opinion that “the railway officials did not give satisfactory evidence as to how McCarter met his death”. They were particularly critical of William Pearson, a carriage examiner at the station who had found McCarter. In their view he “did not act humanely”. The GNR was also criticised “for not taking proper precautions”.
543McCarthyRobertSgt65282IGIrishLurganureDublinKnockmore, LisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-09-15 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcCARTHY, Sergeant Robert, M.M. Born in Lurganure, Co. Down, he lived at Knockmore, Co. Antrim and served his apprenticeship as a printer in the office of the Lisburn Herald before joining the RIC. At the time of the outbreak of the war he was stationed at the Cullingtree Road Barracks in Belfast. He enlisted in 2 IG (6528), at Dublin, being amongst the first policemen to join that regiment. Involved in “several fierce battles”, he was rapidly promoted and was awarded the MM “for conspicuous bravery in carrying ammunition to his men during a heavy engagement and carrying a wounded officer off the field”. However, he did not survive long enough to receive his award. Shortly after the action for which he was decorated, he took part in a raid on a German trench from which he never returned. Originally reported as missing, he was subsequently in March 1917, listed as KIA on the Somme in France on the 15.9.16. His death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 7D. He was the son of Mrs. M.A. McCarthy of Knockmore, Lisburn who received her son’s Military Medal in March 1917 and brother of Thomas McCarthy who served in the RAMC. He appears to have survived the war.
544McCarthyJohnCSM1501548CEF CORImperial79H'boroBrandon, ManitobaH'boroFranceArras1917-04-28 00:00:0028Vimy Memorial, FranceMcCARTHY, CSM John. Born in Hillsborough, Co. Down on the 21.09.1888, he was a policeman with 3 years service in the RIC. A single man with no previous military experience he joined up at Brandon, Manitoba, Canada on the 24.07.1915. 6’2” tall, he had a 39½” chest fully expanded with 3’ expansion, fair complexion, blue eyes and fair hair. Passed fit for overseas service on the 1.9.1915 he was posted to the 79 Overseas Battalion, CEF and later to 8 COR, CEF (150154). He died in France on the 28.4.17 aged 28 and is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial, France. He was the son of Jane McCarthy and the late John R. McCarthy of Corcreeny, Hillsborough, Co. Down.
545McCartneyRobert LawRm103101RIRIrishLisburnBelfastFranceLensKIA1915-03-11 00:00:00Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg-l'Avoue, FranceMcCARTNEY, Rifleman Robert Law. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RIR (10310). KIA in France on the 11.3.15, his death is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, France.
546McCartneyMatthewRm23182RIRIrishBlarisBallykinlarBelgiumYpresKIA1915-06-16 00:00:00Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumMcCARTNEY, Rifleman Matthew. Born in Blaris, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Ballykinlar, Co. Down and served in 2 RIR (2318). KIA in Belgium on the 16.6.15, his death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate, Memorial, Belgium, panel 40.
547McCartneyWilliam JamesSgt12557RIRIrishPurdeysburnDublinBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-16 00:00:00Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumMcCARTNEY, Sergeant William James. Born in Purdeysburn, he enlisted at Dublin and served in 7 RIR (1255). KIA in Belgium on the 16.8.17, his death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Zonnebeke, Belgium, panels 138 to 140, 162 to 162A and 163A.
548McCaughertyArchibaldRm1963713RIRIrishHilltownBelfastLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0026Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcCAUGHERTY, Rifleman Archibald. Born in Hilltown, Co. Down, he lived at Lisnatrunk, Lisburn, enlisted at Belfast and served in 13 RIR (19637). Reported missing and subsequently, in May or June 1917, confirmed as having been KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 26, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A/B. He was the eldest son of William James and Margaret McCaugherty of Hillhall Meeting House Lane, Lisburn. McCaugherty, ArchibaldNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
549McCaughertySamuelRm106542RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumPloegsteertDOW1917-06-07 00:00:00St. Quentin Cabaret Military Cemetery, Ploegsteert, BelgiumMcCAUGHERTY, Rifleman Samuel. Born and living in Lisburn at 5 Quay Street with his parents, before the war he was employed at E. Doherty & Sons, boot merchants in the town. He enlisted at Lisburn and served in 2 RIR (10654). He DoW in Belgium on the 7.6.17 and is buried in St. Quentin Cabaret Military Cemetery, Ploegsteert, Belgium, plot 2, row L, grave 6. McCaugherty, SamuelNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
550McCauleyRobertRm1820711RIRIrishDunmurryLisburnDunmurryDunmurryFranceSommeDOW1916-06-17 00:00:0020Warloy-Baillon Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceMcCAULEY, Rifleman Robert. Born and living in Dunmurry, he was a member of the UVF. He enlisted at Lisburn and served in 11 RIR (18207) embarking with them for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. He DoW on the Somme on the 17.6.16 age 20 and is buried in Warloy-Baillon Communal Cemetery Extension, Somme, France, plot 3, row A, grave 7. He was the son of the late James McCauley and Mary Elizabeth McConnell (formerly McCauley) of 2 Hill Street, Dunmurry, Belfast, and nephew of Alexander Bruce of Railway Street, Dunmurry. A rifleman Roger M’Ilroy who served in 11 RIR and appears to have survived the war, also lived at 3 Hill Street, Dunmurry with his wife. He worked for Riddell and Co., Donegall Place, Belfast and was a member of the McCartney Flute Band, Dunmurry. McCauley, RobertNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
551McCleanJoseph HenryPvt295369RIrFIrishLisburnBelfastBelfastFranceRearDOW1918-09-13 00:00:0019Arneke British Cemetery, FranceMcCLEAN, Private Joseph Henry. Born in Lisburn, he lived at Brookhill, enlisted at Belfast and served in 9 RIrF (29536). He DoW in France on the 13.9.18 aged 19 from wounds received on the 4 September and is buried in Arneke British Cemetery, France, plot 7, row A, grave 13. He was the son of William and Catherine McClean of 78 Frome Street, Belfast.
552McClearyWilliamPvt34821RInFIrishBroomhedgeBelfastBelfastBelgiumYpresKIA1916-08-09 00:00:0022Potijze Chateau Wood Cemetery, YpresMcCLEARY, Private William. Born in Broomhedge, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RInF (3482). KIA in Belgium on the 9.8.16 age 22 he is buried in Potijze Chateau Wood Cemetery, Ypres, row F, grave 1. He was the son of Mrs. A. McCleery of 23 City Street, Belfast.
553McCleerySamuelPvt17692MGC(1)Support11? RIR 6457CorcreenyClandeboyeCorcreenyFranceRearDied1916-07-19 00:00:00Longuenesse Souvenir Cemetery, St. Omer, FranceMcCLEERY, Private Samuel. Born and living in Corcreeny, Co. Down, he enlisted at Clandeboye and served in RIR (6457), possibly the 11th battalion, with whom he may have embarked for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Subsequently transferred to 108 Co. MGC(I) (19762) he died in France on the 19.7.16 and is buried in Longuenesse Souvenir Cemetery, St. Omer, France, plot 4, row A, grave 2.
554McCluneWilliamPvt12773RIrFIrish5679 RIRLambegBelfastHomeBelfastDied1918-08-15 00:00:0048Belfast City CemeteryMcCLUNE, Private William. Born in Lambeg, he enlisted at Belfast and served in the RIR (5679), subsequently transferring to 3 RIrF (1277). He died at “home” on the 15.8.18 aged 48 and is buried in Belfast City Cemetery. He was the son of the late John and Elizabeth McClune.
555McClureThomas JamesRm1670111RIRIrishLisburnBelfastLisburnLisburnBelgiumPloegsteertKIA/gas1916-09-01 00:00:0020Ration Farm, La Plus Douve Cemetery Annex, Ploegsteert, BelgiumMcCLURE, Rifleman Thomas James (Tom). Born and living in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 11 RIR (16701) with whom he embarked for France from Bordon in October 1915. Killed by gas on the 1.9.16 aged 20, he is buried in Ration Farm, Le Plus Douve Cemetery annex, Ploegsteert, Belgium, plot 2, row C, grave 24. This is the same grave number as Rifleman William Lamont (above) although they have separate headstones set side by side. It is also next to Bugler Sam Ward (below) who died the same day. Both served in 11 RIR. There is no headstone inscription. Some other 1.9.16 casualties may also have been killed by gas, and are buried in Bailleul Cemetery which is just over the Franco-Belgium border. He was the son of Sarah and the late Lazey McClure of 88 Hillhall Road, Lisburn and husband of Margaret (Maggie) McClure who lived at 25 Ballynahinch Road, Lisburn with her parents William and Catherine McConnell. They had a child. His brothers-in-law Joseph McConnell, 11 RIR, and Corporal R. McConnell 2 RIR (5141) also lived there. According to the Standard, Corporal McConnell “was wounded in 1915 and admitted to No. 1 General Hospital, Etaples, France on the 29 September 1915. He had been wounded in the big forward movement which commenced the previous day. He is making splendid recovery from his wounds so good indeed that he has been transferred to an hospital in Manchester”. A year later he was serving in Salonica, having risen to the rank of Sergeant. By then too Joseph McConnell had been wounded and was in hospital in Glasgow. On the 1 September 1917 a series of five In Memoriam notices to Tom McClure appeared in the Herald. All refer to the fact that he was killed by gas and all contain poems. From his wife, Maggie. “I do not forget thee Tom, nor do I intend. I loved you daily, and will to the end; If the grave were to open, what changes you’d see, But eternal rest is better for thee”. And from his mother, “Short was thy life my dearest son, But peaceful is thy rest; Mother misses you most of all, Because she loved you best”.
556McClureGeorgeRm6216RIRIrishMoiraLurganMoiraH'boroBelgiumPoperingheKIA1918-04-16 00:00:0024Canada Farm Cemetery, BelgiumMcCLURE, Rifleman George. Born and living in Moira, Co. Down, he enlisted at Lurgan and served in 16 RIR (62). He was KIA in Belgium on the 16.4.18 age 24 and is buried in Canada Farm Cemetery, Belgium, plot 4, row A, grave 35. This is next but one to Fred Law (above) who was also in 16 RIR. He was the son of John and Jane McClure of Hillsborough, Co. Down. McClure, GeorgeNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
557McClurgAdamRm1673311RIRIrishDerriaghyBelfastMilltownFranceSommeKIA1916-06-27 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcCLURG, Rifleman Adam. Born in Derriaghy, Co. Antrim, he lived at Milltown, Co. Antrim, and was a member of Sommerhill LOL 137. He enlisted at Belfast and served in 11 RIR (16733) with whom he embarked for France from Bordon in October 1915. KIA on the Somme on the 27.6.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.
558McCombWilliam ThomasRm17/98010RIRIrishDerriaghy?BelfastBelfastFranceSommeKIA1915-12-22 00:00:0017Sucrerie Military Cemetery, Colincamps, FranceMcCOMB, Rifleman William Thomas. Born in Derriaghy, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 10 RIR (17/980). KIA on the Somme on the 22.12.15 aged 17, he is buried in Sucrerie Military Cemetery, Colincamps, France, plot 2, row D, grave 7. The headstone inscription reads, “God is love”. He was the son of Joseph and Ada McComb of 36 Coolbeg Street, Donegall Road, Belfast.
559McCombRRm90393RIRIrishLisburnHomeLisburnDOW1917-01-11 00:00:0043Lisburn CemeteryMcCOMB, Rifleman R. Served in 3 RIR (9039). He DoW on the 11.1.17 aged 43 and is buried in Lisburn Cemetery, new row D, grave 53. He was the husband of Mary Ann McComb of 6 Barrack Lane, Lisburn. The headstone inscription reads, “Gone but not forgotten. In loving memory of my dear husband. Died from wounds”.
560McComiskeyJohnRm153739RIRIrishLisburnBelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcCOMISKEY, Rifleman John. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 9 RIR (15373). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, faces A/B.
561McComiskeyJohn PatrickPvt21787LRIrishLisburnBelfastLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-09-09 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcCOMISKEY, Private John Patrick. Born and living in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 7 LR (2178). In February/March 1915 he was stationed in Killworth Camp, Co. Cork from where he, and possibly Francis McGreevy (below), wrote to the secretary of Lisburn Catholic Club thanking the members for sending him tobacco and cigarettes. KIA on the Somme on the 9.9.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 16C. McComiskey, JohnPatrickNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
562McConkeyChristopher EvansCiv/WtrSS LusitaniaMMMerchant NavyH'boroLiverpoolAt SeaOff Souttern IrelandKilled/drowned1915-05-07 00:00:0045Tower Hill Memorial, LondonMcCONKEY, 2nd Class Waiter, Christopher Evans. Born in Hillsbrough, Co. Down, he served in the Mercantile Marine on the S.S. "Lusitania". He drowned as a result of an attack by an enemy submarine on the 7.5.15 age 45, and his death is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. He was the son of the late John and Bessie McConkey and husband of Annie McConkey (nee Peirce) of 25 St. Ambrose Grove, Liverpool.
563McConnellHerbert IsaacPvtSE/2136Depot WoolwichRAVCSupportMaralinLondonMoira/Newton-on-AyrHomeBirminghamDied1916-05-16 00:00:0051Birmingham (Lodge Hill) Cemetery, WarwickshireMcCONNELL, Private Herbert Isaac. Born in Maralin, Co. Down, he enlisted at London and served in RAVC Depot, Woolwich (SE/2136). He died at “home” on the 16.5.16 age 51 and is buried in Birmingham (Lodge Hill) Cemetery, Warwickshire, plot B10, row 4, grave 341. He was the son of Arthur and Elizabeth McConnell of Moira, Co. Down, and husband of Elizabeth Eva McConnell of 28 Taylor Street, Newtown-on-Ayr.
564McConnellHarold JeffreyLt98 SqdnRAFAir ForcePublic Schools battalion and 5 RIRLisburn/USABelgiumYpres1918-05-31 00:00:0024Larch Wood (Railway Cutting) Cemetery, Ypres, BelgiumMcCONNELL  Lieutenant Harold Jeffrey. An employee of Cox’s Bank, Charing Cross, London, he joined up as a private in the Public Schools Battalion at the start of the war. Subsequently given a commission in 5 RIR (a training battalion) who were stationed at the Palace Barracks, Hollywood, he was sent to the front in May 1916 and was wounded in late June or early July that year. Transferred to 98 Squadron RAF he died on the 31.5.18 age 24 and is buried in Larch Wood (Railway Cutting) Cemetery, Ypres, Belgium, plot 1, row B, grave 15. He was the son of the late William and Mary McConnell of Lisnastrain, Lisburn and Spokane, Washington, U.S.A., nephew of Thomas McConnell, of Ballinderry and cousin of John T. McConnell, solicitor, of Lisburn.
565McConnellWesleyRm239916RIRIrishBesbrookLurganLisburnBelgiumOtherKIA1918-09-30 00:00:00Dadizeele New British Cemetery, BelgiumMcCONNELL, Rifleman Wesley. Born in Besbrook, Co. Armagh, he enlisted at Lurgan, and served in 16 RIR (2399). KIA in Belgium on the 30.9.18, he is buried in Dadizeele New British Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium, plot 5, row A, grave 22. He was the brother of Miss E. McConnell of Castleview, Lisburn.
566McCordJosephGnr48238RGASupportBallinderryBelfastHomeDoverDied1915-10-06 00:00:00Dover (St. Jamesös) Cemetery, KentMcCORD, Gunner Joseph. Born in Ballinderry, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 40 Company RGA (48238). He died in hospital in Dover on the 6.10.15 and is buried in Dover (St. James’s) Cemetery, Kent, grave LK 24.
567McCordThomas BuntingSgt4146118HLIScottishBallinderryLeicesterBallinderryBallinderryBelgiumYpresKIA1918-09-30 00:00:0035Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumMcCORD, Sergeant Thomas (Tom) Bunting MM. Born and living in Ballinderry Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Leicester and served in 18 (4th Glasgow battalion) HLI (41461). KIA in Belgium on the 30.9.18 age 35, his death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot memorial, Belgium, panels 131-132 and on the family headstone in Ballinderry Presbyterian church graveyard. He was the son of Elizabeth (Eliza) McCord of The Weir, Ballinderry, Lisburn, Co. Antrim who died on the 20.6.35 aged 89, and the late George McCord who died on the 20.7.06 aged 74. He also had two sisters who died in the Belgian Congo. Florence E. on the 12.8.20 aged 34 and Lucy W. who died at Todoa in the Congo on the 3.11.40 aged 52. The headstone inscription reads, “They rest from their labours and thy works do follow them”. Could the sisters have been missionaries? A brother George Richard who died on the 2.4.69 aged 92 and his wife Lillie Susan 14.4.65 aged 88 are also buried in the family plot in the churchyard.
568McCormackCampbell McNeillMaj5FARAMCSupportDrumboLisburnFranceOtherKIA1918-09-22 00:00:0027Barastre Communal Cemetery, Pas de Calais, FranceMcCORMACK, Major (Doctor) Campbell McNeill MC and 2 bars. Educated initially at the Carr and Ballymacbrennan National Schools, he won a scholarship to Lisburn Intermediate School, subsequently Wallace High School, where he won exhibitions in the junior, middle and senior schools, and then an entrance scholarship of £30 to QUB to study medicine. He qualified as a doctor in June 1914 and, having been in the OTC at Queens, (where he was the best shot in his Company and won four bronze medals for training), joined the Reserve of Officers (RAMC) going to Aldershot at the end of June for preliminary training. On completion of this he was expecting to be able to return home to Drumbo for a short holiday but the outbreak of war intervened. Posted briefly to Dublin, he subsequently embarked for France, with the medical contingent of the Aldershot Division on the night of the 7.8.14. Heavily involved in the retreat from Mons, he “came to prominence for good work bravely performed at Hill 60” a heavily contested area of high ground outside Ypres. Writing home afterwards, he commented that it was, “a miracle more of them did not get knocked out”. He was also mentioned in dispatches, “for gallant and distinguished conduct in the field” in Sir John French’s last dispatch, by which time he had been promoted to the rank of Captain. Awarded the MC in September 1916, the citation published in the London Gazette read, “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during operations. He directed the stretcher-bearers under heavy shellfire with the greatest coolness and courage. He succeeded in entering a village which had been heavily shelled, and, with another captain, a sergeant and four men, collected the wounded into a dug-out and succeeded in getting them back later. He has frequently shown great courage.”

He was married to Ella Todd Warnock of Fernleigh, Endsleigh Drive, Belfast, in Drumbo Presbyterian Church on Wednesday the 12 September 1917. She was the only daughter of the late Rev. James Warnock formerly minister of Drumbo and of Kroonstad, South Africa where he had gone for the sake of his health. One of the ministers officiating was the Rev. Joseph Cordner who may have been the father of James Cordner above, who was KIA in April 1918. The best man was Hugh McCormack the bridegroom’s brother who was later to have Campbell’s death commemorated on his own headstone, and the bride was given away by her uncle Mr. Christopher Todd. The reception was held at Fernleigh, the home of the bride and Mrs. Crail, her aunt, before the couple left for their honeymoon at Mallaranny, Co. Galway and Recess and Co. Galway. The gifts which the couple exchanged were a gold ring set with diamonds and a leather travelling case with solid silver fittings, while the officers and men of 15 Field Ambulance gave them a silver salver. From Campbell McCormack’s parents, they received a hand embroidered bedspread and from Christopher Todd, a cheque for £100.

Slightly wounded in late August or early September 1918, he was KIA in France on the 22.9.1918 two days after coming out of hospital and just over a year after his marriage. He was 27 years old and was serving in the 5th (or possibly 15th) Field Ambulance RAMC. He is buried in Barastre Communal cemetery, Pas de Calsis, France, grave 11. (Barastre lies about 6 Km. SE of Bapaume between the Somme and Cambrai battlefields). He was the youngest son of William McCormack, a farmer, and Mrs. McCormack of Hillhall House, Lisburn, Co. Down. His death is also commemorated on his brother’s (H.H. McCormack’s) headstone in Drumbo Presbyterian Church graveyard. He (H.H. McC) died on the 12.8.80.

In a letter to his parents shortly after his death, Major F.R. Thornton (RAMC) wrote, “I think by this time you will have received news of Major McCormack’s death yesterday morning. A shell hit the shelter in which he and Colonel Bradley were sleeping and both were killed at once. He was buried yesterday afternoon in the cemetery close by in the presence of all the men of his ambulance who could be spared, and detachments from the other ambulances of the division. The General commanding the Division and many other officers were present. At the special request of the men his body was carried to the grave by the N.C.O.’s of the unit. It is difficult for me to express to you the deep sympathy that I feel, as I realise what a terrible loss it must be to you all. We all feel it most deeply, as he was beloved by officers and men. Of his unselfishness and courage it is needless to speak, for the men would follow him anywhere, or do anything which he asked them to do. I wonder if you have any small photographs of him, I should, myself, so much like one and the other officers are asking for it; in addition if you could let us have a few, I know how deeply some of our N.C.O.’s and men of his section would appreciate them. With my very deepest condolence”.

Frederick Hoysted Bradley  DSO, Lieutenant Colonel attached to the 15th Field Ambulance RAMC who was killed with Campbell McCormack on the 22 September 1918, was 34 years old. He was the son of the Rev. Canon W. H. and Mrs. Bradley of Monaghan and husband of the late Ellen Lacey Hargreaves of Liverpool. He is buried beside McCormack in Barastre Communal Cemetery, France grave 10.

The announcement of the first bar to his MC was made soon after his death. The citation read. “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an important engagement he organised the evacuation of the wounded with great skill and devotion to duty, proceeding frequently himself in charge of bearers, through heavy shelling, to the rear aid posts. It was largely due to his able organisation and fine example of self-sacrificing gallantry that the numerous casualties were evacuated so expeditiously”.

News of a second bar followed shortly after and was reported in the Lisburn Standard on the 25 October. The circumstances surrounding the award were, at that time unknown, although according to the paper, “it is believed he won it when he was wounded about eleven days before his death”. More poignantly though news of it arrived, “on the day that Major McCormack’s infant (still born) and only child was being buried”.

A year after his death his parents had an “In Memoriam” notice published in the Standard, “In sad and loving memory of our dear son”. It finished with a short poem. “We little thought when we last met, That he would n’er return, That he so soon would sleep in death, and leave us here to mourn”.
McCormack, CampbellMcNeillPat Geary/Noel Nash
569McCormickEdwardPvt84261RInFIrishLisburnBelfastTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-05-22 00:00:00Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery, GallipoliMcCORMICK, Private Edward. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 1 RInF (8426). KIA in Gallipoli on the 22.5.15, his death is commemorated on special memorial C 60 in Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery, Helles, Gallipoli.
570McCormickArchibaldRm70442RIRIrishLisburnHollywoodBelgiumYpresKIA1915-06-16 00:00:0022Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumMcCORMICK Rifleman Archibald. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Hollywood, Co. Down and served in D Company 2 RIR (7044). KIA in Belgium on the 16.6.15 aged 22, his death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate, Memorial, Belgium. He was the son of Andrew and Mary Anne McCormick.
571McCoshSamuel OsborneLcpl12/1814512RIRIrishLisburnWhiteabbeyGermanyCasselDied/PoW1918-06-19 00:00:00Niederzwehren Cemetery, Cassel, GermanyMcCOSH, Lance corporal Samuel Osborne. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Whiteabbey and served in 12 RIR (12/18145). Taken prisoner, he died while a PoW in Germany on the 19.6.18 and is buried in Niederzwehren Cemetery, Cassel, Germany, plot 1, row J, grave 16.
572McCrackenJamesRm40815RIRIrishMaralinBelfastMaralinBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-04 00:00:00Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumMcCRACKEN, Rifleman James. Born and living in Maralin, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 15 RIR (408). KIA in Belgium on the 4.8.17, his death is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Ypres, Belgium, panel 40.
573McCreadyGeorgePvtL/63532RSREnglishBelfastGlasgowBelgiumYpresKIA1914-10-30 00:00:00Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumMcCREADY, Private George. Born in Belfast, he enlisted at Glasgow and served in 2 RSR, BEF (L/6353). KIA in Belgium on the 30.10.14 his death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate, Memorial, Belgium, panel 20.
574McCreedyJohnRm62722RIRIrishLisburnBelfastBelgiumYpresKIA1915-05-09 00:00:00Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumMcCREEDY, Rifleman John. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 2 RIR (6272). KIA in Belgium on the 9.5.15 (the same day as R. McGeown, below), his death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate, Memorial, Belgium.
575McCullaghAlexander Henry2Lt11RInFIrishBallinderry/BelfastBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-16 00:00:0021New Irish Farm Cemetery, St. Jean-les-Ypres, BelgiumMcCULLAGH, Second Lieutenant Alexander Henry (Harry). Before the war he had been studying for the Civil Service and was a student at Connell’s Academy, Belfast. He received his commission from the Cadet Force, Fermoy on the 19.12.16, proceeding to the front on the 16.2.17 where he served in 11 RInF attached to 109 Trench Mortar Battery. Reported wounded and MIA and subsequently KIA in Belgium on the 16.8.17 age 21, he is buried in New Irish Farm Cemetery, Ypres, Belgium, plot 7, row D, grave 9. He was the eldest son of William McCullagh of 45 Ponsonby Avenue, Antrim Road, Belfast who was principal of Upper Ballinderry National School. The following poem “In Memory of Second Lieut. Harry McCullagh … killed at an outpost in Flanders” was published in the Standard on the 14.9.17. “His life was like an open flower, Which grew more lovely as it grew; His honest heart was kind and true, A gentle soul with manly power. And many were the bonds, and dear, Which bound him fast to friends and home, And days of love and hope had come, With promise of a bright career. Then came the trumpet-call for men, To fight for Honour, Country, King, And all he loved, each precious thing, He laid upon the alter then. Not lightly was the task assayed, He felt the horror of the war, And knew that death might claim him there, He knew, and yet was not afraid. Then calmly did the youth prepare, For the dread battle-front and go, Where death had laid the bravest low, And sad hearts prayed, “God shield him there.” God sometimes leads us by a road, Dark with the mystery of pain, But when we see the light again, We know the road has led to God. For him the path of duty lay, Across the path of Death; but lo! As all things vanished here below, There dawned the morn of endless day. Above that outpost where he fell, Now shines a rainbow with a cross; Thus o’er the symbol of our loss, We see God’s signal “All is well.” Harry, thy memory will remain, (Though mixed with many a tender smart), A joy in every loving heart, Which knew thee, till we meet again”. McCullagh, AlexanderHenryNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
576McCulloughAndrewRm542262KRRCEnglish11 RIR 18254LisburnLisburnLower Plantation, LisburnLisburnFranceOtherKIA1918-10-19 00:00:00Cross Roads Cemetery, Fontaine-au-Bois, FranceMcCULLOUGH, Rifleman Andrew. Born in Lisburn, he lived at Lower Plantation, Lisburn, and before the war had worked at the Island Mill in the town. A member of the South Antrim Volunteers (UVF), he enlisted in Lisburn at the outbreak of the war and served originally in 11 RIR (18254). Wounded in 1916 he spent the next six months on a home posting. Home on leave in September 1918, he was transferred to 2 KRRC (54226) on his return to the front. Four weeks later he was KIA in France on the 19.10.18. He is buried in Cross Roads Cemetery, Nord, France, plot 3, row B, grave 5. He was the eldest son of Andrew McCullough of Plantation, Lisburn who received the news of his death on the 18 November, one week after the Armistice. McCullough, AndrewNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
577McCurryAlexander2Lt9MGC(I)SupportBelfastBelgiumYpres/Kemmel HillKIA1918-04-25 00:00:0020Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumMcCURRY  Second Lieutenant Alexander. Joined the OTC at Queen's University, Belfast and served in B Company 9 MGC(I). Reported missing at Kemmel Hill and subsequently KIA in Belgium on the 25.4.18 age 20, his death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Zonnebeke, Belgium, panels 154 to 159 and 163A, and on his grandfathers headstone in Magheragall Parish church graveyard. He was the only son of James Isaac and Bessie McCurry of Lisnadill, Osborne Park, Belfast. James Isaac died on the 13.11.46.
578McDonaldWilliamPvt86982RInFIrishAghaleeBelfastBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1914-10-21 00:00:00Ploegsteert Memorial, BelgiumMcDONALD, Private William. Born in Aghalee, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 2 RInF (8698). KIA in Belgium on the 21.10.14, his death is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium, panel 5.
579McDonaldWilliam RobertRm161712RIRIrishBallinderryBelfastCarrickfergusBelfast/KeadyFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0032Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcDONALD, Rifleman William Robert. Born in Ballinderry, Co. Antrim, he lived at Carrickfergus, enlisted at Belfast and served in I2 RIR (1617). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 age 32, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval memorial, France, pier and face 15 A and B. He was the son of Mrs. Fanny Hughes (formerly McDonald) of Rose’s Lane Ends, Belfast and husband of Susan Wilson (formerly McDonald) of Lower Dalky, Keady, Co. Armagh.
580McDowellWilliam GeorgeRm254811RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0020Cerisy-Gailly French National Cemetery, FranceMcDOWELL, Rifleman William George. Born in Blaris, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in D Company 11 RIR (2548) embarking with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. Listed as wounded and missing and subsequently KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 20, he is buried in Cerisy-Gailly French National Cemetery, France, plot 2, row A, grave 11. The headstone inscription reads, “At the river’s crystal brink Christ shall join each broken link”. He was the son of James and Ellen McDowell of 2 New Street, Low Road, Lisburn. New Street was off the Millbrook Road and is now approximately where Millbrook connects to the Queens Road. His brother James McDowell (above) was killed in April 1918.
581McDowellJamesRm92471RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-16 00:00:0028Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumMcDOWELL, Rifleman James. Born in and enlisting at Lisburn, he served in 1 RIR (9247). KIA in Belgium on the 16.8.17 aged 28, his death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium, panels 138-140. He was the son of Joseph and Jane McDowell of 95 Ballynahinch Road, Lisburn.McDowell, JamesEdwardILC&LM
582McDowellErnest VictorPvt255447RIrRIrish1494 SIHDundalkDublinDundalkFranceSommeKIA1918-03-21 00:00:00Pozieres Memorial, FranceMcDOWELL, Private Ernest Victor. Born in Hagggardstown, Dundalk, Co. Louth on the 15.5.1892, he was an old scholar of Friends’ School, Lisburn which he entered on the 17.1.05. His reports between then and his departure on the 20.12.07 were consistently good. He enlisted at Dublin and served in the SIH (1494) before transferring to 7 (South Irish Horse battalion) RIrR (25544). KIA in France on the 21.3.18, his death is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, France, panels 30-1. He was the son of Robert and Jane McDowell from Dundalk.McDowell, ErnestVictorPat Geary/De Ruvignys
583McDowellJamesRm118512RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1918-04-14 00:00:00Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumMcDOWELL, Rifleman James. Born and living in Lisburn, before the war was employed by his father. Volunteering for service, he enlisted at Lisburn in 11 RIR (possibly B or C Company), and may have been wounded or reported MIA on the Somme following the fighting on the 1.7.16. Transferred to 12 RIR (1185) when 11 and then 11/13 RIR were disbanded, he was KIA in Belgium on the 14.4.18. His death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium, panels 138-140. He was the husband of Mrs. McDowell, Lisnoe, Lisburn and son of James and Ellen McDowell of 2 New Street, Low Road, Lisburn. (New Street was off the Millbrook Road and is now approximately where Millbrook connects to the Queens Road). In a letter of consolation to his wife, the Church of Ireland Chaplain to his old battalion wrote, “I knew him well in the old 11th and 11/13th Battalions of the Rifles, and always found him the same in disposition. He was cheerful and obliging in times of difficulty, and gallant and unselfish in the hour of danger. He was a great favourite with officers and men, and quite a personality in his company. We shall all miss him greatly, and feel that we have lost a staunch comrade and brave soldier”. He was the brother of William McDowell (below) who had been KIA on the 1.7.16.
584McDowellJMcDOWELL, Rifleman J. There are between 3 and 5 Riflemen J. McDowells from the area, 3 on Lisburn War Memorial and 1 each on Hilden War memorial and Legacurry Presbyterian Church Memorial. The degree of overlap is unknown and other than the two others shown on the casualty list, there is no positive trace so far.
585McElmurrayHenry ArchieStkK/42019HMS PartridgeRNNavyStoneyfordAt SeaNorth SeaKIA/drowned1917-12-12 00:00:0021Portsmouth Naval Memorial, HampshireMcELMURRAY, Stoker 2nd Class Henry Archie. Served in the Royal Navy (K/42019) on HMS Partridge. KIA while protecting a convoy in the North Sea on the 12.12.17 age 21, his death is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire, panel 26. He was the son of Charles and Maggie McElmurray of Mullaghglass, Stoneyford, Lisburn, Co. Antrim.
586McEvoyFrancisAcm552193 DepotRAFAir ForceDromaraFranceAisne1919-02-18 00:00:0034Chateau Franco-British National Cemetery, Seine-Et-Marne, FranceMcEVOY, Aircraftman 1st Class Francis. Served in the 3rd Aircraft Depot RAF (55219). He died on the 18.2.19 age 34, and is buried in Perreuse Chateau Franco-British National Cemetery, Seine-Et-Marne, France, plot 1, row C, grave 35. He was the son of Francis and Mary McEvoy of Artana, Dromara, Co. Down. The cemetery is situated within the grounds of the Chateau of Perreuse, Signy Pereuse, a hamlet of Signy-Signets, which is 7 kilometres south-west of La Ferte Sous-Jouarre and 60 kilometres east of Paris. The Chateau was used by French medical units throughout the 1914-1918 War and the site of the Cemetery was presented by the owner, Mme. Dumez, to the French Government. The British graves were all brought in from the battlefields.
587McFallJohnPvt275311RDFIrishMiddlesboroughLisburnFranceCambraiDOW1918-07-18 00:00:00Tincourt New British Cemetery, FranceMcFALL, Private John. He lived in Lisburn, and enlisted at Middlesborough, serving in 1 RDF (27531). He DoW in France on the 18.7.18 and is buried in Tincourt New British Cemetery, France, plot 9, row E, grave 7. There is no headstone inscription.
588McFarlandRobertLcpl5/165565RInFIrishBelfastDublinMiddle EastPalestineKIA1917-12-27 00:00:00Jerusalem War Cemetery, PalestineMcFARLAND, Lance Corporal Robert. Born in Belfast, he enlisted at Dublin and served in 5 RInF (5/16566). KIA in Palestine on the 27.12.17, he is buried in Jerusalem War Cemetery, Israel, plot F, grave 35. He was the son of the late Thomas McFarland.
589McGeownIrene EthelCivBelfastHomeOrlock Hill, GroomsportKilled/shot1914-08-26 00:00:0033Belfast City CemeteryMcGEOWN, Irene Ethel. Civilian. Until a few years before the war, Irene McGeown had lived in Lisburn with her father who had run a stationer’s and photographer’s business in Market Square. She died on the 26.8.1914 aged 33 as a result of a gunshot wound received at about 8.30 on the evening of the 23 August. She was shot in the head by a military sentry outside the naval signaling station at Orlock Hill (mid way between Bangor and Donaghadee) as she was travelling in the back seat of a car driven by her brother-in-law Alfred Chapman, a clothing manufacturer of Malone Park Belfast. The sentry had challenged Chapman four times to stop but, not seeing the sentry and only hearing one command to “Halt”, he had driven on. The sentry opened fire hitting Irene McGeown in the head, although according to another version of events the sentry had fired a warning shot which had “richochetted over a tree” before hitting her. She was taken initially to the farm of a Mr. Aird and then to Bangor Cottage Hospital where she died three days later. At the inquest held into her death the jury, “attached no blame to anyone”. A clerk working in Belfast, she was the sister of Clarence McGeown of 34 Wolseley Street, Belfast.

“This”, according to the Standard, “was one of the first realities of the war so far as Lisburn was concerned”. It was not to be the last. Nor was it to be the last incident to occur at Orlock. On the 15 September 1915, just over a year after Irene McGeown’s death, Alexander McGahey, a 52 year old butler employed by Harold Barbour of Strathearn, Dunmurry, was shot in similar circumstances. He had been cycling home along the shore road and as he reached Orloch, was challenged by a sentry. McGahey continued on his way, subsequently claiming that he was deaf and did not hear the sentry. After repeating his challenge the soldier then thrust out his rifle to try to stop the butler as he cycled past. This too had no effect and the sentry opened fire. McGahey was hit in the lung and fell from his bike. When he was taken to Bangor Hospital he was given little chance of survival although the following day his condition had improved.
McGeown, IreneEthelPat Geary/Ancestry Family Tree
590McGeownEdwardPvt132061RInFIrishDerryloran, Co. TyroneCookstownDunmurryTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-04-28 00:00:0020Helles Memorial, GallipoliMcGEOWN, Private Edward. Born in Derryloran, Co. Tyrone, he enlisted at Cookstown and served in 1 RInF (13206). KIA in Gallipoli on the 28.4.15 age 20, his death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, panels 97 to 101. He was the son of James and Mary Jane McGeown of 27 Milfort Avenue, Dunmurry.
591McGeownRobertRm49082RIRIrish5 RIR?BlarisLisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1915-05-09 00:00:0036Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumMcGEOWN, Rifleman Robert. Born in Blaris Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Lisburn. Possibly a reservist in 5 RIR, he served in 2 RIR (4908). KIA near Hill 60 outside Ypres in Belgium on the 9.5.15 aged 36, his death is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, panel 40. He was the son of William and Ann Jane McGeown of 47 Church Street, Lisburn.
592McGivernJohn (Jack)Rm38752RIRIrishLambegLisburnLambegTullynacross, LisburnFranceSommeDied1918-03-24 00:00:00Pozieres Memorial, FranceMcGIVERN, Rifleman John (Jack). Born and living in Lambeg, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 2 RIR (3875). Wounded three times, he was listed as missing from the 24.3.18 and subsequently as having died on the Somme on that date. Commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, France, he was the son of Mrs. McGivern of Tullynacross, Lisburn. A short article in the Standard on the 10 May 1918 noted that, “she would be deeply grateful to anyone for news of her missing son”. She had two other sons serving, Sam, who may have served in the RIR (2529) who was wounded twice, possibly once in June or July 1917, and James who was wounded once. Both appear to have survived the war. On the 29 December 1916 a letter from Arthur Moore 2 RIR to the secretary of the Hilden-Lambeg Work Association, appeared in the Standard. In it he thanked them for comforts he had received. “I am very grateful to you for the parcel, which came in very useful at the time, especially the Woodbine cigarettes; they were a treat. Please give my thanks to the women of Hilden and Lambeg for the comforts, and I wish they all spend a happy Xmas and a pleasant New Year. Jack McGivern wishes to be remembered to you all. He received your kind parcel and thanks you for it”.
593McGowanJamesPvt85461RIrFIrishLisburnLurganLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-10-12 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcGOWAN, Private James. Born and living in Lisburn, he had twelve years service in the army before the war broke out. Enlisting at Lurgan, he served in 1 RIrF 8546, going to the front with the first Expeditionary force in 1914. Initially reported wounded and missing, he was KIA on the Somme on the 12.10.16. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15A, he was the eldest son of the late James McGowan and Jane Graham of 15 Market lane, Lisburn. According to the Herald, he a brother killed in March 1915 and another brother and a brother-in-law serving. This was probably Rifleman Thomas Graham, who was KIA in France on the 11.3.15 aged 18 he was the son of Jane Graham, formerly McGowan of 15 Market Lane, Lisburn and the late Edward Graham. This means that she had been widowed twice and lost two sons in the war.
594McGreevyFrancis StanleyLcpl206795RInFIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburn/Flurry Bridge, Co. ArmaghFranceOther/St. QuentinKIA1918-10-08 00:00:0022Beaurevoir Communal Cemetery British Extension, FranceMcGREEVY, Lance corporal, Francis Stanley. Born in Lisburn, he was a tailor by trade and worked in Belfast. Although when reporting his death, the Standard claimed that he had enlisted in January 1917, it is possible it may have been 1915. On the 5 March that year the paper carried a short article about a Stanley McCreevy, John Patrick McComiskey (above) and others who were stationed with the Irish Brigade at Fermoy, writing to the secretary of Lisburn Catholic Club thanking the members for sending them tobacco and cigarettes. He served in 5 RInF (20679) and was posted to Egypt, Mesopotamia and later the Western front. Reported wounded in late May or early June 1917, he was KIA in France on the 8.10.18 age 22. He had just returned to his battalion after being at home on leave. Francis McGreevy is buried in Beaurevoir Communal Cemetery British Extension, Aisne, France, row A, grave 9. He was the son of Patrick and Catherine E. McGreevy of Llewellyn Avenue, Lisburn and later of Flurry Bridge, Co. Armagh. Patrick McGreevy had been employed for many years at Hilden. The Standard for 12.10.17 has a report on a “recent” football match between Ireland and America that took place at Clark’s Athletic Field, East Newark. Ireland won 3:2 with two of the goals being scored by Tom McGreevy, “the famous Irish runner” of llwellyn Avenue, Lisburn. “He was home … last week-end, but his leave was necessarily short owing to American war work on which he is at present engaged”. McGreevey, FrancisStanleyNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
595McGroganRobertPvt209698RIrFIrish3939 CRSt.Pat's Co ABelfastLisburnFranceLensKIA1916-05-10 00:00:00Mazingarbe Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceMcGROGAN, Private Robert. Born in St. Patricks, Co. Antrim, he lived in Lisburn, enlisted at Belfast and served in CR (3939) before transferring to 8 RIrF (20969). KIA in France on the 10.5.16, he is buried in Mazingarbe Communal Cemetery Extension, France, plot 1, row C, grave 2.
596McGurkJohnRm685711RIRIrishBlarisClandeboyeLisburnLisburnHome/AldershotLambeg/SommeDOW1916-07-24 00:00:0019Lambeg Church of Ireland ChurchyardMcGURK, Rifleman John. Born in Blaris, he lived at 12 McKeown Street, Lisburn, and was a member of Millview Football Club. He may have worked, possibly as a reeler, for Robert Stewart and Sons. He enlisted at Clandeboye and served in B Company 11 RIR (6857) embarking with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. Wounded on the Somme on the 1.7.16 he DoW at Cambridge Hospital, Aldershot on the 24.7.16 aged 19 and was buried in Lambeg Parish Church Graveyard, grave 206 near the eastern end of the church, on Saturday 29th. He was the son of the late Andrew and Martha McGurk of McKeown Street, Lisburn and brother of Jane and Thomas McGurk. Jane McGurk was married to James Abbott of 12 McKeown Street, Lisburn. On the 26 July 1919 they inserted the following In Memoriam notice in the Herald. “Now a sister’s heart is aching For a brother she loved so well; He gave his life for his country, In honour’s cause he fell”. James Abbott was probably the brother of William Abbott (above) who like John McGurk had been killed on the opening day of the Somme.McGurk, JohnNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
597McIlfatrickDanielRm104996RIRIrishColeraineLisburnLisburnTurkeyGallipoliKIA1915-08-10 00:00:0027Helles Memorial, GallipoliMcILFATRICK, Rifleman Daniel. Born in Coleraine, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 6 RIR (10499). In the Standard for the 24.9.15 his wife had been notified that he had been wounded at Gallipoli but was, “without information as to the extent of wounds or the name of the hospital where he is under treatment and would be glad to receive news from any of her husband’s comrades”. KIA in Gallipoli on the 10.8.15 aged 27, his death is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, panels 177-8. He was the son of William and Mary McIlfatrick of Ballinamallard, Co. Fermanagh and husband of Annie McIlfatrick of 44 Church Street, Lisburn. McIlfatrick, DanielNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
598McIlwrathGeorge HenryRm1830913RIRIrishDromoreLisburnLisburnLisburn/DromoreFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0025Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcILWRATH, Rifleman George Henry. Born in Dromore, he lived in Lisburn where he enlisted and served in 13 RIR (18309). Reported missing and subsequently, in June or July 1917, confirmed as having been KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 25. His death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, faces A/B. He was the son of Elizabeth and the late Robert James McIlwrath of Lower Plantation, Lisburn and Dromore.
599McIlwrathCharlesRm105802RIRIrishLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-15 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcILWRATH, Rifleman Charles. Born in and enlisting at Lisburn, he served in 2 RIR (10580) and was KIA on the Somme on the 15.7.16. His death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, faces A/B.
600McIversDanielLcpl89452RIRIrishStoneyfordBelfastFranceLensKIA1914-10-27 00:00:00Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg-l'Avoue, FranceMcIVERS, Lance corporal Daniel. Born in Stoneyford, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 2 RIR (8945). KIA in France on the 27.10.14, his death is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, France.
601McKeaveneyThomasPvt15617FARAMCSupportLisburnBelfastClough, Co. AntrimBelgiumPoperingheDOW1916-05-29 00:00:0029Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, BelgiumMcKEAVENEY, Private Thomas. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in the 17th. Field Ambulance RAMC (156). He DoW in Belgium on the 29.5.16 aged 29, and is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, Belgium, plot 7, row A, grave 29. The headstone inscription reads, “Rest in the Lord”. He was the husband of Elizabeth McKeaveney of Dunbought, Clough, Co. Antrim and son of John and Alice McKeaveney of 175 Durham Street, Belfast. When the cemetery was visited on the 7.8.96 a small wooden Remembrance Day cross with the inscription, “RIP. Great Nephew Thomas” had been placed in front of the headstone.
602McKechnieRobertLcpl1831411RIRIrishDunmurryLisburnDunmurryDunmurryFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0021Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcKECHNIE Lance Corporal Robert. Born and living in Dunmurry he enlisted at Lisburn and served in 11 RIR (18314) embarking with them for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 age 21, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France, pier and face 15 A and B. He was the eldest son of James and Janet McKechnie of Milfort Avenue, Dunmurry, Belfast. McKechnie, RobertNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
603McKeeSamuelRm52042RIRIrish5 RIR?BlarisLisburnLisburnBelgiumMessinesDOW1915-02-21 00:00:0019Locre churchyard, BelgiumMcKEE, Rifleman Samuel. Born in Blaris, he enlisted at Lisburn. A trucker at the Island Mill, Lisburn, he was also a reservist in 5 RIR and was sent out from Victoria Barracks, Belfast with drafts from his battalion to serve with 2 RIR (5204) which had been “badly cut up by the Germans”. He DoW in Belgium on the 21.2.15 aged 19 and is buried in Locre Churchyard, West Flanders, Belgium, plot 2, row A, grave 4. The headstone inscription reads, “Until the day breaks”. He was the son of Samuel and Ellen McKee of 33 Gregg Street, Lisburn.
604McKeeThomas JohnRm131618RIRIrishH'boroBelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Serre Road Cemetery No.2, FranceMcKEE, Rifleman Thomas John. Born in Hillsborough, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 8 RIR (13161). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 he is buried in Serre Road Cemetery No. 2, France, plot 8, row G, grave 4.
605McKeeJames JohnstonRm154258RIRIrishDromaraBelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-07-02 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcKEE, Rifleman James Johnston. Born in Dromara, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 8 RIR (15425). KIA on the Somme on the 2.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A and 15 B.
606McKeownDavid ThomasRm674414RIRIrishDromoreBelfastTullynishey, DromaraTullynishey, DromaraFranceSommeKIA1916-05-06 00:00:0024Authuile Military Cemetery, FranceMcKEOWN, Rifleman David Thomas. Born in Dromore, Co. Down, he lived at Tullynishey. A member of the Orange Order, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 14 RIR (6744). KIA on the Somme on the 6.5.16 age 24, he is buried in Authuile Military Cemetery, France, row D, grave 54. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of George McKeown of Tudyniskey, Dromara, Co. Down. A wreath left in front of the headstone in July 2002 read “In proud and loving memory of Bro [brother] D.T. McKeown from the officers and members of Waringsford Rising Star LOL 545 Co. Down. July 2002”.
607McKeownWilliamRm299711RIRIrishBelfastLisburnDunmurryDunmurryFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcKEOWN, Rifleman William. Born in Belfast, he lived at 5 Auburn Street, Dunmurry, with his wife and family. An old soldier with seven years service in 1 RIR, he was employed as a carter at William barbours and Sons. On the outbreak of war, he re-enlisted at Lisburn, and served in 11 RIR (2997) with whom he embarked for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France, pier and face 15 A and B. McKeown, WilliamNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
608McKeownWilliamRm727922EBSupport11.13 RIRLisburnHillhall, LisburnHillhall, LisburnFranceSomme/St. QuentinKIA1918-03-29 00:00:0023Pozieres Memorial, FranceMcKEOWN, Rifleman William. Before the war he lived at Hillhall, Lisburn with his aunt and had worked at Glenmore Bleachworks. A member of the UVF, he enlisted in Lisburn and embarked for France from Bordon with 11 RIR in October 1915. Involved in the fighting on the Somme and in other major engagements, he had, until his death, came through it all unhurt. Later transferred to 11/13 RIR (7279), he was reported wounded and missing while attached to the 22nd. Entrenching Battalion. In late June or early July 1919 he was confirmed as having been KIA at St. Quentin on the 29 March 1918, he was about 23 years old. His death is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, France, panels 74-6. During his military service on the Western front, William McKeown had been home on leave twice. He was the nephew of Charles and Phenia Finlay of Hillhall, Lisburn and brother of Rifleman Frank McKeown who lived at 21 Ballynahinch Road, Lisburn with his wife Jane. Frank had served in the same battalion as Willaim but was badly wounded and permanently disabled at Messines and was invalided out of the army. After the war he was employed by the “Lisburn News Room”. On the 5 July 1919 they remembered William McKeown’s passing in the Lisburn Herald.
609McKibbenFrederickRm1676213RIRIrishLisburnBelfastLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0020Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcKIBBEN, Rifleman Frederick. Born and living in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 13 RIR (16762). Reported missing and subsequently KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 20, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, faces A/B. He was the son of Thomas and Annie McKibben of 24 Sloan Street, Lisburn.
610McKnightJamesRm131639RIRIrishLisburnBelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-02-10 00:00:00Sucrerie Military Cemetery, Colincamps, FranceMcKNIGHT, Rifleman James. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 9 RIR (13163). KIA on the Somme on the 10.2.16, he is buried in Sucrerie Military Cemetery, Colincamps, France, plot 1, row A, grave 1. There is no headstone inscription.
611McKnightErnestLsgt1343511BRScottishLlandudnoWindermereLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Lonsdale Cemetery, Authuile, FranceMcKNIGHT, Lance Sergeant Ernest. Born in Llandudno, Carnarvon, he lived in Lisburn, enlisted at Windermere, Westmorland and served in 11 BR (13435). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, he is buried in Lonsdale Cemetery, Authuile, France, plot 1, row A, grave 9. The headstone inscription reads, “Until the day break”. He was the son of Mr. McKnight of Rhos Cottage, Broughmore Maze, Lisburn.McKnight, ErnestPat Geary/Lonsdale Project
612McLarnonGeorgeRm728611RIRIrishDunmurryBelfastDunmurryDunmurryFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0024AIF Burial Ground, Grasslane, Flers, FranceMcLARNON, Rifleman George. Born in Dunmurry, he lived there with his sister, Mrs Ballantine, at 10 Maryville Terrace. A member of Dunmurry True Blues LOL 1046, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 11 RIR (7286) embarking with them for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. Reported MIA and a year later confirmed KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 age 24, he is buried in the A.I.F. Burial Ground, Flers, Somme, France, plot 15, row P, grave 25. The headstone inscription reads, “Tho’ lost to sight to memory ever dear”. He was the son of John and Ellen McLarnon of Dunmurry, Belfast. The A.I.F. Burial Ground is some way from area where 11 RIR were engaged on the 1.7.16. He is probably buried there because of the concentration of graveyards or the late discovery of his body. Notice that he was still officially missing a year after he was killed. McLarnon, GeorgeNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
613McLarnonWilliam RobertLcpl33551SGScottishLisburnGlasgowFranceSommeKIA1916-09-25 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcLARNON, Lance corporal William Robert. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Glasgow and served in 1 SG (3355). KIA on the Somme on the 25.9.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 7D.
614McLeavyCharles EdwinPvt88344650CEF ARImperialH'boroFranceRearDOW/gas1918-11-09 00:00:0036Etaples Military Cemetery, FranceMcLEAVY, Private Charles Edwin. Born in Co. Down on the 18.7.1882 he may have lived at Corcreeny, Hillsborough, Co. Down before emigrating to Canada. A single man and farmer by profession, he lived at Cremona, Alberta before enlisting at Carstairs, Alberta on the 19.6.1916 aged 33 years and 11 months. He had no previous military experience and was passed fit for overseas service the same day. 5’ 10” tall he had a 38” chest (fully expanded) with a 4” range of expansion, dark complexion, blue eyes and brown hair. He DoW from gas in France on the 9.11.18 aged 36 while serving in 50 AR, CEF (883446) and was buried in Etaples Military Cemetery, France, plot 50, row A, grave 22. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of John W. and Lillian Mary McLeavy of Kilwarlin, Hillsborough, Co. Down. At the time of his enlistment in 1916 he gave his mother as his nok and her address as 44 University Road, Belfast.
615McLernonRobertPvt69682RIrRIrishLisburnGlasgowLisburnBelgiumOther/MonsDied1914-08-24 00:00:00St. Symphorien Military Cemetery, BelgiumMcLERNON, Private Robert. Born in Lisburn where he lived on the Low Road, he enlisted at Glasgow and served in 2 RIrR (6968). He died in Belgium on the 24.8.14 and is buried in St. Symphorien Military Cemetery, Belgium, plot 1, row A, grave 19.
616McManusHugh MPvt141IGIrishLisburnOxfordBelfastFranceLensKIA1915-05-18 00:00:00Le Touret Memorial, Richebourg-l'Avoue, FranceMcMANUS, Private Hugh M. Born in Lisburn, he lived in Belfast, enlisted at Oxford and served in 1IG (14). KIA in France on the 18.5.15, his death is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, France, panel 4.
617McMasterPhilip GeorgeLt18MGCSupportRIR?Tullyard, LisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1918-06-20 00:00:0027Ribemont Communal Cemetery Extension, Somme, FranceMcMASTER, Lieutenant Philip George. He lived at Tullyard House, Hillhall, Lisburn and before the war worked for the Board of Trade in Dublin. Commissioned into one of the reserve battalions of the Ulster Division in March 1915, he served in the RIR and was transferred to 18 MGC in November 1916. Reported wounded in May 1917, he was KIA on the Somme on the 20.6.18 age 27, he is buried in Ribemont Communal Cemetery Extension, Somme, France, plot 4, row L, grave 7. The headstone inscription reads, “Asleep in Jesus blessed sleep from which none ever wake to weep”. He was the son of John and Margaret McMaster of Tullyard House, Hillhall, Lisburn. His death is also commemorated on the family headstone in Drumbo Presbyterian church graveyard. John McMaster died on the 3.4.22 aged 78, Margaret McMaster on the 7.2.32 aged 79. He may have had a brother Samuel McMaster, also of Tullyard House, who served in the Canadian Navy and survived the war. He was also a nephew of Robert Diamond of Lisburn. McMaster, PhilipGeorgeNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
618McMillanJohnLcpl1677012RIRIrishLisburnBelfastLisburnLisburnFranceBelgian borderKIA1918-07-30 00:00:00Bertenacre Military Cemetery, Flertre, FranceMcMILLAN, Lance corporal John. Born and living in Lisburn, before the war he worked as a clerk at Barbour’s Mill at Hilden. A keen sportsman, he was a member of Lisburn Rugby Club, Roseville F.C. and South Antrim Hockey Club, he was also a Lieutenant in the 23rd (Railway Street Presbyterian Church) Company of the Boys Brigade. Enlisting at Belfast, possibly in 14 RIR (YCVs), he went to the Front with the Ulster Division in October 1915 and subsequently served in 2 RIR (16770). Escaping injury until late in the War, he was KIA in France by a German shell on the 30.7.18. He was the son of the late Joseph McMillan of Castle Street, Lisburn and brother of Miss I. McMillan. Returning a letter which she had sent, CQMS Fox wrote to his sister, “It is not a very pleasant task I have set myself, to break the news to you of your brother’s death on the 30th July, 1918, more especially after the recent sad loss you sustained through the death of your father, which I understand took place only a few weeks ago. … Your brother was extremely popular, and since he joined this battalion and being posted to B Company was my Company Clerk. He and I have always been the best of friends … . Your brother, with a number of others, was in company headquarters when a shell came and buried the lot. Some of them were fortunate to escape with bruises etc., but I am sorry to say six succumbed out of the lot. If it is any consolation to you to know, your brother was buried close to here, and a nice cross has been erected over him”. Captain, the Rev. W.H. Hutchinson also wrote to Miss McMillan painting a similar picture of her brother and his fate. “He was with some others in a front line shelter”, he said, “when an enemy shell penetrated, and death was mercifully sudden. His body was brought back and interred in a little French cemetery here. Allow me to tender my deepest sympathies. … Your brother was one of the best, a loyal comrade, an excellent soldier and a true man”. John McMillan is buried in Bertenacre Military Cemetery, Flertre, France, plot 1, row C, grave 9. There is no headstone inscription. Two others who died that day, Sergeant Robert James Gibson from Banbridge and Rifleman Stanley Collins from Kent are buried in plot 1 as well, Gibson in row C, grave 10 beside John McMillan, and Collins in row B, grave 9. Two others, Riflemen David McIlroy and Samuel Clarke are commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial to the missing.McMillan, JohnNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
619McMullanRobertPvt2719210RInFIrishGlenavyBelfastBelfastFranceSommeDOW1916-07-03 00:00:0036Puchevillers British Cemetery, FranceMcMULLAN, Private Robert. Born in Glenavy, Co. Antrim, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 10 RInF (27192). He DoW on the Somme on the 3.7.16 age 36, and is buried in Puchevillers British Cemetery, Somme, France, plot I, row A, grave 27. He was the husband of Agnes McMullan of 31 Queensland Street, Belfast.
620McMullenJamesRm304511RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLisburnFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcMULLEN, Rifleman James. Born in Blaris, he enlisted at Lisburn and served in D Company 11 RIR (3045) with whom he embarked for France from Bordon in October 1915. KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier 15, faces A/B. He was the son of Edward and Eliza M’Mullen of 41 Hill Street, Lisburn. They included the following verse with an In Memoriam notice published in the Herald on the 30.6.17. “God takes our loved ones from our homes, But never from our hearts”.
621McMullenJohnLcplRIRIrish
622McMullenRobert HRmRIRIrishH'boro? DrumloughMcMULLEN, Rifleman Robert H. Lived at Drumlough, Hillsborough, Co. Down and served in the RIR. His death is commemorated on Hillsborough War Memorial. No positive trace so far.
623McNairRichard IsaacRm1816711RIRIrishLisburnLisburnLisburnLisburnHomeLisburn/Purbysburn Fever Hosp.Died1915-03-29 00:00:0035Hillhall Presbyterian ChurchMcNAIR, Rifleman Richard Isaac. Born at Millbrook Road on the Low Road in Lisburn, he lived at number 38. A member of the 1st Lisburn battalion of the UVF, he enlisted in the town and served in 11 RIR (18167). On the 28 March 1915 he was taken from Clandeboye, where he was training with his battalion, to Purdysburn Fever Hospital where he died the following day (the 29.3.15), aged 35. It was about this time that there was an outbreak of cerebro-spinal meningitis amongst the 36 Division at Clandeboye, but it is not clear whether or not this was the cause of his death. Richard McNair was buried in Hillhall Presbyterian Church graveyard, grave 191 on Wednesday 31 March, his headstone inscription reads, “God is my salvation”. The son of John and Ellen McNair, he was married to Mary McNair who by the end of the war was living at 70 Millbrook, Low Road, Lisburn. Mary McNair was his second wife and he was also survived by a child from his first marriage. According to the Standard, “his ambition [was] to get to the Front”, however, he died 7 months before 11 RIR left Bordon Camp for France in October 1915.
624McNairJohnRm127911RIRIrishBlarisLisburnLower Plantation, LisburnLower Plantation, LisburnBelgiumYpresKIA1916-09-01 00:00:0019Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumMcNAIR, Rifleman John. Born in Blaris, he lived at Lower Plantation, enlisted at Lisburn and served in 11 RIR (1279). He embarked with them for France from Bordon in October 1915 and was KIA in Belgium on the 1.9.16 aged 19. His death is commemorated on the Ypres, Menin Gate, Memorial, Belgium, panel 40. He was the son of John and Margaret McNair of Lower Plantation, Lisburn. He had two married sisters, Nellie Hunter (husband John), Hillhall Road, Lisburn and Mary Killips? (husband William) both of who inserted death notices in the Standard on the 22nd. September.
625McNamaraEdwardPvt36276CRIrishH'boroBelfastH'boroFranceLensKIA1916-01-28 00:00:00Vermelles British Cemetery, FranceMcNAMARA, Private Edward. Born and living in Hillsborough, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 6 CR (3627). KIA in France on the 28.1.16, he is buried in Vermelles British Cemetery, France, plot 2, row M, grave 2. McNamara, EdwardNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
626McNamaraJosephMcNAMARA, Joseph. He is commemorated on Lisburn War Memorial but there is no positive trace so far.
627McNeiceAlexanderRm44810RIRIrishGlenavyBelfastGlenavy/BelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:00Thiepval Memorial, FranceMcNEICE, Rifleman Alexander. Born in Glenavy. Co. Antrim, where he was a member of the Orange Order, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 10 RIR (448). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A and B. He was the son of James McNiece of Glenavy, Co. Antrim and husband of Clarance McNiece of 24 Haldane Street, Belfast.
628McPhillipsPatrickPvt35386RIrRirishArdeeArmaghHilden/DroghedaFranceLensDOW1916-07-23 00:00:0021Bethune Town Cemetery, FranceMcPHILLIPS Private Patrick. Born in Ardee, Co. Louth, he volunteered for service in the summer of 1915, enlisted in Armagh and served in 6 RIrR (3538) part of the Irish Brigade. He DoW in hospital in France 23.7.16 age 21 and is buried in Bethune Town Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France, plot 5, row G, grave 24. He was the son of Thomas and Ann McPhillips of Bridge Street, Hilden and 23 Dale Street, Drogheda, Co. Meath. In a letter to his father, the chaplain of the Irish Division wrote that his son had been given extreme unction at once, and that “On the day after arrival at hospital he became worse and I gave him viaticum and the last blessing. He died like a good soldier that evening”.
629McQuaidJohnMcQUAID John. His death is commemorated on Lisburn War Memorial but there is no positive trace so far.
630McQuillanWilliam JamesSgt220811RIRIrishArdmoreBelfastCrumlinCrumlinFranceSommeDOW1916-05-19 00:00:0021Forceville Communal Cemetery Extension, FranceMcQUILLAN, Sergeant William James. Born in Ardmore, Co. Antrim, he lived in Crumlin, Co. Antrim. A member of the Orange Order in Glenavy, he enlisted at Belfast and served in D Company 11 RIR (2208) with whom he embarked for France from Bordon Camp in October 1915. He DoW at Thiepval Wood on the Somme on the 19.5.16 age 21 and is buried in Forceville Communal Cemetery and Extension, France, plot 1, row D, grave 14. There is no headstone inscription. He was the son of Robert Harper and Annie McQuillan of Crumlin, Co. Antrim.
631McReynoldsRobertPvt11346HLIScottishLisburnGlasgowGlasgowTurkeyGallipoliDOW1915-08-14 00:00:0029Lancashire Landing Cemetery, GallipoliMcREYNOLDS, Private Robert. Born in Lisburn, he enlisted at Glasgow in the 6 (City of Glasgow Territorial) Battalion HLI (1134). He DoW in Gallipoli on the 14.8.15 aged 29 and is buried in Lancashire Landing Cemetery, Gallipoli, row A, grave 57. He was the husband of Mary Murray, formerly McReynolds of 12 Parker Street, Whiteinch, Glasgow.
632McShaneThomas CharlesASSS/4230HMS VindictiveRNNavyLambegBelgiumZeebruggeKIA1918-04-23 00:00:0024Dover, St. James, Cemetery, KentMcSHANE, Able Seaman Thomas Charles. Served in the Royal Navy (SS/4230) on HMS Vindictive. KIA at Zeebrugge on the 23.4.18 aged 24, he is buried in Dover (St. James) Cemetery, Kent, plot P, row W, grave 7A. He was the son of Hugh and Margaret McShane of Lambeg, Lisburn, Co. Antrim. The cruiser Vindictive on which McShane served, played a leading role in the attack on Zebrugge on the night of 22/23 April 1918. The raid was intended to block the mouth of the Bruges canal at Zeebrugge in an attempt to prevent German submarines and torpedo boats from using it. Vindictive’s role was to come alongside the mole which sheltered the harbour and land marines who were to destroy the gun emplacements which would threaten the ships that would enter the harbour and block the canal. At first the raid appeared to have been a success but it soon became apparent that the ships which had been sunk in the entrance to the canal did little more than cause the Germans some inconvenience. McShane, ThomasNigel Henderson/Great War Ulster Newspaper Archive
633McVeighHenrySgt182778RInFIrishDerriaghyBelfastCo. LeitrimBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-16 00:00:0025Tyne Cot Memorial, BelgiumMcVEIGH, Sergeant Henry. Born in Derriaghy, he lived at Ballysheagh, Co. Leitrim, enlisted at Belfast and served in 8 RInF (18277). KIA in Belgium on the 16.8.17 aged 25, his death is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium, panels 70-2. He was the husband of the late Fanny McVeigh, and son of James McVeigh of Derriaghy, Dunmurry.
634McWilliamsJohnRm1839112RIRIrish11 RIR?LisburnLisburnBelgiumPloegsteertKIA1918-09-13 00:00:00Ploegsteert Memorial, BelgiumMcWILLIAMS, Rifleman John. Born in and enlisted at Lisburn, probably in 11 RIR, he embarked with them for France from Bordon in October 1915. Wounded on the Somme on the 1.7.16, he transferred to 12 RIR (18391) when 11 RIR were disbanded. KIA in Belgium on the 13.9.18, his death is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium.
635McWilliamsHenryRm129225RIrFIrish11793 RIRLisburnLisburnHomeLisburnDied1918-09-26 00:00:0022Lisburn CemeteryMcWILLIAMS, Private Henry. Born in and enlisted at Lisburn, he served in the RIR (11793) and then 5 RIrF (12922). He died at home on the 26.9.18 aged 22 and is buried in Lisburn Cemetery, new section, row E, grave 208. There is no headstone inscription.
636MearnsJMEARNS, Rifleman/Private J. His death is commemorated on Lisburn War memorial but there is no positive trace so far.
637MegarryRobert GeorgeSgt1558210RIRIrishMoiraBelfastMaze/LisburnLurganure, MazeFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0024Serre Road Cemetery No.2, FranceMEGARRY, Sergeant Robert George. Born in Moira, he lived at the Maze/Lisburn. A member of Broomhedge LOL 206 and the South Belfast Battalion of the UVF, he was employed as an electrician by the Northern Railway Company. enlisted at Lisburn and served in 10 RIR (15582). Reported wounded and missing he was subsequently confirmed, in late July or early August 1917, as having been KIA on the Somme on the 1 July 1916 aged 24. Writing to his mother, Second Lieutenant Henderson described him as, “a splendid man. He always performed his duties bravely and well, and, in my opinion, was the best sergeant in the battalion”. He is buried in Serre Road, Cemetery No. 2, plot 12, row L, grave 6. The inscription on his headstone reads, “Thy will be done”. He was the son of George and Mary Ann Megarry of Lurganure, Maze, Lisburn and was remembered by them in the Lisburn Herald on the 11 August 1917, 5 July 1919 and 1 July 1922. They also lost another son Samuel who died at home on the 4.12.18 and was buried in Soldierstown Churchyard. Another brother Thomas Megarry served in the RE. He appears to have survived the war. His sister and brother-in-law Lizzie and John E. Brown of Lisnoe Lisburn included the following poem with the death notice they inserted in the Herald on the 11 August 1917. “A loving brother, true and kind, Missed by those he left behind, Forget him? No, we never will, As years roll on we’ll love him still”.
638MegarryJamesSgt1969411RIRIrishCrumlinAntrimCrumlinCrumlinBelgiumYpresKIA1917-08-08 00:00:0024Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, BelgiumMEGARRY, Sergeant James. Born in Crumlin and living at Aldergrove, he was a member of the Orange Order in Glenavy belonging to Ballynadrenta LOL 1059. He enlisted at Antrim and served in 11 RIR (19694) with whom he may have embarked for France from Bordon Camp as a rifleman in October 1915. KIA in Belgium on the 8.8.17 age 24, his death is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Ypres, Belgium panel 40. He was the son of William Henry Megarry of Largy, Crumlin.
639MeharrySamuelRm17/8239RIRIrishShankill, BelfastBelfastFranceSommeKIA1916-07-01 00:00:0020Thiepval Memorial, FranceMEHARRY, Rifleman Samuel. Born in Shankill Belfast, he enlisted at Belfast and served in B Company 9 RIR (17/823). KIA on the Somme on the 1.7.16 aged 20, his death is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, pier and face 15 A and B. He was the son of the late William (who died on the 26.1.17 aged 43) and Isabella Meharry of 49 Donegall Pass, Belfast. His death is also commemorated on the family headstone in Killaney Presebyterian churchyard between Temple and Boardmills. It was erected by Isabella Meharry in memory of her husband, son Samuel and four other children who died in infancy.
640MercerThomasRm1684113RIRIrishCulcaveyBelfastCulcaveyH'boroFranceSommeKIA1916-06-28 00:00:0034Martinsart British Cemetery, FranceMERCER, Rifleman Thomas. Born and living in Culcavey, Co. Down, he enlisted at Belfast and served in 13 RIR (16841). KIA on the Somme on the 28.6.16 aged 34, he is buried in Martinsart British Cemetery, France, plot 1, row A, grave 1. He and 13 colleagues in his company were killed (10 immediately and 4 later of wounds) by a German shell which landed amongst them as they paraded in Martinsart village square to go on duty. They were all buried in Martinsart British Cemetery plot 1, row A. The headstone inscription reads, “He did his duty well”. He was the husband of Margaret Mercer of Culcavey, Hillsborough, Co. Down. Writing to Mrs. Mercer, the Presbyterian Chaplain W.J. McConnell expressed his sympathy for the loss of her husband, who “was killed during the recent attack, [that he had] fought a good fight and … let us thank God for what they accomplished, for it was indeed great.” Thomas Mercer had not in fact been involved in the attack, having died three days before it took place. As to what had been achieved, the reality was that the front line in the Thiepval sector had changed little by the time the 36 Division were withdrawn. All CWGC entries for these men give grave 1, presumably it is a communal grave. Of the 14, 7 are on this list, CSM Beaston and Riflemen A.V. Crangle, R. Crawley, S. Hamilton, G. Heenan, T. Mercer and J.G. Thompson. Mercer, ThomasPat Geary/Lisburn.com As It Was
641MillarWilliamRm55492RIRIrishLisburnLisburnDunmurryBelfastFranceRearKIA1916-05-12 00:00:0036Le Treport Military Cemetery, FranceMILLAR, Rifleman William. Born in Lisburn, he lived in Dunmurry, enlisted at Lisburn and served in 2 RIR (5549). KIA in France on the 12.5.16 aged 36, he is buried in the Le Treport Military Cemetery, France, plot 2, row K, grave 2. He was the son of Alexander and Maria Millar of Hurst Street, Belfast.
642MillarSamuelPvt130441RIrFIrishLisburnHildenBelgiumYpresKIA1916-07-29 00:00:00Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres, BelgiumMILLAR, Private Samuel. Lived at Hilden, enlisted at Lisburn and served in 1 RIrF (13044). KIA in Belgium on the 29.7.16, he is buried in Essex Farm Cemetery, Ypres, Belgium, plot 3, row A, grave 2. There is no headstone inscription. Essex Farm Cemetery is where John McCrea was serving when he wrote “In Flanders Fields”.
643MillarGeorgeSgt356038DCLIEnglishRIrF 12066PortadownBelfastLambeg/BelfastGreeceSalonikaKIA1917-09-04 00:00:0031Doiran Military Cemetery, GreeceMILLAR, Sergeant George. Born in Portadown, before the war he was employed at Queen’s Island, (the ship yard), enlisted at Belfast and served originally in the RIrF (12069). Transferred to the 8 DCLI (35603), he was KIA in the Balkans on the 4.9.17 aged 31. Buried in the Doiran Military Cemetery, Greece, plot 6, row D, grave 35, he was the son of Mr. William Miller and Mrs. A. Millar of 7 Innes Place, Belfast. His wife lived at Lambeg.
644MillarWalterCplBallylesson BelfastDrumbo/BallyaghlisBallylessonHomeDumfriesDied1918-10-19 00:00:0027Drumbo (Ballylesson) Parish Church War MemorialMILLAR, Corporal Walter. Commemorated on the memorial in Drumbo (Holy Trinity) Parish Church, there is no positive trace so far.
645MitchelFrederick DavidCpt10RIrFIrishEnniskillen/LisburnFranceSommeDOW1917-11-24 00:00:0028Grevillers British Cemetery, FranceMITCHEL, Captain Frederick David. Educated at Portora Royal School in Enniskillen he was an accountant at the Ulster Bank in Lurgan. Well known in football circles in Belfast and Lurgan, he also played for two or three seasons with Lisnagarvey Hockey Club before the war. He joined 10 RInF in 1915 and on obtaining a commission was transferred to 10 RIrF at Newtownards. He went to the front in June 1917 and was promoted to Captain in October. He DoW on the 24.11.17 aged 28 was buried in Grevillers British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France, plot 8, row E, grave 4. The second son of the Rev. S.C. Mitchell and Mrs. I. Mitchel of Enniskillen, his sister and brother-in-law William Larmour, lived at Elmwood, Belsize Road, Lisburn. His brother Lieutenant Richard Mitchel served in the RIrF and another in the Canadian Home Defence Force. The village of Grevillers about 3 kilometres west of Bapaume was occupied by Commonwealth troops on 14 March 1917. The cemetery there where Frederick Mitchel is buried, was begun in April and May by the Australian Casualty Clearing Stations which were stationed nearby.
Mitchel, FrederickDavidPat Geary/De Ruvignys
646MitchellWalterCivSS LusitaniaBallylessonAt SeaOff Souttern IrelandKilled/drowned1915-05-07 00:00:00FHS Drumbo Parish Churchyard, Co. DownMITCHELL, Walter Dawson. Civilian. Walter Mitchell was the youngest son of the Rev. George Patton Mitchell Rector of Drumbo Parish between 1890 and 1922 and Elizabeth (Bessie) Dawson. He was educated at RBAI and The Municipal Technical Institute in Belfast. Unlike his father, and older brother, he choose a career in the linen industry rather than the church, though the family joke was that they were all men of the cloth. At the Technical Institute he won a Drapers Company Exhibition an award which, in the view of one of his tutors, “is only obtainable by those who apply themselves with great earnestness to the practice and theory of their special subject”. He served his apprenticeship at the Island Spinning Company, Lisburn and in December 1912 was offered a “highly responsible” position in the firm of Messrs Marshall and Co., New Jersey.

Before his departure though he proposed to Jeanette Elizabeth Moore (Nettie) eldest daughter of William Moore a dairy farmer of Newgrove, Ballylesson, whom he had known since childhood. She accepted and agreed to go with him to America. The wedding had to be hastily arranged and as there was no time for a wedding dress to be made, one had to be purchased from Robinson and Cleaver’s, Belfast’s first department store. They left for America immediately after the wedding, travelling up to Derry in their wedding clothes. It was just before Christmas 1912. Their ship called at Queenstown (now Cobh) on the way to New York and some of Walter’s Dublin relations travelled there to see them off.

The Mitchells seem to have settled in well to their new home in Newark, New Jersey. Walter, a keen photographer took many pictures and sent them home to his family and in August 1914 their son, also called Walter Dawson, was born. But that summer was not an entirely happy time for the family. Bessie Dawson, Walter’s mother, had died on the 14 July aged 56 from an infection resulting from a thorn prick she had received while gardening and on the declaration of war in August, Nettie’s brothers Bobby and Archie (see below) had been amongst the first recruits to enlist.

By the spring of 1915 the Island Spinning Company needed Walter back in Lisburn. Walter and Nettie’s happy sojourn in America had come to an end and they treated themselves to a voyage home on the Lusitania. Nettie’s brother John Moore, who by this time had settled in Connecticut, decided to join them for a trip home.

Walter Mitchell died “of drowning and exposure” on the 7.5.15 when the Lusitania was torpedoed and sunk off the south coast of Ireland. According to an interview given by John Moore to the Lisburn Standard, they had just finished lunch and Mrs. Mitchell had gone to the cabin to look after the baby when the ship was torpedoed. “In a moment the passengers were rushing on deck to ascertain what had happened. When he got there the vessel had listed, lifeboats were being swung out from the lower side, and lifebelts handed around. He did not get a life preserver but managed to get into a boat, which on reaching the water, overturned. Luckily he got hold of a rope which was hanging over the ship’s side and held on for a little time, during which the passengers were jumping down in crowds, many of them striking him as they passed and bruising his body. Subsequently he found himself struggling in the water, and just managed to clutch the keel of one of the upturned boats, with which he supported himself until he was rescued by what he thought was a mine sweeper. He could not describe the awfulness of the scene. He had lost sight of his sister and her husband and was despairing of seeing them again, when he observed them being taken out of the sea and brought aboard the trawler. Mrs. Mitchell was in a semi-conscious state and her husband was unconscious. Mrs. Mitchell recovered under the treatment she received, but though everything possible was done to restore Mr. Mitchell it was without success. As for the baby, he did not see it after he left the liner. As to the subsequent search for some trace of the baby and the heart-rending scenes he witnessed Mr. Moore could not trust himself to speak.”

According to Nettie, as the Lusitania sank, she and Walter had found themselves in the water clinging onto a lifeboat with Walter supporting their infant son. However, in the absence of any help the young child soon died of cold. His mother knew that he was dead, “because his skin went a dark bruised colour and he had froth at his mouth”. Then as his father too lost consciousness, the child’s body slipped into the water was never recovered.

Nettie herself was fortunate to survive. When fishermen on a trawler pulled her and Walter out of the water, neither showed any sign of life. “Nettie, however, was still just alive and remembered the sensation of being dragged by her feet with her head bumping along the deck. She and Walter were left with the dead”. According to family tradition, her brother John eventually found her at Queenstown “among the corpses laid out on the harbour steps” and seeing her eyelid move, realised that she was still alive and resuscitated her.

Walter Mitchell’s body was brought home by train by his widow and brother-in–law late on Sunday night the 9 May. They were met at Lisburn station by the Rev. Mitchell, Mr. Moore senior and Miss Pounden, Mrs. Mitchell’s favourite aunt and it was to her that she, “poured out the great agony of her wounded heart.” He was buried beside his mother on Tuesday 11 May 1915 in the family burial plot at Ballylesson Parish Church, “among many manifestations of profound sorrow. The cortege was a large and imposing one, people coming from far and wide.”

The death of his wife, which George Mitchell “had taken very badly”, and then the loss of his son and grandson, left the Rev. Mitchell a “broken man.” He died on Boxing Day 1922 and is buried along with Bessie and Walter at Ballylesson. The death of Walter senior, though not his infant son, is recorded on the family headstone to the right of the main drive leading to the church.

Walter Mitchell’s wife, Nettie Moore, was born 10 July 1886 and after attending school in Lisburn, had helped her mother run the house and dairy at Newgrove, the family home. It was a Georgian building, single storied at the front with the farmyard and outbuildings tucked in behind and was built on a rath above the Lagan. It lay just across the road from Ballylesson (Drumbo Parish) Rectory her future husband’s home.

Nettie would have been 26 at the time of her marriage and still not 29 at the time of her husband’s and son’s deaths in 1915. Following her return to Ballylesson in May 1915, “she could not sleep and really thought that she could loose her mind”. Eventually though she decided to train as a midwife and went to the Rotunda Maternity Hospital in Dublin. She was working there during the Easter Rising when the centre of the city was in flames. “Ypres on the Liffey” she called it. When she had completed her training she returned home to Ballylesson and volunteered for the Red Cross in Belfast. After the war she married William Waters a cattle dealer originally from Co. Tyrone, and settled down with him on his farm on the Ravenhill Road in Belfast. On the 10 July 1925, Nettie’s 39th birthday, their first son Brian was born, followed two years later by a second boy Allen.
647MitchellWalter jnrCivSS LusitaniaAmericaBallylessonAt SeaOff Souttern IrelandKilled/drowned1915-05-07 00:00:000.75Old Church Cemetery, Queenstown (Cobh)MITCHELL Walter Dawson Jnr. Civilian. Born in America in August 1914, he died on the Lusitania on the 7.5.15 aged 9 months. The son of Walter Mitchell (see above) and Mrs. Mitchell nee Moore the daughter of William Moore of Newgrove, Ballylesson. His body, number 122, was recovered and he is buried in Common Grave C at Old Church Cemetery two miles outside Queenstown (Cobh).
648MocklerEdward Cecil WilliamLcplI88221CEF WORImperialBallinderryValcartier, Quebec, CanadaBallinderryHome/CambridgeBallinderryDOW/Langemarck1915-05-07 00:00:0021Middle Church Cemetery, Ballinderry, Co. AntrimMOCKLER, Lance Corporal Edward Cecil William. Born in Ballinderry on the 24.6.1893 he was educated at the local school. At the aged of 13 he won an Incorporated Society’s exhibition which entitled him to three years free education at Dundalk Institution. A second exhibition gave him two more years and residence at Mountjoy School in Dublin. On completing his education he emigrated to Canada, against the advice of his principal who wanted him to go to Trinity. Having secured a post with the Canadian Bank of Commerce he sailed for Montreal in July 1912 and lived in Humboldt, Saskatchewan for two years before joining up at Valcartier Camp, Quebec on the 22.9.14 aged 21 years and 3 months. A single man, he had no previous military experience, was 5’ 8½” inches tall, of a dark complexion with blue eyes and dark hair, he had a scar on the left side of his head. After training at Valcartier he served in 1 CI WOR (I8822) being posted first to Salisbury and then to the Western Front in late march or early April 1915. He died in the military hospital in Cambridge on the 7.5.15 age 21 from wounds received at Langemarck near Ypres on the 22 or 23 April. Because of his knowledge of French, he had been asked by Major Kimmins to accompany him to the French lines. On their way there Kimmins was killed and Mockler hit in the back by shrapnel which punctured his lung. Although he took cover, he was hit several more times as well as being exposed to the gas which the Germans had released on the French. It took him six hours to crawl back to his own lines from where he was taken back to base, eventually arriving in hospital in Cambridge late on the 1 May. His father was able to visit him in hospital before his death and had his remains brought home on Sunday the 9th for burial on Tuesday 11th. The son of Edward Mockler of Fruithill, Rose Lane Ends, Ballinderry, Co. Antrim who sat on the Lisburn Board of Guardians, he is buried in the family plot in Ballinderry Middle Church Cemetery, Ballinderry. According to a report of the funeral in the Standard, “There was a large number present and it was evident from the tear-brimmed eyes seen on all sides that the deceased was held in very high esteem in the neighbourhood in which he was born and reared. Numerous wreaths were sent by relatives and friends.” There is no headstone inscription. A separate headstone records the death of Alice Maud Mockler on the 28.4.1895 and Thomas McCleavy Mockler on the 26.10.1922. A Miss Mockler of Ballinderry is also recorded in the Belfast News Letter of 4.7.16 as a contributor to comforts sent out to soldiers in 11 RIR in the first half of 1916.

The events in which Mockler was involved were described by John McClelland a Dunmurry man who was also serving in the CEF. In a letter home to a friend in the village he wrote, “I expect you have heard all about our heavy casualty list. We got it good and hard while it lasted, but I might tell you we gave quite as much as we got until the Germans started shelling with the poison gas fumes. I could fill quite a few sheets of writing paper with what I came through from April 22nd up until the morning of the 24th when I got hit and half poisoned as well. We made two charges with fixed bayonets. I came through the two charges without a scratch, but three hours later I was giving a wounded comrade a drink and I got it good with a large chunk of shrapnel in the shoulder fracturing some of the bones; but the gas is worse than their biggest shells. The Germans did their best to break through our lines, but all efforts failed. They even drove the French Algerians out of their position, and that’s where we lost so many in recapturing the lost ground. We lost very heavily but we saved the situation. To tell you proper, if they had got through and crossed safely over the Yser canal there would have been nothing to prevent them being in Calais”.

It is not clear whether John McClelland survived the war or not. There are a number of casualties with that name in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission register but it is impossible to say whether he is one of them. As for Major A. E. Kimmins, the CWGC records that he died on the 24 April 1915. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial.
Mockler, EdwardPat Geary/Canadian Virtual WM
649MoffettWilliamPvt4114413RSScottishMagheragallGlasgowKilsyth, StirlingshireMagheragallFranceRearDOW1917-04-10 00:00:0020Etaples Military Cemetery, FranceMOFFETT, Private William. Born in Magheragall, he lived at Kilsyth, Stirlingshire, enlisted at Glasgow and served in 13 RS (41144). He DoW in France on the 10.4.17 age 20 and is buried in Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France, plot 22, row F, grave 23. He was the son of William Moffett of Magheragall, Lisburn. His wife and child lived at 101 Main Street, Kilsyth as did his brother-in-law and sister John and Lizzie Hoey. They inserted two poems in the Herald on the 5 May 1917. The first “Inserted by his sorrowing Wife and Child” read, “He is gone from me, Oh! How I miss him, Loving him dearly his memory I’ll keep, Ever to life’s end never shall I forget him, Dear to my heart is the place where he sleeps. When days are dark and friends are few, Dear daddie how we mourn for you”. The second included by his brother-in-law and sister read, “A hero’s grave he shares with those, Who with him there did die, Abreast they fou